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SHAKESPEARE 
CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Being a Remarkable Examination of the Plays and 
Poems, which proves incontestably that these works 
were saturated in Masonry, that Shakespeare was 
@ Freemason and the Founder of the Fraternity 


By 
ALFRED DODD, P.M. 


EDITOR ‘OF 
THE ' ALFRED DODD EDITION OF 
'SHAKESPEARE's SONNETS,''' ETC, 





LONDON: RIDER & CO. 
PATERNOSTER HOUSE, E.C. - 











SHAKESPEARE 
CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Was William Shakespeare a Mason? 

Was he, in actual fact, the unknown “culprit” 
who was responsible for inventing Speculative Free- 
masonry? If so, then one of the world’s greatest 
mysteries has been solved and the year 1717 has 
been robbed of a great deal of its illustrious fame. 

The author of this book, after profound labour 
and research, has produced from the writings of 
William Shakespeare astonishing evidences of his 
knowledge of Craft secrets. His conclusions are 
simple—Shakespeare must have been a Mason, and 
Freemasonry must have existed in Shakespeare’s day. 
From this point he proceeds to build up a case designed 
to prove that Shakespeare had at least a hand in 
devising—if he was not the sole author of—the 
Craft mysteries. 

This is a fascinating theory, and one which must 
commend itself to many members of the Brotherhood. 
The addition of so great and illustrious a figure to 
the ranks of Freemasonry would be of tremendous 
significance. The author confidently asserts that he 
was a Mason, and describes the Great Shakespeare 
Folio of 1623 as “the greatest Masonic Book in the 
world,” 





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7 
E 





Made and Printed in Great Britain at 


The Mayflower Press, 


Plymouth, William Brendon & Son, Ltd, 











TO 


MY FRIEND 
BRO. T. E. WALLER, BA, 
THE MEMBERS OF THE 
ELLESMERE LODGE, 758, 
AND THE 
RUNCORN LODGE, 4214, 
AS A LITTLE REMEMBRANCE OF 
QUIET MEMORIES 
.AND 
HAPPY HOURS 
SPENT IN THE LODGE 
AND IN THE ELUCIDATION OF 
' THE CRPATEST OF ALL MASONIC PROBLEMS— 
THE GENESIS 
OF THE CRAFT 








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PREFACE 


specific statements from the pen of the 
Author of the Shakespeare Plays. 

They constitute definite evidence that Modern 
Freemasonry was known to him and that he employed 
Masonic imagery and symbolism in his Works. 
Circumstantial evidence is brought to show that he 
must have sat in many a Speculative Lodge and 
participated in its Rites. 

Many learned Brethren believe that Freemasonry 
with its Three Degrees was created by Bros. Anderson 
and Desaguliers out of a crude operative Rite of One 


"Ds book is a straightforward compilation of 


. Degree from 1717-23-38. “The 1717-Theory” is 


no longer tenable in view of the evidence that the 
Elizabethan Brethren "'moralised on Tools and 
spiritualised Temples” in 1589. 

The business of the 1717-Brethren was not the 
creation of Symbolic Masonry, but the introduction of 
an Ethical Cult to the open world by a new type of 
Combine, the federation of all secret independent 
Lodges under a Central Head, the Grand Lodge, that 
had hitherto practised their Rites hidden from the eyes 
of all men. The Brethren of that era had had 
bequeathed to them a precious heritage handed to 
them by their Fathers—no less than an ascendin 
Pyramid of Degrees, based on a Three Craft Rite, 
the Royal Arch, through Knightly and Sovereign 
Orders to the “Thirty-Three Degree.” 

Speculative Freemasonry was born in the Elizabethan 
era. Shakespeare took an active part in its genesis. 


9 














PREFACE 


The story is told in the Great Shakespeare Folio of 
1623... the greatest Masonic Book in the world. 
The System was buried in Secret and left to grow 
and root itself, like a bulb, in the dark for a hundred 
years. The emergence of the Masons in 1723 was a 
PLANNED emergence . . . the Centenary of the 162 3 
Folio. - 
William Shakespeare was not only a Freemason, 
he was the raTHER and FOUNDER of the FRATERNITY, 


the Writer of the Rituals. 
ALFRED DODD. 


IO 


II. 
HI. 
IV. 


VI. 


VII. 
VIII. 


IX. 


CONTENTS 


Tue MYSTERY oF Moner F REEMASONRY, 
Tue Mystery or Wiitram SHAKESPEARE , 
FREEMASONRY 1N THe F OLIO 

Tue Hiram Lecenp 


“Love’s LABOURS Lost,” TuE COMEDY IN 
WHICH IS HIDDEN THE GENESIS OF THE 
CRAFT à $ 7 . é 


“THE TEMPEST,” SHAKESPEARR’s Last 
Masonie Pray , ‘ è 


Ture Masonic Rirvat Lerrer Conr 


Tue Diary or WiLLiAM SHAKESPEARE : 
“SHAKESPEARE’S Sonnets” 


Tue Scuoor or rus Rostcrossz, THe SECRET 
ELIZABETHAN Liverary Socrery 


Tue Lrrerary CHARACTERISTICS OF THE 
RITUAL AND THE AGE WHICH PRODUCED 
SUCH CHARACTERISTICS $ s : 


Conctusion: “So Worruy a Fettow AS Was 
our SHAKESPEARE” á . 


Norzs AND Facrs OF IMPonTANCE 


II 





TAGE 
21 


36 
46 
62 


74 


119 
150 


174 


193 


203 


239 
252 








PLATE 


I. 


II. 
II. 
IV. 
V. 
VI. 


VII. 


VIII. 


IX. 


XI. 


XII. 


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 


THE PREFATORY VERSE OF THE 1623 SHAKE- 
SPEARE Fono . A j s 


'Tuz For:o PoRTRArT OF SHAKESPEARE 4 
THe ErIsTLE DEDICATORY ; ; x 
“THE NAMES OF THE PrinciraLL Acrors” 


Ben Jonson TO THE AUTHOR . . . 


Tue Firsr Pace or raz Comeprss: “THE 
TEMPEST” $ $ K 5 . 


Tue Last Pace or THE Comenrs: “THE 
Winter’s Tare” E . s J 


SHAKESPEARE’S PORTRAIT IN THE “POEMS OF 
Wi. SHAKESPEARE, GENT,’ THE 1640 
EDITION OF SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS n 


Tus Heap Prare in “SHAKESPEARE’S 
Sonnets,” 1609 Quarto. í . 


Tue ‘Last Pace or “SHAKESPEARE’S 
Sonnets,” 1609 Quarro .: . . 


THE STRATFORD Monument, ERECTED IN 
1748 s; . ^ s . 3 


THE LATIN INSCRIPTION AND VERSE UNDER 
THE STRATFORD Bust . . , 


13 





FACING 
PAGE 


20 
21 
48 
49 
76: 


77 


118 


119 


152 


153 


177 





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 


PLATE 


XII Tur SHAKESPEARE MONUMENT AT WEsT- 
MINSTER ABBEY. et 


XIV. Tue Lower Part oF THE SHAKESPEARE 
Monument 


XV. THe SHAKESPEARE ScroLL 
XVI. THE JEWEL of tue Horv Rovar ArcH of 


1805 WHICH CARRIES THE Rostcrossz 
Secrer Numser or 287 


IN THE TEXT 


Masonic WATERMARKS IN OLD Booxs 
THe PILLARS oF Masonry 


A Rostcrossz Ematem, Tue Invisrpue Mino 


14 


FACING 
PAGE 


202 


203 


238 


239 


PAGE 


199 
200 


276 



































THE WORKING TOOLS OF AN OPERATIVE CRAFT 


" And the Meanest of Things are made more PRECIOUS when 
they are DEDICATED to TEMPLES,” 


The Shakespeare Folio, 1623. 


THE FIRST FREEMASON 


“So WORTHY A... FELLOW as was our SHAKESPEARE.” 


The Folio, 


THE ETHICAL SYSTEM 
BEQUEATHED TO POSTERITY 


“To My Beloved THE AUTHOR 
Mr William Shakespeare 
And 


WHAT HE HATH LEFT us,” 
Ben Jonson, The Folio. 


THE MASONIC MEETINGS AT “THE MERMAID” 


“What Things have we seen, Done at the MERMAID! Heard 
WORDS that haye been, So Nimble and so full of SUBTLE FLAME. 
: ; One had resolved to live a F ... the rest of -his dull 


Life.” A Letter to Ben Jonson from F. B. 


THE INJUNCTION 


“Reape him. . . , To your Divers Capacities, you will 
FINDE enough, both to praw, and Hold you: for his wrr can 
no more Liz HID, then it could be ros. Reapz him therefore; 
and AGAINE, and AcAINE: And if then you doe not like him, 
surely you are in some Manifest Danger, not to UNDERSTAND 
him. And so we leave you to other of his Friends, whom if 
you need, can bee Youm curpzs: if you neede them not you 
can LEAD Yourselves AND OTHERS. And such Readers we 


wish him. The Editors of the Fela, 
15 




















































































































TO THE CONCEALED CREATOR—SHAKESPEARE 


“Such is the Power of a Grand and Capacious Aspiration 
of philosophic benevolence zo EMBALM even the idlest 
LEPITIES as amber enshrines straws and insects,” 


" Bro. De Quincey, Rosicrucians and Freemasons. 








— “Oh! Mighty Poet! Thy oa te not as those ai oeer 
zb men simply and merely great wor of Art; but are Ji e the i 
I ua phenomena of Nature, lus the sun and the stars . to be FOREWORD 
x Studied with entire Submission of our own faculties, and iz y 
gna the perfect FAITH that in them there can be no too much or : N eminent literary critic has stated that the 
too little, nothing useless or inert—but that the Further we press authorship of the Shakespeare Plays is the 
M in our DISCOVERIES, the more we shall see proofs of DESIGN greatest problem in English literature, Cer. 
eng SELF-SUPPORTING ARRANGEMENT where. the tainly an equally fascinating problem in English 
CARELESS EYE had seen nothing but ACCIDENT. ; Sociology is the fons et origo of the Fraternity of Free. 
Bro. De Quincey, The Three Knocks in Macbeth, ] a ; 


THE HIDDEN MASTER from Noah who made the Ark or from King Solomon 

] ] who planned the Temple and Somehow foisted all 

“To be nippen amidst CROWDS is SUBLIMES to come down : Son É 
MIDDEN AMONGST THE CROWDS from distant generations js those tiresome measurements, fatiguing as a Surveyor's 


report, into the Bible; did it come from the East... 
€ lands of mystery and wisdom, and so reach us by 
way of insolent Greece and haughty Rome? Authori- 
ties differ widely on these matters. Writing on Free- 
Masonry in the Encyclopedia Britannica (13th edition), 
Mr. Williain Tames Hughan, author of the Origin of 
the English Rite of Freemasonry, states that “the precise 
origin of the Society has yet to be ascertained," 
elieve it is because T am not a Freemason even 
of the First Degree but have tried to cultivate an inde- 
pendent and open habit of mind that Mr, Alfred Dodd 
. has asked me to Write this Foreword. But though not 
a Mason I have read The Perfect Ceremony of Craft 
asoxry Many times, that delightful little book so like 
~ a Prayer Book in appearance and yet so free of political 
or ecclesiastical dogma. I find it full of a grave com- 
fort and sober solace though disquieting at times by 
reason of its cold and lofty idealism. 
The ideal of Freemasonry is certainly a very high 
one. I can think of none higher or more practical, 


B i 17 


” 
DOUBLY SUBLIME, Bro. De Quincey (1823), 


16 














FOREWORD 


"When anyone is said to be a member of it the world 
may know that he is one to whom the Burdened Heart 


ing Light of the Mason. 

hence then came this searching and creative 
titual? Not, I think, from any guild of masons and 
Carpenters, | cannot quite picture Bottom the weaver 


"Donne or Ben Jonson or Milton is that his grudges 
and spites and antipathies are hidden from us. We 
are not held up by some ‘revelation’ which reminds 
"us of the writer. All desire to protest, to proclaim an 
injury, to pay off. Score, to make the world the witness 
of some hardship or grievance was firéd out of him 


work expressed completely it was Shakespeare, If 
ever a mind was incandescent, unimpeded, it was 
Shakespeare's mind," 

he reason why we know so little of the origin of 
the Society of Freemasons is probably similar. The 
"mind that conceived that Wonderful Society was large, 
constructive and entirely self-effacing, the object being 


1 Virginia Woolf, 4 Room of One's Own (P. 86). These words 
bring to mind Charles Lamb’s reference to the Shakespeare Plays as 
“enrichers of the fancy, strengtheners of virtue, a withdrawing from 
all selfish and mercenary thoughts, a lesson of all Sweet and honourable 
thoughts and actions, to teach Courtesy, benignity, generosity, humanity; 
for of examples teaching these virtues his Pages are full.” 


18 


FOREWORD 


to lead men away from destructive folly to constructive 
Wisdom; to teach them to be simpler, kinder, more 
gentle; of a greater Courage and hardness in fighting 
the evil principle in their own hearts. A Society of 
this nature does not grow of itself. We do not gather 
figs from thistles. [t can only come of a full and 
mature mind. Whose was that mind? 

Mr. Alfred Dodd believes that he has found that 
fertile and creative mind in the author of the Shake- 
speare Plays. His theme is a fascinating one, his 
Elizabethan and Masonic learning immense and his 


zeal of the Intensity that makes mountains tremble. 


not accept what they are told like good little boys, 
e always wants to question, to know, to make sure. 
He is scholarly in the best sense of the word. 


" mind having first swept it clean of Prejudice and in- 


herited ideas. . You will find a. fascinating theory and 


a rich storehouse of stimulating thought. And when 


you have read it, persuade your friends to read it, 


them of this fact. If you thereby increase their irrita. 
tion, that is their affair. Know Thyself is one of the 
imperative commands of Freemasonry, and a true 
knowledge of the Self leads a man at last to that com. 
plete detachment which can encounter all opinions 
and all fortunes with unshaken equanimity, 


RICHARD INCE. 


Marey Common, 
HAsLEMERE. 


19 








l 
l 
1 
Í 
| 
l 


eee 
k Y 


tt wg 





THE PREFATORY VERSE OF THE 1623 SHAKESPEARE FOLIO 


To the Reader. ch 


This Figure, that thou here feeft pur, w 
Itwas for gentle Shakefpeare cut; — 7 
Wherein the Grauer hada ftrife 4 
with Nature, toout-doothelife: ^ 
O,could he but hauedrawne his wit 2 
As wellin braffe, ashe hath hit A 
Hisface ; the Printcwould thenfurpaffe o 


All, that vvas euer vvrit in braffe. M 
But, (ince he cànnor, Readerlooke — 7 
Noton his Pi&ure, but his Booke, 4 
BL 





Reproduced from Secret Shakespearian Seals, by Fratres Rosae. Crucis (H. Jenkins, 
7 James’ St., Nottingham), 


It will be noted that the Seal Mark of 287 is made up by a count of Letters, 
and that in line 8, in order to make up the number, the letters “W” have been 
printed with two “V’s” thus “Yy,” This is a very clear mark of design because it 
Indicates that the printer must have been instructed.to do this. 

An equally significant Signal is the “B.1."" at the end of the verse. The character 
“J? was used to indicate “J” in the Elizabethan Alphabet, and so we get the initials 
for the Two Pillars of Masonry on the first page, “B. J...’ as though on guard 
before a secret shrine of esoteric knowledge. 





This Facsimile and ail the subsequent Plates should be studied in conjunction 
with Chapter IX, page 193, “The School of the Rosicrosse,”” in which the 
significance of the '" Number-Counis ?? of Letters and Words is explained, 


Piare I 











THE FOLIO PORTRAIT OF SHAKESPEARE 


Mr. WILLIAM 


SHAKESPEARE: 


COMEDIES, . 
HISTORIES, & í 
TRAGEDIES, 4 


Publithed according to the True Original! Copies, 










LONDON, x: ud 
>. Prittedby Ifanc Haggard and Ed. Blount: <i $i; e 


A 


ne LEY 


From Becret Shakespearian Seals, 





In this Portrait which faces the Prefa 
Seal of “Fra Rosi Crosse," 1 


Brethren will note numerous marks which betray its co; 


- It is purely a Rosicrosse pr 


Prare I] 


tory Verse, we get the Second Numerical 
57. At is not a happy portrait of the author and the 
nnection with the "Mysteries, 

duction conveying an esoteric 


SHAKESPEARE, 
CREATOR OF FREEMASON RY 


I 


THE MYSTERY OF MODERN 
FREEMASONRY 


“I will find Truth though Truth w 
WITHIN THE CENTRE, 


HAMLET 
MONG the many first-class roblems still 
2 A to be solved is the Problem o Freemasonry, 


IStory is silent respecting its genesis. 
Learned Masonic historians a 


re equally dumb respect- 
ing the Ethical Sphinx which crouches ’neath the 


ence it came? 


ere hid indeed 


29 
6 
32 
157 


apparently, all inter. 
ysteries were 
ology. There 
etween the Roman Collegia (with the fall 
of the Roma. i i 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


who in 1723 emerged from their hiding-places 
carrying their new Book of Constitutions edited by 
Bro. Anderson, p.p. (The "break" occurred through 
State legislation from + 35° onwards which ruthlessly 
smashed all gild organization.) 

What human mind or minds ransacked the archives 
of antiquity and framed a Rite out of the Myths and 
Symbols of a vanished Past, joining our Modern 
Mystery to the Ancient one? Couching that Rite in 
modern language, with major penal signs based on 
the barbaric customs of our greatest historic era, the 
Elizabethan? No one seems to know. The Higher 


Degrees are likewise silent on the origin of the Ethical ` 


Cult—at all events up to and including the Thirty- 
second Degree, 


Bro. Woodford asks: “Where did the Free- 
masonry of 1717 come from? To accept the 
suggestion that so complex a system . . . could 


powers of belief.” 

Prof. Robison says: “No man can give a 
tolerable account of the origin, history or object 
of the Order, and it appears to all a lost or 
forgotten: mystery." | 

Bro. Castells declares that “the world has 
produced many wise men but as yet none of 
them has succeeded in finding the culprit who 
founded Freemasonry.” 


From 172 3, When the Freemasons boldly announced 
their existence to the world as an organized Fraternity, 
learned and unlearned men have tried to pierce the 
veil which hides the birthplace of Modern Speculative 

asonry, 


“I would give another ten years to research 
++. could I find at the end the root of the matter, 


22 












THE MYSTERY OF MODERN FREEMASONRY 


- +. I have prayed to be delivered from the 
‘Goose and Gridiron,’ the ‘Crown Alehouse’ 
and the other House Mystical which was called 
“The Rummer and the Grapes.’ ” 


ghteenth century and falsely ascribed to 


" @ genesis dating “from Time Immemorial.” 


The facts are that in 1717 “Four Old Lodges” 
united to form a “Grand Lodge.” They were in the 
habit of meeting at the taverns mentioned. . Modern 
scholars declare that out of a crude, operative masonic 


tite practised by such Lodges in 1717, there was 


and ‘Spiritualising Temples” between 1717—23—48. 

he Royal Arch Chapter was created a little later; 

later still the Higher Degrees . |, many being 

alleged to have been imported from France, everyone 

being agreed that Modern Craft Freemasonry was 
d 


“The Modern System is the direct descendant 
and successor in an unbroken line of the Operative 

_ fraternity of the Middle Ages” (p. 48). 
2 


3 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


“Between 1720 and 1730 the Three Degrees 
were made" (p. 6). 


“There was but one Degree of Initiation in 


1717" (p. 150). . 
20 ist. of F.M, F. C. Findel.) 
“The whole of the Ritual of the Craft as we 
now understand it developed during the 18th 
Century.” : 
(Apron Men, p. 132, Col. Blackham.) 


“Under the zgis of the Grand Lodge there 
grew up between 1723 and 1738 a Rite of 
Three Degrees which moralized on the Art of 
Building and the Tools used in that Art.” 


(Emb. Masonry, p. 14, A. E. Waite.) 


- "The greater part of our Ritual is Modern 
+ +. particularly the Third Degree. . . . It has 
not yet been traced before the early days of 
Grand Lodge" (p. 11 5. 
“There is no known reference to the Temple 
or to the Hiramic Legend . . . before 1723 
- only one allusion to the Pillars in a doggerel 
rhyme, 1713. Says Bro. Rylands, 'no satis- 
factory reason has so far been offered why the 
Temple of Solomon and its Builders have been 
selected to play an important part in one division 
of our legendary history’ ” (pp. 135, 132). 


(F.M. before Grand Lodge, L. Vibert.) 


Novw it cannot be too clearly emphasized that there 
are no direct proofs anywhere in printed books, MSS., 
minutes or statements by the 1717~23~38 Brethren 
that Ethical Freemasonry actually did arise in the 
Apple Tree Tavern, or Dr. Anderson’s study or in 
any other place in that era ; or that Freemasonry at 
Some particular period became telescoped into the 
operative craft and that such Lodges changed their 


24 





THE MYSTERY OF MODERN FREEMA SONRY 
operative ideals—which centred round wages, working 


the widely spread Lodges of the 1717-38 era when 
conditions of communication were bad. The impossi- 
bility of memorizing a London Ritual (that was 
chopping and changing) by Brethren of far-flung 
Lodges—Ireland, Scotland, Cheshire, Staffordshire, 
York, etc—is a decisive objection to 1717-48 
evolution theory. 

The fact is that the 1717—-25—38 Brethren dropped 
a very thick curtain behind them when they stepped 
on the open stage of the world, They took’ the most 
careful and elaborate precautions to let no one know 
what they were doing in the years immediately 


| preceding 1717. They destroyed, virtually, all 


records prior to this date, save “Old Operative 
Charges"(1) which seemed to link them to an operative 
past, and which were more or less embodied in the 
Book of Constitutions as a History of Architecture, full 
of chronological and historicaí inexactitudes. The 
world took this grave(!) recital at its face value and so 
Were sent on a wild goose chase for "Origins" among 
an illiterate craft that had certainly ceased to exist b 


_ the passing of a 1425 Act which definitely forbade 


working masons to assemble in chapters. Bro, 
Anderson confused the era in which the operative 
trade union craft died and the erain which F reemasonry 
arose. He had the soundest of Masonic reasons for 


25 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


carried with them all traces of their esoteric activities : 
. and the Curtain of Life again fell, 

|. As it is admitted we do not know what the pre-1717 
Masons were doing, the modernist 4 Priori assumption 
that they were not practising a rite of Three Degrees 
. is as likely to be wrong as right. 


"There are no records or evidence to let us 
know whatthey were doing during the immediately 
preceding years" (p. r). 

(Emb. Masonry, A. E. Waite.) 


“Tt stands to reason that at one period of our 
history we have borrowed Hermeticist symbols, 
' In no single instance can we indicate our own 
earliest possession of any symbol” (p, 142). 
“When our Ritual achieved its present trigradal 
form cannot be stated with precision” (p. 126). 


(F.M. before Grand Lodge, L. Vibert.) 


We can be, at least, historically certain of this: 
that the 1717 Lodges were not operative ones and did 
not practise an operative rite. . 

The 1425 Parliament Act begins: 


“Masons shall not congregate in Chapters or 
Congregations," and goes on to say that “they 
who cause such Chapters to be holden «s s 
shall be judged as rzLoxs and Shall be punished 
by the imprisonment of their bodies and make 
fine and ransom.” 


An authority like Bro. G. F, Fort says that the 
operative craft “ceased to have SH existence... 
neither were they allowed to meet in secret convoca- 
tion” (Early Hist. of F.M., p. 131). Bro. Pownall, too, 
says that “this Statue of 142 5 put an end to this body and 
all its illegal Chapters and pretences” (Hist, Vol, I, 
P- 353, Gould). 

26 





THE MYSTERY OF MODERN FREEMASONRY 


These repressive Acts were never repealed. The 
Were re-affirmed when Queen Elizabeth ascended the 

hrone in 1558. A few years later Elizabeth's 
Statute of Labourers (5 Eliz. 4) was passed. All” 
individual or collective right of expression by working- 


ment who regulated his wages, hours of labour, his 
residence, etc. Owing to peasant risings, the various 
Governments from 1 350 had refused to tolerate any 
form of workman’s combine. ‘The edicts had ruth- 
lessly smashed the operative trade gild. Individual 
masons persisted but not in the form of a trade lodge, 
There is not a scintilla of evidence that in the teeth 
of the State Laws one solitary lodge of working masons 
ever survived the 142 5 Decree, the Tudor enactments, 
persisted through Elizabeth's reign, the civil wars of 
Cromwell, the turmoils of the Restoration, to change 
its Trade Union nature, but not the name of Mason 
in 1717. 


" After the- Reformation, the operative craft 
would necessarily die out," 


(FM, p. 93, L. Vibert.) 


There were, therefore, no operative lodges in 
England in 1717 that were “successors in an unbroken 
line” of the Middle Age operatives, They had ceased 
to exist three hundred years previously: “Indeed , , .” 
admits Bro. Vibert, "they could not have survived 
Edward VI Statute" (see F.M., P. 43) Their places 
had somehow been taken bya Fraternity of scattered 
Lodges of "Gentlemen" that in 1717 were practising 
an Ethical Symbolism called Freemasonry, the modern 
Tepresentative of the Ancient Wisdom, 

There had been a Death and a Resurrection; the 
Death of a common building trade, in 1350 to 142 ý; 
its Resurrection as a Royal Art, in 172 3~38 or prior 


27 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


to that period. Some person or persons with the 
magic wand of a “Prosper-O” had cried “Prosper the 
Arf’ and had breathed into the dead bones of the 
operative past a new spirit and had made them live 
inanewform. Concerned only with moral philosophy, 
Freemasonry was outside the scope of State legislation 
which forbade agitations re wages, etc, 

The 1717 Masons did not therefore practise an 
Operative Rite but a Speculative one. It was one 
which they did not create out of a ‘Trinitarian operative 
belief, but was a Ceremonial handed to them secretly 


- bya preceding generation. Their duty was to organize 


the existing Lodges scattered over the Kingdom into 
a closely knit Fraternity with a Central Head . ew 
the Grand Lodge. That was the business of Drs. 
Anderson and Desaguliers, not the creation of a 
System of Ethics. 

It has been alleged that we do not know what the 
pre-1717 Masons practised in their Lodges. This is 
not exactly correct. They practised a Rite of Three 
Degrees (at least) according to Bro. W. Preston,? the 
second Official historian of Grand Lodge. It is 
obvious that as an official historian he speaks with 
authority in matters Masonic. He stands in a 
different category (his work having been passed by 
Grand Lodge) from later historians like Bros. Findel 
or Gould, Vibert or Waite, who simply voice their 
individual opinions. 

Bro. Preston was a Past Master of the famous 
“Lodge of Antiquity,” one of the “Four Old Lodges” 


1 William Preston was of wealthy parents and an early lover of 
ancient literature, He went to London in 1760 and was connected 
with the printing trade. © He was a member of several Lodges and 
2 Founder. He lectured on Masonry to the Brethren. His official 
work, The Illustrations of F.M., was written for public consumption. 
He cleverly confuses varying portions of the Ritual. The book went 
through many editions. He was a very shrewd intellectual, 
transparently honest and sincere, 


28 














THE MYSTERY OF MODERN FREEMASONRY 
which ame Grand Lodge. He declares that this 


Lodge had: 


“Always preserved their Original Power 6 
ENE PASSING and RAISING Maa 
P- 239). 

"This Lodge has existed as a Lodge in the 
Metropolis long before the existence of Grand 
Lodge, almost 45 far back as the middle of the 
last century” (i.e. 16 50)... consisting of 

Gentlemen of Quality and Consideration who 
are scattered abroad in the most distant parts of 
the Globe" (p, 312). 

The Fraternity pre-1717 "then had a dis- 
crettonary power vested in themselves to meet as 
Masons,” and “a Lodge could be fixed at an 
particular place for a certain time, an attestation 
from the Brethren resent being sufficient proof 
of its regular constitution” (p, 314). 

„ The Brethren of the (1788) Lodge of Antiquity 

‘continue to practise the Rites in conformit 
with the ORIGINAL CONSTITUTIONS” (in 
existence before 1717) (P. 315) and “he hopes 
never to stain his character 5 FIOLATING 

. Mer" (p. 315). 

he Lodge had “derived its AUTHORITY from 
ANOTHER CHANNEL long before the ia 
lishment of Grand Lodge, which Authority had 
been repeatedly admitted and acknowledged, 

Their Immemorial Constitution was sacred to 
themselves | |. | as sacred, inviolable LANDMARKS 
not to be removed” (p- 312). 

, “Every Annual Grand Lodge had also pro- 
vided that the oip LANDMARKS be carefully 
preserved . . . for were there no standard fixed 
+.» the fluctuating state of its members might 
subject Masonry to... , VARIATION” (p, 236), 

(The Iustrations of F.M., 1588 Ed.) 


29 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


It is thus self-evident that there had been no 
“VARIATION” in the Ethical Rites of Masonry from 
1717 to 1788. The members of the Lodge of Antiquity 
would not have suffered such "variation." It is equally 
unthinkable that there could have been any change 


_ from 4650 to 1717. ‘The Lodge of Antiquity had 


preserved an unbroken ceremonial from “the middle 
of the last century” to 1788. The London Grand 
Lodge consequently practised the same Ceremonial 
derived from the same unknown authority, ie. a 
Craft Rite of Three Degrees, "MAKING, PASSING, 


- RAISING Jn 1705 there was a York Lodge of 


“Gentlemen” who were practising a similar Ethical Rite 
derived from the same unknown "Authority" whose 
Source lay far back along the secret "Channel" 


‘mentioned by Bro. Preston. York Masonry never 


obtained its Ethical Symbolism from the London 
Grand Lodge. Both the North and South Centres of 
Freemasonry derived theit Symbolism from a common 
Source, a common origin which must be looked for 
many decades Prior to the 1717 Emergence, 

The “Making, Passing and Raising” of Bro. 
Preston is more than confirmed by the so-called 
printed “Exposures” of the Craft’s Mysteries which 
followed closely the 1723 “Constitutions” (see Rituals, 
Catechisms and Exposures of the early part of the 18th 
Century, by Bro, H. Poole). {n 1712 Addison writes 
about the Sanctum Sanctorum, the Great Temple, the 
inspired Hiram . . . which is Third Degree know- 
ledge. J r7zz the Trinity College MS. proves there 


Degree being worked. On the other side of the 1717 
curtain we can be absolutely certain that our ancient 
Brethren were practising an ethical ceremonial that 
consisted of a Three Degree Craft Rite and possibly 
other Degrees, hinted at in the book of Constitutions. 

Now the earliest moment that such a ceremonial 


go 





THE MYSTERY OF MODERN FREEMASONRY 


could have arisen was about 1579, the date of Spenser's 
Shepheard’s Calendar, for the Ritual is couched in 


command given by London officers, neither did they 
understand one another’s rude patois, The first 


in 1605, by Francis Bacon. 

^. The man who coined words for Englishmen to use 
Was Shakespeare with his 20,000 word vocabulary. 
With the unknown editor of the James Bible in 1611, 
he virtually fixed our modern tongue, the first English 
grammar being printed in 1586. 

It is therefore self-evident that Modern Free. 
masonty never could have existed in the era of St, 
Alban, a.D. 303,* or Athelstane, a.n, 926, or even in 
A.D. 1400—50, the alleged dates of the “Regius Poem” 
and the “Cooke MS.,” our reputed earliest Masonic 
documents. The earliest period in which our Ritual 


7 “Tt is true our Legend says Masonry came from France ig 
St. Albans time” (L. Vibert, F.M. before 1717, P.8). All we have 
to do, therefore, is to discover whether our Ritual could have been 
in existence in the days of the medieval St. Alban, or whether the 
legend tefers—according to the canons of Masonic dissimulation— 
to the times of the Elizabethan “Saint Alban” (r 561-1626). Dr, 


31 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


the fact that much of the Ritual is taken from the 
Bible proves that Modern Freemasonry had its Genesis 
in a Protestant Era and not an England ruled by the 
Priest. . . i.e. from the Elizabethan era onwards, 

Bearing in mind that Spenser, 1579, is the utmost 
limit to which we can push back our Modern Rite 
into the Feudal Era of Egyptian darkness, we can 
follow the sirens from 1717 which have been purposely 
left by out Ancient Brethren to guide the discerning 
reader to the decade in which Modern Freemasonry 
must have taken its rise. We must therefore trace the 
hidden spring to its source . . «a along the Secret 
"CHANNEL" mentioned by Bro. Preston to the 
"AUTHORITY" anterior and superior to the present 
Grand Lodge which began in 1717. We must go back 
step by step and decade after decade, We shall then 
find sufficient evidence of the Speculative Art being 
widespread among “Gentlemen” not operatives. . . , 
"Gentlemen" who were drawn into the Masonic 
Circle not by a crude operative Rite, but by the 
mysterious drawing power of a cultured ethical 
symbolism which attracts men to-day. 

Through the antiquarian Aubrey and Sir William 
Dugdale we know that years before 1691, the manner 
of the Freemason’s adoption was “very formal with 
Signs and Watchwords.” Jy 1686, a Dr. Plot gives 
a clear account of the spread of Freemasonry all over 
England among persons of the most eminent station. 
Randle Holme of Chester leaves a paper in i650 
containing the names of Freemasons, "Gentlemen of 
quality." Jn 1646 Elias Ashmole is made at Warring- 
ton among “Gentlemen.” As far away as Perth, the 
Rosicrosse-Masons were singing in their 1638 Lodges: 


We are the Brethren of the Rosie Crosse, 

We have the Mason Word and Second Sight. 
(By “Second Sight” our Ancient Brethren meant that 
they knew how to re-read a printed work in order to 


32 


2g ens 








THE MYSTERY OF MODERN F REEMASONRY 


ascertain secret messages that followed definite codes 
Which were prevalent in that era when "every Prince 
Lnd commoner—had his Cypher.”) Jn x620 there 
1s a Freemason’s Lodge connected with the London 
Mason’s Company whose members were not labourers 
but City Merchants, Jy 1600 Squire Boswell of 
Scotland was a Freemason. J 1589 is written a 


play called Love’s Labours Lost, which contains the 
Sentence: 


“I will visit thee at the Lodge; I know where i 
is situate. . . . Come, Faquen, "m 


Running down the side of the passage is Spelled out 

in a pe Capital Letters of the lines quite 

Stratghtforwardly |. , “wr Is a Fc.” i 

that “Wil is a Fellowcratt MD 
We have reached the end of the journey. We have 

natrowed the possible birth of Modern Freemasonry 

to ten years . . . from Spenser 2579 to someone 


~ who iz 7589 had written a phrase apparently Masonic 


which hinted at a Speculative Lodge and the word of 
the Second Degree, and who also knew our Ritual 
Capital Letter Cypher Code. 

€ thus appear to be confronted in the reign of 
the "Virgin Queen" with evidences of a System of 
Freemasonry. If the system of “Making, Passing and 
Raising” had not changed in Preston's day (1788) 
from 1650, it is quite inconceivable that it could have 
Changed between 1650 and its genesis which must 
have been about 1589. 

We are in an era when the greatest thoughts that ` 
were ever conceived or expressed by the soul of man 
were being uttered on the Stage in dramatic form . |, 
an age of secrecy, craft, intrigue, political and religious 
strife, when religionists were butchering each other 
forgetful of the New Commandment which Masonry 


1 The phonetic sound is, of course, “Jachin”, the Fellowcraft 
Word. : 


c 33 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


was specially created to enforce . . . that ye Love one 
another. I 
Standing in thecentreof this wonderfully picturesque 


_yet terribly Tudor period, we can look up the pathway 
and about for a man who could have created out of 


the wreck of the old world myths, the crash of the 
operative craft, a new Ethical System that outbreathed 
Faith, Hope and Charity in place of strangulation by 
a Cable Tow. 

How can such a man be found? 

He can be found quite openly £y Masons who 
remember that “all squares, Levels and Perpendiculars 
are true and proper SIGNS to KNOW a Mason by.” 
He stands in a book which is the greatest of all secular 
books. For in the prefatory pages over the head of 
“THE AUTHOR” is printed SEVEN SET SQUARES 
that the Brethren might know that “Here is the 
MASTER that rules by the Square.” Yn the preface 
are the following significant phrases: 


“The meanest things are made more precious 
when dedicated to TEMPLES.” (Even the 
humble Tools of a Working Craft.) 

“Read him therefore again and yet again. . . . 
If you do not like him you are in some manifest 
danger not to understand him. . . . And so we 
leave you to other of his friends, whom, if you 
need, can be YOUR GUIDES. If you need 
them not you can lead yourselves and others. 
. . . And such Readers we wish him.” 


This Book is the Great sHAKESPEARE FOLIO of 1623, 
the book which openly proclaims for the first time in 
print that there lived a man who was a Freemason and 
who was the AUTHOR of the prays, for the writers of 
the Address refer to him in these memorable words: 


“So .WORTHY A... FELLOW aS was our 
SHAKESPEARE.” : 


34 





THE MYSTERY OF MODERN FREEMASONRY 


In the days when these words were written, a 
“Fellow” was a Mason; “a Worthy Fellow” was a 
Worthy Freemason. 

'The only mari who could.have written the Ritual, 
who could have conceived and established Freemasonry, 
who possessed all the necessary literary, ethical, social 
qualifications, etc., was the Immortal Bard, “William 
Shakespeare.” 

_An examination of the literary characteristics of the 
Ritual abundantly proves that it bears the peculiar 
hall-marks of the Elizabethan Era and has nothing in 
common with the Age of Pope, 1717. (See Chapter X.) 

The Freemasons emerged in 1723 because it was 
the centenary of the Great Folio, 1623, which reeks 
with Freemasonry. Bros. Anderson, Preston and 
Hutchinson (the first three Official Historians) 
knew the Secret. Author and by command left the 
knowledge in their works secretly by Elizabethan 
Rosicrosse methods, 


35 





II 


THE MYSTERY OF WILLIAM 
SHAKESPEARE 


*'] was PRosPER-0 the Prime (i.e. the First or the Head)... 
reputed in pienrry and for THE LIBERAL ARTS without 
a Parallel . . . having both the Key of oFFiceR and OFFICE 


all Dedicated to CLOSENESS.” THEOREMPRT. 


TUDENTS of the Elizabethan era are fully 

aware of the fact that some sort of a mystery 

veils the life of William Shakespeare. The 
average man knows nothing of his personality. The 
complete facts of the life of the reputed Author could 
be written on a small sheet of notepaper, so little is 
known ofhim. Large tomes of imaginative biographies 
have been written respecting him, but they are mainly 
conjectural. Sir Sidney Lee’s standard life reeks 
with “possible” and “probable” facts, etc. The Times 
reviewer said that this particular biography 


“had been twisted by the hand of a master artif, 

icer into the cunning semblance of a biography. 
_ Dr. Ward, Editor Cambridge History of English 
Literature, declares that "no biography which 
deserves any confidence has ever been constructed 
without a large infusion of the tell-tale words 
‘apparently,’ ‘probably,’ ‘there can be little 
doubt, ‘perhaps, and so forth.” 

The historian Hallam remarks that “all the 
insatiable curiosity and unwearied diligence 
hitherto detected about him serves rather to 
disappoint and perplex us. No letter of his 

36 








THE MYSTERY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


handwriting, no record of his conversations, no 
character of him drawn with any fullness by any 
contemporary has ever been produced.” 

Prof. Nichol says that “he passed through the. * 
world in umbra." 


No one has yet suggested that a part at least of 
this "mystery" was due to the fact that William 
Shakespeare was a Freemason, the centre of a Ring 
of Rosicrosse-Masons, and that he purposely seems to 
have lived his life as though his motto was “By the 
MIND alone shall I be seen.” 

Tt has never been suggested that the Author of the 
immortal plays may have regarded himself essentially 
aS AN ETHICAL TEACHER. For some time it has been 
the custom to believe that a play was tossed off for 
the “Globe” frequenters like an eagle might moult a 
feather . . . carelessly, without thought, merely for 
gain, with a rank indifference regarding the printing 
of his works or the preservation of his manuscripts. 

These views cannot be sustained. We know that 
from quarto to quarto (i.e. the small printed editions 
of the plays) until they were collected in the Great 
Folio he must have toiled over the plays with loving 
care . . . word by word and line upon line until 
they were as near human perfection as possible. The 
manuscripts, too, were placed in "sure wards of 
trust." "They were not destroyed. They were care- 
fully preserved by the Brethren who published the 
1623 Folio. This fact is made quite clear by the 
curious preface to Troilus and Cressida, published in 
quarto in 1609. 

We are told that the play had never been played... 


“never clapper-clawed with the palms of the 
vulgar . . . never sullied with the smoky breath 
of the multitude. . . . Thank Fortune for ihe 
ESCAPE ii (i.c. the play) hath made among you 


37 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF F REEMASONRY 


since dy the GRAND POSSESSORS’ WILLS 
I believe you should have prayed for THEM 
rather than been prayed.” 


We heré have the somewhat remarkable fact that 
the Author who was supposed to have written all 
his plays for the stage for profits to be drawn from 
the acting, writes a play which is never acted but 
printed so that any company of players may produce it. 
The play is a profound utterance upon statecraft 
quite over the heads of the "Globe" audiences. . 

The fact that concerns us most as Freemasons is 
this: that it declares that the original manuscripts of 
this play—and other comedies too—have passed 
out of his hands and are held by some GRAND 
POSSESSORS. The writer of the preface speaks of 
"the escape it hath made”—i.e. its escape out of the 
hands of the-Grand Possessors—who were unwilling 
to let it escape. The inference is that the “Grand 
Possessors’ Wills” were opposed to letting “tHem”— 
the other comedies—be published. 

Charles Knight says: 


"It is difficult to understand but... we 
learn that the copy had an escape from some 
Powerful possessors. It appears to us that these 
possessors were powerful enough to prevent a 
single copy . .. being produced . . . till after 
his death; and that . . . until the publication of 
-the Folio in 1623, ;hey continued the exercise of 
their power. . . . The fourteen plays published 
in his lifetime . . . were authorised &y some 
power having the right to prevent publication... 
till the 1623 Folio.” 


There has never been any reasonable suggestion by 
any Shakespearian authority who the Grand Possessors 
were who held Troilus and Cressida, who held the 
Shakespeare manuscripts, who printed the Great Folio, 


38 


eek 














THE MYSTERY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 
and who buried the manuscripts again in secret until 


-in the fulness of time they can perhaps be given to 


the world: neither has any commentator defined the 
relationship which must have existed between the 
Author and the Grand Possessors. It is easy to see 
that the preface has been written to leave a record that . 
there were GRAND POSSESSORS who held the 
manuscripts. 

At the present time there is not a single manuscript 
of the plays of Shakespeare to be found anywhere, 
There is not a single vestige of his handwriting 
in connection with literature. There is not an odd 
chip of all the debris of his literary workshop. The 
complete disappearance of everything is too complete 
to be natural. "The inference can be drawn that the 
Grand Possessors were nothing less than the litera: 
school of Rosicrosse-Masons of which Shakespeare 
was the Founder and that such manuscripts, etc., 
were left to the custody of a succession of hands from 
the Elizabethan era onwards. ‘This alone explains the 
placing of the Set Squares over the head of Tur 
AUTHOR and the declaration of the Editors that he 
was “a WORTHY FELLOW,” for they, too, were “Worthy 
Fellows.” 

There can be no possible doubt that Shakespeare 
regarded himself as an ETHICAL TEACHER, This fact 
at once explains his connection with Freemasonry, 
In the plays we have great Epics of Moral Passion 
against the crying evils of the times. They are more 
than Works of Art. They are tremendous sermons 
of Power couchéd in a very different form from pulpit 
utterance. ‘They have been preached under varying 
conditions almost nightly for three hundred years. 
The text of King Lear is Ingratitude; of Othello, 
Jealousy; of Macheth, Unscrupulous Ambition, etc. 

Not content with merely preaching his views on - 
the stage, Shakespeare put his Ethical Principles into 
activity by founding Speculative Masonry, based on 


39 


n 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


CHARITY (the Brotherhood of Man and the Fatherhood 
of God), and the recognition of the Great Architect of 
the Universe. He once more introduced the principle 
of Love—ix a New Form—in an age which gave us 
the massacre of St, Bartholomew, the fires of Smith. 
field, the torturing of Papists. 

The new Cult was naturally a secret ons, Had 
there been the slightest suspicion that such a latitu- 
dinarian movement was being born as “the Religion 
of all coop men and TRUE,” the Brethren would have 
been the victims immediately of Protestant and 


Catholic intolerance, ' The Brethren were necessarily ` 


Sworn to secrecy on the ‘very practices of the Era . `. 
the barbarous punishments of hanging, drawing, 
quartering, etc. The Third Degree Penal Sign— 
with its return to the centre—carried with it a very 
solemn and grim reminder to our ancient Elizabethan 
Brother who had heard the agonized shrieks of victims 
in the public highway at Charing Cross, that a careless 
word might result in imprisonment, the thumbscrew 
and the rack, 

Shakespeare was necessarily a CONCEALED MAN, 
The Brethren who protected him were also concealed 


used sroxs outside the Lodge in a variety of cunning 
methods, even in printed books, as the Masonic 
Movement spread and became international, By the 
Elizabethan Brethren “great Bases were laid for 


` ETERNITY” in many ways, by the publishing of text- 


books of general knowledge, translations, etc, They 
bequeathed their “Mystery” to the succeeding genera- 
tion, the chief Secrets being preserved by the Heads 
of the Secret Fraternity, the Rosicrosse-Masons, 
Through subsequent generations a succession of hands 


40 





y 











THE MYSTERY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


left the fact that they were of the Rosicrosse in their 
books secretly. From Shakespeare to De Quincey 
(1785-1859) cunning signals appear to indicate the 
Founder’s identity, 


Apart from the fact that it would have been worse 


than useless to have made public the birth of an 


enter into this little work, Suffice it to say that in 


his personal diary, Shakespeare's Sonnets, the Author 
States that he has been — - 


“made LAME through Fortune’s dearest Spite,” 
“My name has received a BRAND.” 

“Vulgar SCANDAL stamped upon my srow.” 
“Weigh how once I suffered in your crime,” 


"I Authorise thy Trespass, . . , My Self 
CORRUPTING salving thy Amiss,” 


Enough has been said to indicate that the “Con- 
cealed Life” of the Author was a necessity of the 
times. The tragedy in his life (he became the public 
Scapegoat for the sins of another) made it also 
imperative that his Secret activities as a Founder of a 


1 The first edition of Shakespeare’s Sonnets given openly to the 
world was in 1640. It is known as the “Benson Medley." ‘There 
was a Quarto of Shakespeare’s Sonnets numbered “1609” which 
was published to the Brethren secretly in 1625 containing six more 
Sonnets than the 1640 edition and of a different order. "The world 
did not know of the existence of this (1609) edition until Geo. Steevens 
reprinted it in 1766 and Malone drew attention to it in 1788, pointing 
out the moral issues involyed in such a personal record. ‘There is 
indisputable Proof of the publication of the Sonnets after the 1623 
akespeare was 
never guilty of the “sins” attributed to him by some of his most ardent 
admirers. (For this aspect of the question see "The Alfred Dodd 
Edition of the Sonnets,” Daily Post, Liverpool.) 


41 


A TU MT Cu S y 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONR Y 
New System of Ethics should not be known lest it 


militated against the success of the Fraternity. In - 


the Sonnets is a direct instruction to the Brethren that 
his connection with the Craft had to be kept as a 
close secret, 


"Forget me. . . . Let my NAME BE BURIED where my 
Body is, 
And live no more to sname nor me, nor you. ... 
For I AM sHamED. ... You in me can Nothing 
WORTHY Prove. Sonnet Lxx1I (149). 

When Freemasonry emerged in 1717, the heads of 
the emergence who were the successors of the 
Elizabethan Rosicrosse and had had the secrets handed 
down to them, were desperately anxious that the 
name of the Founder should not be associated with 
the genesis of the Order, lest controversy arose on a 
personal issue and the emergence of the ethical 
cult was killed in the open thoroughfares of the world 
by bitter attacks on the personality of the Creator by 
self-constituted champions of morals, theologies, state 
policies. 

Dr. Anderson and the 1717 Brethren sent the world 
looking for “Origins” among the illiterate operatives 
of Feudalism. In that arid wilderness some scholars 
are still looking even to-day, despite Bro. Hutchinson’s 
assurance (the third Official Historian) in 1776— 
when the success of the Fraternity was assured—that: 


“Our Ceremonies and Mysteries were derived 
from the Rites, Ceremonies and Institutions of 
the Ancients, and some of them from the 
remotest Áges. . . . The name of mason has 
NO RELATION TO ARCHITECTS,” 

(The Spirit of Masonry.) 


1 "The Sonnets in the 1609 quarto had a secret order. "The quarto 
number was xxn. 'The manuscript number was 149. Hence 
the quotation of two numbers. 


42 














THE MYSTERY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


Bro. Hutchinson does not tell the world openly 
jes were DERIVED, but he adds that: 


how our ceremoni 
“Our Ceremonials . , * HAVE NO RELATION 


TO BUILDING AND ARCHITECTURE, but are 
EMBLEMATICAL,” 


and on Rosicrosse lines he slips in the name of the 
Founder who had re-created the Ancient Mysteries 
in a modern setting. 

_ The 1723 world took the Book of Constitutions with 
its legendary tissue of anachronisms as the genuine 
tenets of the Speculative Art, thinking that the System 
had simply “Growed like Topsy.” Speculation 
was rampant whether it had directly descended from 
the Mysteries, the Roman Collegia, the Jewish Cabbala, 
the Knights Templar, the Medieval Trade Gild. 
When or how the Fraternity had changed its creedal 
Trinitarianism or Pagan Garments for the one Great 
Architect, and the Apron (Jason’s Golden Fleece) with 
the white Robes of Theosophic Mysticism, the 1723 
world never discovered. 

In their Lodges the 1723 Masons sang lustily: 
"We have imposed on those who make a Pother." 

They had, 

Dr. Anderson and the Grand Lodge had successfully 
carried out instructions, The Founder’s “wame” had 
been “BURIED” out of sight under a mass of extraneous 
speculations and partially connived at “Exposures,” 
Freemasonry was apparently conceived, shaped and 
born without a FATHER or MOTHER and without any 
directing mind. The character of the Founder was 


more than men do to-day. 


With the passing of the years, Dr, Anderson could 
arad to say in the Second. Edition of the Constitutions, 
1739, 


43 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


"Most regular Societies have had and always 
will have their Secrets; and to be sure the 
Freemasons always had theirs which they never 
divulged in manuscript; and cannot therefore be 
expected in Print, but an EXPERT BROTHER 
ty THE TRUE LIGHT can readily find many 
USEFUL HINTS on almost every page of the Book 
Which . . . others not initiated cannot discover... 

“But the History here chiefly concerns Masonry 
without meddling with other transactions more than 
what serves to connect the History of Masonry 
with the subject of the Book. It is good to know 
WHAT NOT TO SAY.” 


This very remarkable statement suggests quite 
plainly that there was a Prime Secret connected with 
the Genesis of the Fraternity and that “Ints” 
respecting it have been written in secretly that can 
be understood not by “Cowans,” but by the 
“INITIATED,” - ; 

No Masonic Historian has told the Brethren what 
this Secret is likely to be. There have never been any 
efforts made to elucidate the “Hints” that are to be 
found “on almost every page;” or to tell an inquirer 
what is “THE TRUE LIGHT;” or what is the DEGREE 
Which makes an "Expert Brother" and qualifies him so 
that, esoterically, he may read the secrets of a printed 
Page. Bro. Anderson lets it be definitely known that 
there is other knowledge known to him which trenches 
on Masonry, but he does not “MEDDLE” with such 
knowledge for it constitutes “other transactions” 
which are better left unsaid openly in a history of 
Freemasonry. “Hints” secretly are permissible, but, 
OPENLY . . . "IT I5 GOOD TO KNOW WHAT NOT TO 
sAY." Bro. Anderson throws up the phrase in capitals 
to emphasize its importance, : 

The “other transactions" referred to the fact that 
other issues were involved besides the identity of the 


44 
























THE MYSTERY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


Founder, his character, his reason for concealment, 
etc. 

The “Hints’—some at least—were afterwards 
called by Bro. Preston, “the arr oF CHANGES,” and by 
Bro. Hutchinson, “the science OF ABRAC,” a System of 
numerical Cyphers used by the Rosicrosse (through 
many printed works) from the 162 3 Folio to Anderson 
onwards, 

Very detailed elaborate evidence and proofs can be 
produced on the foregoing lines, but enough has 
already been adduced to indicate that around the 
Secrets of Masonry thereis a “prime SECRET” connected 
with the orner which centres round the Creator of 
the Craft who is esoterically the “LOST WORD” of 
the DEGREE acquainted with his Secrets. 


45 





II 
FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


"I am a BROTHER of a GRACIOUS ORDER late come from 


” 
the sza, MEASURE FOR MEASURE. 


Y À YE are now certainly justified in asking . . . 
Was William Shakespeare a Freemason? 

We have seen that the Editors of the 

1623 Folio pointedly declare that he was "A WORTHY 

FELLOW" and enjoin the reader to read him again and 


yet again lest he be in danger of being misunderstood. 


It is an open hint that there may be more behind his 


words and phrases than appears on the surface, 

However much we may wish to associate the 
Author with Freemasonry it is totally insufficient 
to conclude that Shakespeare was a Mason on the 
strength of a word that might bear a different inter- 
pretation. The word “Fellow” Las many different 
meanings—a graduate of a University or even “a 
Person of no estimation, a disreputable character; or 
as a term of familiarity, such as “a jolly fellow, , etc. 
Nevertheless the term “Fellow” was used in medieval 
times to signify particularly one who was a Mason. It 
is used in Freemasonry to-day to signify the same 
thing . . . a Mason of a certain Degree. 

` The initial difficulty is to ascertain. whether the 
Editors of the Folio used the word with a Masonic ' 
significance or not .. . whether they wrote it as 
Masons to Masons. . 

In Shakespeare's work there is a literary subtlety 
known to all students . . . the deliberate employment 


46 





FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


of words which are diamond-like and flash different 
meanings. He never seems to use a word unless he 
knew its full derivative strength. He thus packed 
his full, expansive thought in a single word or phrase 
which can be examined from different angles. The 
context usually tells the emphasis to be placed on the 
leading interpretation. 

The Folio Editors follow the same literary methods. 

If the word “Fellow” stood by itself it could be 
reasonably passed by as having no particular signifi- 
cance; but when’ we find the significant adjective 
“worTuy” attached, the combination “A WORTHY 
FELLOW” ought to give any student of Masonic 
Origins pause. When we see the time-honoured 
appellation of “Worthy” associated with a word which 
may also have been written masonically, we can 
reasonably assume that the complete phrase may have 
been used primarily in a Masonic sense, and that it was 
covertly slipped into the “uninstructed world” which 
could not realise its significance. 

It is exactly how we Masons might expect such an 
announcement to be made . . . a covert hint, a veiled 
allusion, a secret truth wrapped up in an innocent 
phrase. The combination has not hitherto been noticed 
because we modern Freemasons have forgotten how 
to take a hint. We are so concerned with making 
“a determined stand against unhistorical claims and 
unscientific pretensions” (L, Vibert) that we have 
become too negligent to look for “those marks by which 
we are known to each other and distinguished from the 
rest of the world” (The Ritual). We pass over the 
"SET-SQUARES"' associated with the Author; we equally 
forget that the sacred number seven is of profound 
significance to the Fraternity; we are equally blind 
to the two Capital Letters on the first Folio page, 
placed by themselves, which would have designated to 
an Elizabethan Brother the two Pillars of Masonry 
“B,J.” whatever else they may have veiled. 


47 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Assuming that there are veiled suggestions in these 
cryptic words, phrases and signs, an examination of 
the Folio ought to contain at least prima facie evidence 
pointed and distinct of Freemasonry, veiled yet clear 
enough to be understood by Masons. Such Masonic 
fragments would necessarily be embodied in the plays 
in such a manner as to arouse no suspicion . . . yet 


THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY 


The Epiftle Dedicatorie. 
untotheir parent, Theresa great difference yobether any "Boe 
choofe his Patrones, or finde thems:T bis hath done both. For, 
Jo much were your LL. likings of the feucrall parts, vyhen 
they werealled as before they were publifbed, the Volume askd to 
beyours. Hc haue but colletted ther» and done an offtce_to the 
dead, topracure hrs Orphanes, Guardians, voithout ambition ei- 


ther of felfe-profit, or fame :onely to kpe the memory of fo worthy 
they ought to be plain enough to be recognized when * a Friend > Fellowakucaswasour Sa akes pear bby ban 
taken out of their hidi ng-pla ces b y the “discernin g "t ble offer of bis playes, to your moff noble, patronage, Wherein, as 
reader.” C0 We haue wfily obferued, no man tocome ncere your L.L. but woth 
i i ~ akndofr relgious addreffe it bath bin the height of our care, vvho 
Lord Campbeli looked for Law in the plays and ¥ — arethe Profenters,tomake the prefent cii your H.H. bythe 
found it, c oming to the ultimate conclusion that the vt perfetton.But,there we muft alfo crane our abilities tobe confiderd, 
: ‘Author was learned in the Law. He wrote: “omy Lords. We cannot £0 beyond our owne powers. Country hands 
. . ^ reach foorth mitke, creame, friites, or what they baue : and. many 
“What is more remarkable i nS hakesp eare's * rai e heard) that AM (qpmmes €7 iucenfe obtat-. 
* wo ned their requefts witba lcauenci Cake. b vvar no fault toapproch 
fondness for Law Terms 1s that whenever he “ther Gods, by what meanes they could: eAnd the mof, anib 
i indulges this propensity he. unifi ormly lays down ^ — meaneflof things are made more precious, when they are dedicated 
GOOD LAW.” et — toTemples, Jnthat name therefore, we moft bumbly confecrate to 
your HH. thefes remaines of your fernant Shakelpeare - [^ 

7 7 ; x nd peare ; tat 
Nothing less than this standard can satisfy a Masonic @ what delights in them» may beener your L.L..the- reputation 
student, ^ — bns éy the faults ours f any be committed by a Porc» focarcfullto 

. . Ice 2 ji i 7 

If the Folio embodies the principles of Masonry, ae _ Poors thew gratitude bath sothe kung and tbe died, asi 


we ought naturally to expect secret signs and signals, 
cover-words that look innocent, and double-meaning 
phraseology; yet this should be so unmistakably clear 
as to leave no shadow of doubt. Shakespeare, in fact, 
should prove himself to be a Mason, not merely by 
his philosophy, but. by his systematic use of certain 
peculiar Masonic Knowledge, by phrase, fable and sign, 
if we are to accept the “Worthy Fellow” term, the 
"Set-Squares" and the “B,J.” as possessing Masonic 
significance. 

In our search it must be remembered that Masonry 
is SECRET KNOWLEDGE known to the few. It has never 


Your Lordthippes moft bounden, 


Touwn Hemtnee, 
Henry Convent, 


From Secret Shakespearian Seals, 





been on parade before the eyes of the world. It has 
hitherto been unsuspected in the plays and has never 
been looked for. It will be found that the Poet had 
such a reservoir of Masonic lore that it is incorporated 
as naturally in the plays as are the open branches of 


"The above is from the second page of The Epistle Dedicatory, and the count 
is again 287. The first page of The Epistle counts 157. 


Piare HI 
48 (See page 193) 





LJ EM M I S 


um ae ee ai aioi 





“THE NAMES OF THE PRINCIPALL ACTORS” FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


knowledge . . . medicine, heraldry, history, 
lore, law, etc. 





classical 


n llowi ; : Aou: 
The Workesof William Shakelp eare, The fo owing Masonic allusions indicate that 


Shakespeare had a positive knowledge that in his da 


y 
there were actually Secret Orders with thei 


r Signs 
and Symbols. They are simple and cumulative and 


leave no possible doubt of their conjoined significance. 


containing all his Comedies, Hiftories, and 
Tragedies: Truely fet forth, according to their firft 
ORJGINALL. . 





The Names of the Principall A@ors — z 


md ee aga, _ .THE MASONIC ALLUSIONS IN 
# ~ MASONIC ALLUSIONS IN 


E FA liliam Shakefpeare, 7 \ SamnelGilburne, 7 


THE PLAYS 
chard’ ‘Burbadge, ^ | Robertafrmin, 7 ——— 





Jobn Hemmings 7 | MiliamOfle, — A KNOWLEDGE OF NOBLE ORDERS AND 
ohn Hemmings, Ha! * 
Magis Phil 7 | Nathan Feld, 7 FRATERNITIES. 
Wiliam Kent “8 \ FobnUnderwood, I am a BROTHER of a GRACIOUS ORDER late 
ape , A come from the sza, 
Thonn Pope. * e: T : : Measure for Measure, Act III, last scene. 
rge Bryan. ^ | William Eccleftone. 7 y . 3 
rie 2 | FofipbTalr. z But stay awhile. What COMPANY is this? 
entry . ^ 2 
Willam She. 1 | Robert Benfield, Taming of the Shrew, Act I, s. 2. 
i ly. ^b | Robert Goughe. Az I will, as twere a BROTHER OF YOUR ORDER 
IN * PIER n Visit both PRINCE and PEOPLE. 
Te re M Ee io Measure for Measure, Act I, s. 4. 
amueli roffe, A 
Alexander Cooke. LAN ihn Rice, 7 THE WORK OF MASONS. . 
Ont bp p ' The SINGING MASONS building Roofs of Gold. 
EL Henry F, Act Y, s. 1. 
From Secret Shakespearian Seals, 3 


THE FOUNDER OF THE TEMPLE. 
And Profound SOLOMON. 
. Love’s Labours Lost, Act 4, s. 3. 


The count once more is 287, the Roman Letters being arranged so that when 
they are subtracted from the Italics the necessary number is totalled; such sub- 
tracting and adding is all part of the game of mystification. 


THE PATRON SAINT OF MASONRY. 
Now dy ST. JOHN that news is bad indeed. 
Richard IIT, Act I, s. 2. 
Prats IV D 49 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE BRETHREN. 


What Hallowing and what stir is this to-day ? 
These are my MATES. 
The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act V, s. 1. 


A MASCULINE FRATERNITY. 


And that no woman has, nor never none 
Shall Mistress be of it. 


Twelfth Night, Act III, s. r. 


THE LODGE. 
Both are at THE LODGE. 
Titus Andronicus, Act YI, s. 4. 


Doth any particular name belong unto she Lodging? 
"Tis called JERUSALEM. 
Henry 1, Act V, s. 1. 


THE CRAFT. 
This is a WORSHIPFUL SOCIETY. 
King John, Act I, s. 1. 


THE APRON MEN. 


You have made good work, you and your APRON 
MEN. 
Coriolanus, Act IV, s. 6. 


THE CHAIRS OF THE LODGE. 
The Several CHAIRS of ORDER, look you. 
The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act V, s. 1. 


THE HEAD OF THE LODGE. 
What! My old WORSHIPFUL MASTER! 
Taming of the Shrew, Act V, s. 1. 
50 


"THE JUNIOR WARDEN. 





FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


BY COMMAND OF THE W.M. 
I have ever squanzD me to thy Counsel. 
The Winter's Tale, Act HI, s. 3. 
THE TYLER. 


Guard the Door WITHOUT. Let him not Pass. 
Kill him rather. 


Othello, Act V, s. 2. 


He fetches in our woop and serves in OFFICES 
that profit us. 


The Tempest, Act I, s. 1. 


Where is sky LEATHER APRON and thy RULE ? 
Julius Cesar, Act I, s. 1. 


SQUARE CONDUCT, ETC. 


I have not kept my SQUARE, but that to come 
shall all be done ży RULE 


Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, s. 1. 
They never meet, but they do sovanz. 
4 Midsummer Night's Dream, Act II, s. 1. 


THE PREPARED CANDIDATE. 


I shall stay here the for-horse to 4 SMOCK (an 
Apron), 


Creaking my SHOES on the PLAIN MASONRY, 
All’s Well that Ends Well, Act II, last scene. 


Be patient . . . I'll bring thee... HOODWINK 
this... 


Speak softly. . . . This is the Mouth of THE 
CELL... 


No more. . . . ENTER. 
The Tempest, Act IV. 
51 

















SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE CABLE-Tow. 
His NECK shall come to your WAIST, a CORD 
Sir. 


Measure for Measure, Act III, s. 5. 


- (As the Initiate kneels a 


t the Pedestal with the 
-.round . , .) 


THE THREE KNOCKS. 


Knock, Knock, Knock. Who's where ? 
Knock, Knock, Knock, Who’s there ? 
KNOCK, KNock, Knock, . . 


Macbeth, Act Il, s. 5. 


THE W.M. AND THE INITIATE. 
Solemn and Strange Music. 
the Top Invisible, 


The Tempest (see Folio P. 13, 
THE PERAMBULATION. 


Here’s a maze trod indeed through FORTH-RIGHTS 
(straight paths) and MEANDERS (a Circling Round), 


The Tempest, Act II, s. 3. 


MASTER PROSPER-O on 


stage direction), 


THE VOW. 


KNEEL and REPEAT IT. 
MUM then and no more, 


The Tempest, Act Ill, s. 2. 


Come SWEAR to that. KISS THE BOOK. 
x The Tempest, Act Il, s. 1. 


I wil stand, . . 


Your oarus are past, and now subscribe your 
NAMES, 


That his own Hand may strike his HONOUR down 
That FIOLATES the smallest branch therein, 


52 








FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


I can but Say . . . I HAVE ALREADY SWORN, 
I BREAK FAITH this WORD shall break for me, 


Love's Labours Lost, Act T, s. x. 
THE PENALTY. 


Now go and tell, and if thy rououg can speak, 
Who "twas that cut thy TONGUE. 


Titus Andronicus, Act I 


CHOP OFF y OUR HAND. . 
RANSOM for thy Fault, 


Titus Andronicus, Act III, s. r. 
THE WARDENS’ TEST. 
Now... WHENCE COME TOU? 
The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act IV, s. 5, 


Let’s PART THE FORD... 
Nol I'll not be your HALF. 


Love's Labours Lost, Act IV, s, 5. 


> S. 5. 
- - That shall be 


Thou speakest like him that has been Untutored TO 
REPEAT. 
Pericles, Act I1, s. 4. 
MASONIC SPEECH, ` 
l'Il SQUARE my talk. 
Titus Andronicus, Act III, s. 2, 


In thy DUMB ACTION, I will be as Perfect. 
Titus Andronicus, Act IIT, s. 2. 
THE CHARITY TEST. 


If but one of urs PO 


SKETS could speak, would it 
« ies” 
not say, “He Lies. 


The Tempest, Act Il, s. 1. 
53 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF F REEMASONRY 
The Gods requite his CHARITY, 
Pericles, Act 1H, s. 2. 


THE DISTINGUISHING BADGE. 


LAMBSKINS to signify TET CRpm being richer 
than INNOCENCY. 


Measure for Measure, Act II I, s. x. 


AN ECHO OF THE INVESTITURE. 


Not the King's Crown, nor she deputed SWORD, 
The Marshall’s Truncheon, nor the Judge’s ROBE 
Become them with one half so good a grace, 


Measure for Measure, Act Il, s. 5. 


Jove’s Bird, she ROMAN EAGLE. 
Cymbeline, Act IV, s. 2. 


THE IN STRUCTION OF THE CANDIDATE, 
Take, then, this your coMPANION by the hand, 
Who hath a Story ready for your Ear! 
REMEMBER, now, my BROTHER, 

Cymbeline, Act V, last scene, 
Note.— There was a custom as late as the eighteenth 

Century for an experienced Brother to take the newly- 

made Mason into an adjoining room, rehearse him 

in what he had been told, how to enter, and how to 
leave, etc. On their return, he was presented; and 


the ceremony thus interrupted, was continued to the 
end. 


THE MASONIC SYMBOL. 
Like to the carrer COMPASSE in a RING. ow 
The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act V, s. 5. 
54 





FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 
CRAFT COLOURS. 


-.. In Emrold tuffes .. PURPLE, BLUE 
and WHITE, 


Like Saphire pearls, and Rich EMBROIDERY . , , 
Buckled below fair Knighthood’s bending Knee, 
The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act V, s. s. 


THE HAMMER AND APRON. 


Here, Robin, and if die, I give thee MY APRON: 
And Will shall have my HAMMER +. . and 


od in Fustice hath revealed the TRUTH and 
INNOCENCE of this poor FELLOW. 


Henry VI, Pt. 2, Áct II, s. 3- 
THEP...w...: 
I thank thee good TUBAL. 
The Merchant of Venice, Act II, s. r. 
THE YOUNG MASON. 


Is there no youn 
with him . , 


Much Ado About Nothing, Act 1, s. r. 
THE SIGN CASUAL. 


The paper as the Body of my FRIEND, 
Every WORD in it a GAPING WOUND issuing 
Life Blood. 
The Merchant of Venice, Act IIl, s. 2. 


A BROTHER TO HIRAM. 


The TYRE-Faliant or any Tire of Venetian 
Admittance, 


The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act III, s. 5. 
Note that Hiram Abif came from Tyre along with 
Hiram King of Tyre . . . a home of the Ancient 
Mysteries, : 


€ SQUARER that will make a Voyage 
p 


55 












SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


HIRAM’S vow. 
Or they shall sear out my Brains with BILLETS. 
Measure for Measure, Act IV, s. 3 


THE WHISPERED WORD AND GRIP. 


They WHISPER one another JN THE EAR; 
and he that speaks doth crasp the Hearer’s 
WRIST. 


King John, Act IV, s. 2. 


THE DARKNESS AND HIRAM. 


The prince of DARKNESS is a GENTLEMAN . , s 
Modo he's called and Mahu. ... 


King Lear, Act II], s, 4^ 


Note that the Author corrupts the true words of 
the Third Degree in order not to reveal them, just 


them “Matchpin” and “Maughbin.” - 
Shakespeare thus lets it be known that he knew two 
words were employed “having the same signification.” 
The “W.M.” is, of course, a “Prince of Darkness” 
in the Third Degree . . . and a “GENTLEMAN” hot 
an operative mason. 
This is clear evidence not only of Shakespeare’s 


Masonry, but that Speculative Masonry was confined 
to “Gentlemen” of Culture. 


THE POINT FROM WHICH A MASTER 
MASON CANNOT ERR. 
I will rind where TRUTH is Hid 
Though it were up indeed 
WITHIN THE CENTRE, 
Hamlet, Act II, 8. 2. 
56 


7 and “ELDER MASTERS OF KNOWN HONO 




















FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


PROVINCIAL HONOURS. 
He will ug YOUR APRon WITH GOLD. 
Pericles, Act IV, s. 6, 
THE ROYAL ARCH. 
Who will play THE SCRIBE... ? With signs 


and TOKENS. . 


Titus Andronicus, Act IT, s. 4. 


REPORT what a SOYO URNER we have. 
Pericles, Act IV, s. 2. 
In The Winter's Tale is actually a reference to 
"Warden Pies," Every Mason knows that the 
Junior Warden’s Office deals Primarily with the 
banqueting aspects of the Craft, 
cre are numerous allusions 


in the plays to 
“Worthy Masters,” Potent Master: 


s, Good Masters 


3 UR" which can 
be taken as referring to Past Masters, 


Generally Speaking, wherever there is a word or a 


of thought can 


be dissociated when One understands this particular 


aspect of Shakespeare’s “LIVING arr.” 


single instance wil] Suffice to 
remarkable truth so far as th 


57 


indicate this 
€ thread of Masonry is 









SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


concerned. The Great Folio is saturated with similar 
examples, 

In Hamlet, Act Il, s. 1, Folio page 259, col. 2, 
line 21, the play leads up to the entrance of Ophelia 
who is distressed beyond measure, Coming to tell her 
father how Hamlet had visited her and affrighted her . 
by his bearing. Through all this word-play, however, 
there is a secret message which runs: “Odserve an 
Luitiation Worthy Freemason,” etc. Ophelia’s words 
are framed on a situation which has been seen many 
a time by the Brethren, the nervous Candidate entering 
the Lodge Room with fear and trembling . . . in 
déshabillé, . . . When the “padding” in the open text 
is cut away, the Masonic allusions in Ophelia's speech 
with Polonius are revealed unerringly. 


Potontus anp OPHELIA 


A A And thus doe we of wisedom.., 
(Line 21.) 

WORTHY W 

BROTHER w.B. | By indirections Sinde directions out : 

So by my former Lecture and 

SACRED advice 

SYMBOL $5. | Shall you my SONNE; You have 

me have you not ? 

MASON M. MyLord.., 
THE GRAND God... 
GEOMETRICIAN G.c. 1G 


A WORTHY BROTHER’S SAGRED 
SYMBOL : THE GRAND GEOMETRICIAN, 
MASON 
Note.—The Capital Initials of the lines were 


Specially selected by Shakespeare because these Letters 
in these particular combinations, are based on the 


58 








FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


Ritual Cypher Code of Letters used by the Free- 
masons to-day: “S.S.” means “The Sacred Symbol,” 
etc. We get inserted in this passage a message in the 
open text that refers to the Lectures which used to be 
given in the Masonic Lodges in the Elizabethan Era 
—and are still given in some Lodges to-day—and also 
the fact that it refers to a “Second Degree” Lecture 
which is governed by the Symbol “G” “My Former 
Lecture” clearly indicates ‘the Lecture of the First 
(E.A.) Tracing’ Board, Shakespeare links the first 
Degree with his next lines: 


OBSERVE Observe his In..i.ation . . . 

: (Line 29.) 
INITIATION Iz 
AN [cuu or 


musicke. . , 


Enter (Stage direction), 
WORTHY W 
FREEMASON W.F, |F 
Hol Ho.... 


MASTER Awm. |M 


LORD HAM Lord uam . . , with his doublet 
all unbrac’d, 

(No war upon his head, his 
Stockings foul'd 

UNGARTRED, AND DOWNE GIVED 
to his ANCKLE, 

Pale as his shirt, his knees 
knocking each other 


A. A 
WORSHIPFUL W 


PUN PUN 


A A And with a looke so Pitious in 
purport 

AS As if he had been loosed out 
of Hell, 

TO 


To speake of Horrors: He 
comes before me, 


59 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


MASTER M... : 
MASONS M.M. |M 


What... 

He tooke me by the WRIST, 
and held me Hard. . . . 
He seemed to EINDE his way 
WITHOUT HIS EYES. 
Goe with mel I wil] goe 
SEEKE THE KING.~.. 


HO! WORTHY FREEMASON! OBSERVE 
AN INITIATION! A WORSHIPFUL 
MASTER; LORD HAM—AS A PUN—TO 
MASTER MASONS! 


In the open text is an excellently veiled account of 
the manners and customs in vogue to-day at an 


Initiation. “ug STOCKINGS UNGARTERED AND DOWN-. 


GIVED TO HIS ANKLE,” etc., is quite sufficient to indicate 
that the Author modelled his recital on what he had 
actually witnessed in actual Lodge working. The 
Capital Initials are equally significant in their import 
for they again betray a perfect knowledge of the 
Masonic Ritual Letter Code. The “Pun” round the 
word “Ham” is not very apparent in our present slight 
knowledge of the esoteric ways of the Elizabethan 
Brethren. It was probably well understood by them 
and light may some day be thrown upon the subject. 

The scattered quotations from the plays indicate at 
least that Shakespeare was familiar with the fact of 
Secret Orders and Fraternities, He knew definite 
Lodge Words like Solomon and Tubal and was aware 
that among Freemasons there were penalties, swearing 
and kissing a Book, the “Three Knocks”, perambula- 


1 Note—Some further examples of the Ritual Letter Code 
together with the Author’s "direction? authorizing the reader to 
examine such Initial Capitals and for the "Pruning" of the text in 
order to reveal an “UNDER MESSAGE," will be found in Chapter VII. 


60 





FREEMASONRY IN THE FOLIO 


tions and the Masonic custom of lettering and parting 
a Word. He knew that TRUTH is hidden within tHe 
CENTRE, that the Third Degree word j 


© corrupts the actual Word, giving the first Capital 


D e 
of the “Scribe E,” and the “Sojourner,” : 


. The average reader will, I am Sure, agree that there 
Is already sufficient evidence to Warrant the student 


THREE DEGREE Rite alleged by Modernists to have 
been FABRICATED by the 1717 Grand Lodge?  . 


61 












































Iv 
THE HIRAM LEGEND 


“Here lies your BROTHER no better than the Earth he Lies 
upon, 
If he is THAT which now He is like . . . ng qs DEAD." 


THE TEMPEST. 


VERY Masonic historian has pondered the 
E Story of Hiram and the problem of its 
incorporation into the crude rite of an operative 
craft. "Beginning with the fatal assumption that 
Speculative Freemason began in operative Lodges 
and that the Ethical Čale “evolved” —(ignoring the 
Patent historic fact that the operative gild union was 
swept away by successive Acts of Parliament before we 
ad a modern language in which a modern Ritual could 
be imaginatively expressed)—every Masonic scholar has 
signally failed to indicate WHO created the Hiram 
Legend or wien it was created, 
Itis abundantly clear that someone with a knowledge 
of Hermetic Rites and the Ancient Mysteries created 
the Story as a piece of imaginative fiction and that it 


their Gods. In those Ancient Days the Candidate 
took the place of the God as the Initiate does to-day 
in the Modern Mystery. a ] 
There is thus a parallel between the Ancient Rite 
and the Modern One. 
Bro. Pike says that in 1717: 


62 


THE HIRAM. LEGEND 


“In one of the Four Old Lodges were Squires, 
Noblemen, Military Officers, Scholars, Philo- 
sophers, Clergymen. To these men must be 
ascribed the authorship of the Third Degree and 


the introduction of Hermetic and other Symbols 
in Masonry.” 


That scholars were members of such a Lodge is 
capable of direct proof, but it is not capable of proof 
that these men—acting apparently as a Committee 
created the THIRD DEGREE. It is pure guess-work on 
the part of Bro. Pike. It is, moreover, quite impossible 


executed. There has never been a Committee yet that 
has produced a great Work of Art, 

The reader will, however, have already noted that 
not only has it been proved by direct evidence that 
there was more than ONE DEGREE worked by the 


. Brethren prior to 1717 (see Chapter I), but that in 


the Shakespeare Folio there seems to be circumstantial 
evidence that Suggests a knowledge by the Author 
of the Hiram Story alleged by Modernists to be 
unknown prior to 1717. ; 

As a matter of fact, the Masonic commentator who 
believes that Speculative Masonry grew out of an 
Operative trinitarian formula, cannot even suggest 
WHY Solomon, the Temple, the Pillars B.. and J.. 
the Rites of the Mysteries (what little we know of 
them), the use of the Sacred Volume, the Three 
Pillars Wisdom, Strength and Beauty, the Apron of 
the Mysteries (Jason’s Golden Fleece), etc. etc., were 
ever chosen by the alleged “Gentlemen” or “operatives” 
to play such an important part in the modern Cere- 
monial No one has ever Suggested wuy it was done 
or How it happened. 


63 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


No writer has Produced the slightest evidence 
regarding the rpENTITY of the MAN Or MEN who 
created the Third Degree. Refuge has been con- 
sistently taken in vague statements like Bro, Pike: 


“To these men must be ascribed . . .” etc, 


without a shred of textual, historical or antiquarian 


evidence. We have the equally airy opinion of Bro. 
Blackham: 


“The whole of the Ritual of the Craft . . 
developed during the eighteenth century.” 


Bro. Hobbs is equally emphatic and equally vague: 


“During this period—171:7 to 1735—the 
Hiramic Legend was EVOLVED . . . 1746 being 
the probable date when the Royal Arch Ceremony 
Was arranged," 


Needless to say we are not told WHO “arranged” it, 


nor is there any evidence forthcoming to pin down the. 
“Arrangement” to this particular year. Because we 


only hear of the Royal Arch Chapter about this period 
it by no means follows that the Chapter had not been 
long practised in Secret prior to this date. Its 


our Ancient Brethren guarded their secrets from the 
“attacks of the insidious.” It is absurd really to talk 


-of the Royal Arch being “arranged” in 1746 when 


there “are clear hints of the Royal Arch as early as 
1723, the first express reference occurring in 1744," 
(Story of Craft, p. 78, L. Vibert.) 

We have, virtually, little or no knowledge of the 
“historic (1)” Hiram Abif who suffered martyrdom by 


. being slain by “THREE MEN of SIN" at the entrance to 


the Temple of Solomon. "There was a Hiram in the 
Scriptures who was a Widow's Son of the tribe of 
Naphtali and that is about all we know. He is 
unknown to Jewish literature and the story of his 


64 








Holy Land, but there is no proof that it was ever in 
existence save as a Masonic Fable. Dr. Oliver Says: 


“The Third Degree is traditional, historical, 
legendary . ... its tradition being hyperbolical, 
its history apocryphal, its legends fabulous,” 


In other words someone Specially created a Hiramic 
yth—marked with all the detail creative touches of 
genius—and wove this Myth into the Art of Temple 
Building, no longer an operative art but a Spiritual 
Cult based on the sentence: “Kuow Je not that ye are 
the TEMPLES of the Living God.” 

Who are the men that create Myths? Who produce 
our Songs? Who wrote the Sagas? Who IRIS 
“FEIGNED STORIES"? The Song of Baldur and Beowulf? 
The Arthurian Legend? The Regius Poem? 

Onlyonetypeofmind . , . the man of imagination. 
In the old days they were called Minstrels and ports! 

Someone with the mind of a Poet—one who was 
saturated with the Myths of the Ancient World— 
conceived the idea of Creating a modern Rite based on 
the ancient one, Since he could not introduce a 
Pagan Christos, he introduced the Holy Temple of 
the Jew, three Grand Masters, one being the wisest 


` man on earth . . . “Profound Solomon,” a legendary 


Hiram Abif and a "Tragedy." That ig why the 


“There are ceremonies even more remarkable 
in character connected with the Royal Arch and 
certain additional Degrees with other religious 
observances of antiquity.” (L. Vibert, p. 74, ibid.) 

E 65 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


One could therefore almost imagine William 
Shakespeare writing such words as these: 


“For if I should profess that I, going the same 
road as THE ANCIENTS, have Something better 
40 produce, there must needs have been some 
COMPARISON Or RIVALRY between us... in 
respect of excellency or ability of wit,” 


This actually was written by an Elizabethan; and 
it is a matter for conjecture whether such a sentence 
as this does not refer to a return along the roap to 
ANTIQUITY, the Ancient Mysteries which are to be 
the Model or Type of the New Ethical System of 
Elizabethan Freemasonry . . . a system which will 
be better than the old one because it will be linked 
to the Christian idea of Love or CHARITY. 

In any case the Masonic system was created by a 
man who was an Egyptian in soul, a Greek in heart, 
a Christ-Man by conviction and an Elizabethan in 
expression. He was one who knew exactly what 
Porsy stood for according to the Elizabethan standard, 

This is what Shakespeare says regarding the 
creating of a posti fiction around a piece of living 
history. In ds You Like It, Act HI, s. s: 


Audrey says: "I do not'know what POETICAL 
is... . I5 dta True Thing?" 
Touchstone: “Nol . . , The TRUEST POETRY 
_ 15 the most FEIGNED. What they may swear in 
Porrry may be said . . . They do FEIGN.” 


Shakespeare therefore knew that the Poets were the 
Inventors of Historical Tales that were “feigned.” The 
writers pretended they were historical (like Shake- 
speate’s Histories), but they were not so Jiterally, 
romance and imagination being mixed liberally with 
the real facts, He knew this as a truth because he was 
guilty of this sin . . . if “sin’ it be. 

66 





THE HIRAM LEGEND 


It must have been a characteristic of the Elizabethan 


Age because a Contemporary, Francis Bacon, wrote 
similarly. 


“By Pozsv I mean nothing else than FEIGNED 
HISTORY.” 


Shakespeare’s estimate of true poetry was that in 
order for it to be lovely, 


“There must be matter as well as Art, the 
Spontaneous overflow of a full mind stirred to 
the brim with true history, a knowledge of nature 
and especially human nature.” (Secret Society, 


Mrs. Pott.) 


Let it once be conceded that Shakespeare beside 
being a supreme Artist was also, deliberately, an 
Ethical "Teacher, possessed with a great umGE— "a 
Philanthropia”—for the Good of Mankind and the 
door is at once open for his active connection with the 
Elizabethan Fraternity, As a creative artist, of 
profound knowledge, saturated as every student knows 
with the wisdom of the East, the theogonies of 
vanished civilizations, he could have ‘created the 


’ Third Degree Death Rite and the Hiram Myth without 


the slightest difficulty. The Creator of Prospero, 
Hamlet and Lear could certainly have called Hiram 


‘into being and woven around him the tragical setting, 


I know of no one else in the whole range of literature 
who could have done so. 

In any case Shakespeare knew the Hiram story— 
whether he coined it or not—for he leaves it in scattered 
fragments in various parts of the plays. I place the 
complete story before the reader as it is told by the 
Immortal Bard in dramatic form as a narrative, 


67 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE STORY OF 
HIRAM’S DEATH: THE MYTH 


TOLD sy SHAKESPEARE 


THE MURDER 


l Alack, Alack! What Blood is this which stains 


The Stony Entrance of this Sepulchre? 

What mean these Masterless and gory swords 

To lie discoloured by this Place of Death? 
hear some noise! 


All run with open outcry toward our Monument. 
Search 


Seek and know how this foul Murder comes. 
Romeo and Fuliet, last scene. 


THE LOSS OF THE PLANS : CONFUSION 
O Horror, Horror, Horror! 


‘Tongue nor heart cannot conceive nor name theel 
What's the matter? 

Confusion now hath made his Masterpiece! 

Most Sacrilegious murder hath broke ope 

The Lord's Anointed TemPLE and Stolen thence 

The ure of the BUILDING! 
What is it you say? The LIFE? 

His silver skin, laced with his golden Blood, 

And his gashed stabs, looked like a breach in Nature 

For Ruin's wasteful Entrance. 


Macbeth, Act II, s. 3. 


THE SEARCH 
Look to it! 
Find thy BROTHER whereso’er he is. 
Seek him with canpiz: Bring him Dead or Living 
Within this twelve months. 
As You Like It, Act Tl, s. 1. 
68 





THE HIRAM LEGEND 


Bring his pRoTHzR to me . . . FIND him .. 


Do this suddenly. And let not search and inquisition 
fail 


To bring again these . . . runaways. 
ds You Like It, Act II, s. 2. 
Let'saway ... 
And get our Jewels . . 
Devise the fittest time and safest way 
To hide us from pursuit that will be made. 

ds You Like It, Act I, s. 3. 


THE HIDING-PLACE 


This is the uorg where Aaron bid us Hide him. 


Titus Andronicus, Act IL, 


THE DISCOVERY 

What! Art thou fallen? 

What subtle Hore is this whose Mouth is covered with 
rude, growing briers? Upon whose leaves are 
drops of new shed blood. . . . A very fatal place 
it seems to me . . . 

Speak srotuer! Hast thou hurt thee with the fall? 

O BROTHER with the dismallest object 

That ever eye with sight made heart lament. 
Why dost not comfort me and help me out 
From this unhallowed and blood-stained Hole? 

Look down into this den and see a fearful sight 

Of Blood and Death. . . . Lord B. -» lies embrewed 
here 

All on a heap like to.a slaughtered Lame 

In this detested, dark, blood-drinking prr. 


If it be dark, how dost thou know ’tis he? 


Upon his Bloody Finger he doth wear 
A precious Ring that lightens all the Hole, 
Which like a Taper in some Monument 


69 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Doth shine upon the dead man’s earthly cheeks 
And shows the ragged entrails of the Pit. 

O Brother, help me with thy fainting HAND, 

If fear hath made thee faint, as me it hath. . . . 


"A SLIP 


Reach me thy Hand that I may help thee out . . . 
Poor B....’s GRAVE... ; ; 
I have no strength to pluck thee to the Brink. . . . 


A SECOND SLIP 


‘Thy HAND ONCE MORE. .. . 1 will not loose 


again : 
Till thou art here aloft or I below. 


HE DESCENDS INTO THE GRAVE 


Thou canst not come to me, I come to thee . . 
Pll see what Hole is here. . . 


And wuo is ux that Now is LEAPT into itl 
Say, wHo ART THOU that lately did descend? 
Into this gaping Hollow of the earth? 


WHERE THE DRAMA IS REALLY BEING 
| HELD 


* * * Bothareat THE Lope... . . 


THE RETURN TO THE GRAVE 
Here we have found him pzap . . 
Poor B... here lies murdered. . . : 
‘Was ever heard the like? 


This is the Prr and this the ELDER TREE. 


Note.—The Acacia Tree is supposed to be the Oldest 
of all the trees, The wood it provided is Shittim 


1 The Man who Descended into the Grave was, of course, the 
“W.M.” of the ronce. 


70 











THE HIRAM LEGEND 


- which was specially used as the hardest and oldest in 
the building of Solomon’s Temple. The Acacia Tree, 
with its Masonic associations, is thus indicated as 
the Eldest Tree or the Elder Tree of all. - 


THE MURDERERS 


Look, Sirs, if you can find the Huntsmen out 
That should have murdered B... here. 


THREE PERSONS INVOLVED: TWO 
WHELPS AND THE PERSON ADDRESSED 
Two of thy whelps, F.(ell) C.(urs) of bloody kind 

ave here bereft my BROTHER of his life. 

Sirs, drag them from the Pit unto the prison 
There let them bide till we have devised 
Some never heard-of torturing pains for them. 

Note that the Initial Letters “F.C.” in “Fell Curs 
of Bloody Kind,” stand in the Masonic Ritual Letter 


Code for “reLLow CRAFTS,” the very class that 
murdered Hiram. : 


THEIR HEINOUS CRIME 
Some bring the murdered body, some the murtherers, 
Let them not Speak a word, their guilt is plain, 


For by my soul, were there worse end than death, 
That end upon them should be executed. 


The above extracts from Titus Andronicus, Act Il. 


THE CRIMINALS LAMENT 
Our purposes God justly hath discovered, 
And I repent my fault more than my death, 
Which I beseech your Highness to forgive 
Although my body pay the price of it. 
Henry IF, Act I, s. 3 
7 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


' THE SEPULTURE 
We have done our obsequies! 
Come, lay him down. 
Here's a few flowers, but about MIDNIGHT mote. 
"The Herbs that have on them the cold dew of the night 
Áre strewings fit for graves... . 
‘These Herblets shall. . - We strew. 


Cymbeline, Act IV, s. 2. 
This Tablet lay upon his breast wherein i 


` Our pleasure, his full Fortune doth confine. 


Cymbeline, Act V, s. 2. 


For some of these scattered quotations, I am indebted 
to Dr. Orville Owen who in 1 894 wrote: 2 


"I have found unmistakable evidence that the 
: Author of the. Plays was not only a Mason of 
High standing but that he placed in the Plays 
a large portion of the Masonic Ritual. 
“He claims to have been a Grand Master 
+ +. and a Rosicrucian Knight.” 


This opinion is valuable because during my own 
researches I was unaware of Dr. Owen’s opinion. It 
coincides with my own exactly; neither was I then 
aware that he had discovered Masonic fragments 
embedded in the plays. 

Having traced Freemasonry into the Elizabethan 
era, we find the greatest intellect of the age associated 
openly with the Fraternity by being termed a “Worthy 
Fellow” in one of the greatest and most enigmatical 
books ever written or printed. Throughout the plays 
he speaks of Noble Orders and Fraternities. He is 
familiar with a “Worshipful Society” and a "Worship- 
ful Master." He unquestionably camouflages the 
Story of Hiram in a poetic paraphrase from the Ritual, 


72 








THE HIRAM LEGEND 


near enough for one to be certain that this Ritual 
Legend was in his mind when he was writing his 
dramas, and that he disguised it as we know he did 
in Hamlet and other historical happenings. We 
have the murder in the Temple, the hiding of the 
body, the "sirps" preparatory to raising Hiram, the 
descent into the Grave by the W:M. The Acacia is 
mentioned, the pursuit, the Sepulture befitting his 
rank, the punishment and remorse of the criminals, 


Only one who was Steeped in the customs and 


FEY written yet veiled from the eyes of 
the world, to be seen only through the eyes of a 
discerning Brother, 

In view of the fact that Masons swear never to 
reveal, write, indite, etc. any of their Secrets, we are 
Justified in asking: Did Shakespeare found the 
Fraternity of Freemasons? Did he write the Rituals 
and bury the Manuscripts with the “Grand Possessors” 
as he buried the Manuscripts of the plays? Was he 
the Father of the. Craft and therefore above the vow? 


73 








V 
LOVE'S LABOURS LOST 


THE COMEDY IN WHICH IS HIDDEN 
THE GENESIS OF THE CRAFT 


"Keeping what is swonN . . . for Wisdom's sake . .. 
for Love's sake . . . for Women's sake . . . IT IS RELIGION. 
. . + For cuanrry itself fulfils the raw, and who can sEvER 
LOVE FROM CHARITY!” 


LOVE'S LABOURS LOST, ACT IV, $. 3, L. 355. 


= HE greatest part of the Hiram Story is told 
in Titus Andronicus, This was first printed in 
1600, There is an acute division of opinion 
whether Shakespeare be the Author or not. Many 
scholars believe that some other unknown dramatist 
must have collaborated with him. Knight believes— 
with others—that the entire work was Shakespeare’s, of 
inferior performance, the mark of “a very young poct.’ 
He adduces evidence that it was written “in the year 
1589, at which time he was but twenty-five.” 

The fact that contemporaries like Ben Jonson and 
Meres ascribe the play definitely to Shakespeare has, 
however, far more evidential value than the academic 
speculations of critics three hundred years afterwards, 

The chief difficulty in accepting Shakespeare’s 
authorship for the play, according to modern com- 
mentators, is that the “Sweet Swan of Avon” had only 
left Stratford in 1587, "all but destitute of polished 
accomplishments," declares his scholarly biographer, 
Halliwell Phillips—and had learned in such a short 
space of time as two years, the Art of the Dramatist. 


74 





TUA i n e A OAS MEAE Rat 


“LOVE'S LABOURS .LOST" 


Such carping objectors should realize that to great 
genius all things are possible, vide Sir Sidney Lee’s 
` biography of William Shakespeare. 


“He rode roughshod over the unities of time, 
place and action. There were critics in his day 
who zealously championed the ancient rules and 
viewed with distrust any infringement of them. 
But the force of Shakespeare’s centus—ITS 
REVELATION OF NEW METHODS—was 
welcomed by Playgoers," etc. (p- 326). 


Shakespeare's dexterity in the use of the Masonic 
Ritual Code, etc. is indeed “A Revelation of New 
Methods” hitherto unsuspected of his dramatic Art. 
Whether he collaborated with anyone in the writing of 
Titus Andronicus is hardly worth the trouble of determin- 
ing from a Masonic view-point, for any such objections 
cannot apply to Love's Labours Lost. This verifiably 
was produced by William Shakespeare. It was printed 
in 1598 and was the first play to bear the name of 
“Shakespere” which afterwards became “Shakes eare.” 

The play Quarto states that it was acted before the 
Queen on the previous Christmas. The plays (after- 
wards known to be Shakespeare’s) that had already 
been published bore no Author’s name, There were 
in all eight anonymous plays. Authorities like Furnivall, 
Knight, Fleay, Lee are agreed that though this play 
was printed in 1598, it was written in or about 1 589 and 
was one of his earliest "attempts" at play-writing. 


"No older Play on the Subject has yet been 
discovered nor any Story upon which it could 
have been founded. . . . 

"It may be difficult to point out Shakespeare’s 
best Play but there is little difficulty in pointing 
out his worst .... as a Drama, a study of 
character, or a poetical work.” (F. A. Marshall, 
Irving Ed. Shakespeare, Vol. 1, a) 


75 .- 


pe ro ee) oe 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


The play is cast in the form of a comedy. A King 
and three courtiers resolve to make their Court into a 


‘little Academie devoted to the pursuit of secret 


knowledge to which ladies may not be admitted. The 
ladies of course arrive. It requires little discernment 
to see that under such a comedy-cover, situations could 
arise in which Masonic words, phrases and incidents 
could easily be manipulated that would carry quite 
a different interpretation (Masonically) from the open 
one apparent to the ordinary reader. With the Lodge 
Ritual as a skeleton—its perambulations, gestures, 
signs, idealism, etc.—a. padding of comedy could 
easily be superimposed through which the Masonic 
Bones could never be seen save by the “Initiated” 
+ +. not even then unless he knew where to look and 
how to look. 


It is self-evident that if the Founder of the Craft. 


wished permanently to identify himself with the 
Fraternity, yet to remain hidden from the world, he 
could not have chosen a simpler or a more excellent 
way of carrying out his pxsiGN as a Master Architect. 

‘The SUBJECT . . . nor any STORY upon which 
the Play could have been founded” has never been 
discovered because it was a SECRET story and a 
HIDDEN .SUBJECT known only to Masons. It is 
“Shakespeare’s worst Play” from every point of view 
say the "uninstructed" scholars of the world because 
all the vital asides are “Lost,” being secret Masonic 
hints and jests. . 

The objections to the play are Strong presumptive 
proofs that it is far more than it seems to be on the 
surface. - The title itself is significant Masonically— 
"Love's Labour is Lost,” for Freemasonry is founded 
on Charity whose broad sweep takes in “Love” of all 
kinds. The labours of such Love—assuming that 
some refer to the writing of the Rituals and the 
founding of an organized Fraternity—are indeed 


' “Lost”; they are in the world unknown. 


76 








T thememory of my beloued,: . 
The AVTHOR TY 


Ms, Woirtiam Suaxesrsare: ow 
ND 
whathe hath left vs, x; 


0 dears ns enay (Shakelpcarcyen thy neme, 
ders thas nglerathy bebe and oet 
Mule enfeffe thy acrings tobe ach, 
2 As nestke Man, mr Mule, can frafe tso math 
“Te tracyandal mens fafiege. Bal tee rages 
ere met the pala Pnient vriothy pra 
Fer facet Ignorance enthefe nayight, 
Why alent fonds at bef dud cc's righ 
Or Hinde Affetiven, which detline've adgence 
Thetrat but gripes, end-urgeball by cheney 
Or ersfty Melceymightpetendvhn prife, 
And thinketoraine, where 1 feemtd tery, 
Thé ere, feme infu Boyd, er hare, 
Shesld pray adatron, What could bert her ere 
Bet thew art proefeapeinft ern, and indeed 
lene Bil fertone f hers ee the meed. 
Mtberrevillegon, Seal the Age? 
The apples Velght the wonder of er stage 
M By Shaklee rs tla i he 
ze Chancer or Spent, bra Beaumont he 
Alt farther, tamekethee aroomes 
Thewart a Moniment, uthvut a tembe, 
And ars atiwe filt, menté thy borke dth tine, 
Ardwy base wits terced, and pref tagrat. 
Thus 1 put mixe skee famy braint exenfes 
Lu JL mane übgreat, ba diforeper ron a Mufeg ; 
Fer if I thenght my indgement were oj "yeeres, 
Jinldeimomit the fere withthy peere 
Z Am 4ell, bem farre thew deal enr Lily one. foine, 
” Or fperting Kid, er Marlowes mighty ine, 
A0 Mrüioghthm hadfi finali Latine, ant bf Grecka, 
Fram thencetebenvar thee, Tli rt fece 
s Posmay bat elif thantrong hs, 
P Euripides asd Sophocles tes, » 
22 Pacewuiws, Accius, hinrafCordora dee 
Te ifesgeine,tohcere thy Buskin treed, 
cde srqestr mini eds eee, 
Vd. ine thee, 5] 
wes efi tearje. 


= A oe 


ze 


& 
x 
| 


al 


NEN SROLN TASTE SOU SEAT EQ DEAR AS Sat 


From Secret Shakéspearian Seals. 


Tn this Poem to Shakespeare which proves that B 
h n 
Fraternity, the count is again 287. P eE Tena Wae OE t Seitek 
We also see the Masonic Set-Squares which at once i i 
tell the connection with t 
Craft and that the Author Was associated with Masonry. That Shakespeare was ds 
Founder is quite subtly indicated by the enigmatical sentence : "AND What He 


hath Left us;” the Masoni S. indi m 
that ruled by ike Sauer ystem, of course, indicated by the “Sign of the Master 


Prare V 
(See page 193) 








‘THLE FIRST PAGE OF THE COMEDIES: 
“THE TEMPEST” 





TEMPEST.. 









A 
d'a f eA primus, Sctna prima. BÉ 
"— Ea mm"—E 
rte onu Vien doyeubenSmhwr | 
e aig mdiretrda ejes ; À 
z 
$ ” 
~ Ref Wear Va 2 
LU Ate. Croed : Speskeca * 
4 ly or enm ou lees gt - 
emn 
a 


tee Gee Boratto nee care there’ the Mie 
Ner Plar yhe rene 

Barf.) prapoow keepe below, 

Ameh Where nihe. fon? 
mint ew bbenr, 
be forme, 





e meniiyehened ol oorkorvhy dvekade, 

hepteafelimacldthounsnghll tye drome. 

sing she wathng een Teds 

e Herlbehang . 

Tosgh erg disp efi fece gredi 

a. a, | Nite together demens 

Mrs Cod gt temembermhm ion oft boord, | Macon 

res moasg ale, Yoome | we iia wein, Formlig mite d chiitn, 

aCeuilllonstyoucsncemaacd thet Elementtiofe | Syrenelibraskes we phaser (taywelpin, 

[o tod woke the pene of he rele mte milit b Ipv obest Ret ds 
rer mort, v pow snbonme: Wpoecoma, | $e Lervokeloseof om. 2 

Vire Euer. Meg | Seca oat ioten 

Met Sent Ec Ee icis im 

rg Eats | fre dyes dey denhe Ent. 
je Mesue gest comfort (rom ibo fellowemeshinkt 

schuiinadstarng mate spook, seomplesen Sea Sici 


ped Fane roth 
Ern Tiger end Mortals, 
Mes V by yos Age (ony Aerie father) you bree 





TA ANA ENS 








as 





s: 








ie, 
fens iens 

BufDowne ishincop-Halsyucjonertoner, | Borsbo ih Senne 

bring herso Fry mith Maine-couste, A plague esihe fueran, ONT haehaa 

Pedro Tear salon deest ea | Whihoe tach fed 








RAL ASN ARN GRE 
Je siis hsgasA i S s 


js v 





s 


Reproduced from Cypher Signatures, by Frank Woodward. 


i i i ‘The second 
d column is found again the 287 by a straight count. i 
NE dun B the first column. There are 257 Roman Words and 100 Italic 
Letters, which by subtraction total the 157- 


Prave VI 





rangement“ 


T 


“LOVE'S -LABOURS LOST” 


The Author lets it be known that he used the 
comedy as a vxiL for a secret, serious purpose by 
writing: 

“That Sport best pleases . . . where Zeal 
+. dies in that which it presents: Their Form 
CONFOUNDED makes MIRTH... . Great 
Things Labouring perish in their Birth” (Act V, 
s. 2, 1. 517). - 


Shakespeare thus directly tells the student that he 
has confounded the Form of something to make 
Mirth; the genesis of the newly born Order dies in 
its birth by being overlaid with humour—Great 
‘Things are being hidden in the manner of presentation. 
That the Author was thoroughly acquainted with the 
art of writing with an inner meaning as well as an 
outer is proved by the sentence: 


“You have a DOUBLE Tongue within your 
Mask" (Act V, s. 2, ]. 245). 


He finally slips the key into the discerning reader's 
hand by telling him how to proceed in order to 
discover his real meaning. He writes: 


"I that am nonssr BREAK THE VOW... 
When you see me write a thing . . . 
Spend a minute’s time IN PRUNING ME...” 


(Act IV, s, 3, 1. 181). 


We have now complete justification for carefully going 
through this play (or any other Masonic play) aud cutting 
out the superfluous padding of comedy, We simply take 
down the scaffolding of verbiage which veils a living 
Temple of Ethical Art . . . in order to understand 
the Author's hidden Theme—‘Since Love’s ARGUMENT 
was first set on Foor” (Act V, s. 2, 1. 757). 

When the buried fragments are set out and 
catalogued, even an “‘uninstructed” wayfarer can see 
at a glance that they deal with the Ideals, Manners, 


77 


= 























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Customs and Secrets of the Fraternity, and that they 
indicate unmistakably the origin and rise of the Free 
and accepted Brotherhood in England. It is the 
Author's rirsr great Masonic play, 


© Passages are given as they follow in order 
throughout each Act, 


“A PLEASANT CONCEITED COMEDIE 
CALLED 
LOVE'S LABOURS LOST." 
d The Quarto Title, 1 598. 


: Acr I 

THE URGE TO CREATE AN ETHICAL 

7 SYSTEM 

Let Fame that all hunt after in their Lives, 

live registered upon our brazen Tombs, and then 
Grace us in the Disgrace of Death... . The 
endeavour of this present Breath may buy that 
Honour which shall bate she Sothe's keen Edge, 
and MAKE us Heirs of all Eternity. 

Note.—As the Theme develops, it will be found 
that to be “Graced in Death” is a subtle reference to 
the Third Degree in which a Fellowcraft is “graced.” 
To “axe Heirs” can also be understood to mean the 
"MAKING" of Masons in future Ages, the Heirs of the 
Elizabethans. To “make” is a technical Masonic 
term. 


THE AIMS OF FREEMASONRY 


(To) war against your own affection (passions) 
and the huge Army of the World’s Desires, 


: THE CONCEPTION OF THE LODGE 
Our Court shall be a Hitle Academie, still (quiet) 
and Contemplative in LIVING ART (ie. the 
Making of Living Temples from the Stone of 
` Humanity). 


78 














“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” 


THE THREE WHO RULE 


You rarm... my Fellow Scholars... . 
have sworn for THREE Years . . . to keep those 
Statutes that are recorded here, 

Note—A Year is à Degree of Time, 
probably intended as a Cover-Word for 


THE VOW 


Your Oaths are passed and now subscribe 
your Names, that his own hand may Strike his 
Honour down that VIOLATES the smallest branch 


“Year” is 
“Degree.” 


herein, 


L.: I am resolved. : * * The Mind shall 
Banquet though the body pine. . . 3 
D.: 'The grosser manners of the World's ' 


Delights I throw upon the gross World's 
Baser SLAVES. 


B.: Ihave already Sworn, . . . But there are 
other STRICT OBSERVANCES. ~ o What 
is the end of Study? 

Note.—S peculative Freemasonry can only be prac- 
tised, theoretically speaking, by FREE MEN in Mind 


who are not enslaved by dogmatic chains. A Freemason 
is the very antithesis of “a Base Slave," 


THE OBJECT 
To Know what else we should not know: 


ings HID and barr'd from Common Sense . , 
To SEEK the LIGHT of TRUTH. 


A FIRST VAGUE HINT 
Light seeking LIGHT doth Light of Light beguile , , 
Te YOU FIND where LIGHT in DARKNESS lies, 
Your Light Stows DARK by losing of your EYES. 
Note.—This cannot be understood except Masonic- 
ally. A Candidate is presumed to be sufficiently 
79 ; 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


illuminated interiorly to seek voluntarily for the ticuT 
of Masonry. The full ticur of a Master Mason 
is “DARKNESS VISIBLE” illumined by a glimmering 
Ray ... the “Light in Darkness.” That Light 
cannot be found by a Candidate. The Light of his 
EYES is darkened and Ae loses them before he SEES. 


THE ALL-SEEING EYE 


Study me (i.e. show me) how to please the 
(human) eye by fixing it upon a Fairer EYE 
which dazzling so shall be his heed and give him 
LicuT that it was blinded by. 

. Note.—The Masonic Initiate who seeks the Masonic 

Light can only do so by the Losing of his Eyes. 
Figuratively, he is BLINDED by the Light. The “Eye” 
is, of course, the Masonic rvs, the All-Seeing Eye, 
the sun, 


“THAT GLORIOUS LUMINARY, 
THE SUN" 


Study is like Heaven’s cLorious sun that will 
not be deep-searched with Saucy Looks (i.e 
superficially). 


“HE CROWNETH HIS TEMPLE WITH 
STARS AS WITH A DIADEM" 


The Earthly God-Fathers of Heaven’s Lights 
that give a fixed name to every star have no 
more profit of their Shining Nights, than those 
that walk and wot not what they are. . . . 
Small (i.e. little good) have continual plodders 
ever won save base Authority from the books 
of others. 


Note.—This is a remarkably clear intimation that 
the Author does not consider a mere classification of 
“fixed names” sufficiently serviceable to humanity. It 
opens the door to a new interpretation of Sun, Moon 

80 





“LOVE'S LABOURS LOST" 


and Stars by regarding them as Symbols with an 
Ethical Significance as in Freemasonry. 


THE BIRTH OF FREEMASONRY 
Why should I Joy in any Abortive srrru? 
To study (such matters) now is Too LATE (in 
the history of the world). 
You cims over the nouse (of Wisdom) so 
unlock the little GATE. 

Note.—This positively indicates the conception of 
the Ethical System of Symbolism. The above objection 
to the inauguration of Freemasonry (placed in the 
mouth of a Character) is the natural one that such a 
Cult (based on ancient Pagan Pantheism) comes into 
being too late in the day, born out of due time, and 
should have been born into the world centuries ago. 

The Masonic concept is indicated with wonderful 
dexterity. “The House” referred to came to be known 
later as "soLoMoN's Housz," as the "House of 
Wisdom," as "Solomon's Temple," which could only 


. be approached by a Loper Entrance, the Door having 


a “little Gate” as a peephole to ascertain the person 
seeking admission. 

The word “crims” indicates the sine gua non of the 
Craft and its operative connection. 

The clear terms of the passage in full simply 
expressed the conception, creation and birth of Free- 
masonry in the Elizabethan age, which had not gone 
through Degrees of Development—from the Mysteries 
—through a connective line of either Medieval, opera- 
tive or Secret Societies such as the Rosicrucians or the 
Knights Templar, but was a reconstruction of the Old 
Rites and Customs . . . the Mysteries, the Templars, 


the German Steinmetzen, etc. 


“VOWS ARE REQUIRED” 
(Yet) . . . I kave SIFORN . . . for that 
ANGEL-KNOWLEDGE . . . so give me the Paper. 


F 81 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


“Let me read the same, and to the Strictest 
Decrees I will write my name. 


A MASCULINE FRATERNITY 


No Woman shall ever come within a mile of 
my Court. 


THE PENALTY 


Let me see the pewatty: (Reads) “On Pain of 
Losine her roncuz.” Who devised the prnaury? 
THAT DID I. 


“OR THE MORE EFFECTIVE 
PUNISHMENT" 


(Reads) “Ifany man . . . TALK . . . heshall 
endure such Public Shame as the rest of the 
Court can possibly devise." 


` A SERIOUS OBLIGATION 

If I break Faith this worp shall speak for 
me. ... He that Breaks them in the least 
DEGREE stands in Attainder of Eternal SHAME. 


THE WRITER OF THE RITUAL 


Our Court is, haunted with @ refined Traveller 
from Spain; a man in all the World’s new 
Fashion planted that hath MINT of PHRASES 

-in his Brain; one whom the Music of his own 

Tongue doth ravish like enchanting HARMONY: 

a Man of Complements (ornamental accomplish- 

- ments) whom RIGHT AND WRONG have 
` chosen as UMPIRE of their Mutiny. 

This Child of Fancy . . . to our Studies shall 
relate in High-Born wonps she WORTH of many 
4 KNIGHT . . . Lost in the World's Debates. 


Note.—Here we have the TRAVELLER from _the 
Continent who is presumed by many Masonic writers 


82 





“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” - 


to have introduced the concepts of Freemasonry into 
England. Shakespeare knew him. He had a “Mint 
of Phrases” and knew the peculiar Masonic word, 
“Harmony.” 

The significance of this passage is self-evident. 

The Masonic Concept revolves around a question 
of “Right and Wrong.” It is ETHICAL, 

It deals, too, with the “worta” of many a Lost 
Knight: not a Military Knight, but a Knight of 
Speech attached to: Ancient, Noble onpzns lost and 
forgotten. . i 

The relation in high-born words is, therefore, to be 
of a composite character . . . a Blend of Ideals of 
WORTH taken from all over the world, for the WRITER 
is to be the “umprre” of the reconstructed Concept 
of Right and Wrong in the new Spiritual Temple of 


_ Freemasonry. 


DEMEANOUR IN THE LODGE 


To hear Meekly and to laugh Moderately or 
to forbear both. 


THE LADDER 


The STILE shall give us cause to CLIMB in 
the Merriness. 

Note.—The Quarto and the Folio print "Stile" not 
"Style" as altered without warrant by modern editors. 
A Stile is a short Ladder. In Masonry it has Three 
Principal Steps. It is a clean-cut reference to the 


short Masonic Ladder which Masons figuratively 
CLIMB. 


THE TIME OF MEETING 


The Time When? 
About the Sixth hour. . . . When Men sit 
down to that nourishment which is called Supper. 


83 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE PLACE 


(It is) Put together ix Manner and Form... . 
Then for the Place, Where . . .? It Standeth 
North-North East . . . by East from the West 
CORNER of thy Curious-knotted Garden. 


Note.—A. knotted Garden is a Symbol for inter- 
woven Flowers of Thought taken from Systems that 
range from East to West: it is an exact description 
of the intertwined Symbolism of Freemasonry. 


THE QUALIFICATION 


4 Man of Good Repuie, courage, bearing and 
estimation. 


OATHS AND LAWS 
I will lay my Head to any Good Man’s Hat 
these Oaths and Laws will prove an Idle 
Scorn. ... 
I suffer for THE TRUTH. 


Note.—Here we have the definite association of 
“oarus and Laws” with a Secret Masculine Fraternity 
whose Ethical Ideals centre in the “rrutu.” 

Shakespeare even associates them with "a Good 
Man's uar" because in all the Ancient Lodges the 
W.M. wore a Three-corner Cocked Hat in the Lodge 
as a Symbol of Authority, Freemasonry being "the 
Religion . . . of all Good Men and True” (1723 
Constitutions). 


THE THREE KNOCKS: ONE AND TWO 


How many is one thrice told? 

I am ill at reckoning. 

How much does the gross sum of deuce-ace 
amount to? 


84 





“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” 


It doth amount to ONE MORE THAN TWO. 
Which the base vulgar do call THREE. 


A most fine Figure. 
To prove you Cypher! 

Note.—The “One more than Two” knock is, of 
course, known to every Mason. 

The last line of the passage tells the reader quite 
distinctly that what he writes carries a Code ot a series 
of Codes to clarify his meaning. We are thus warned 
that we may expect a Code that will give proof of 
secret things not to be openly broadcast. 


Secret Codes, Cyphers, etc., were rampant in the 
Elizabethan Era. 


THE PORTER OR STEWARD AND OTHER 
SIGNIFICANT ALLUSIONS 
More Authority. . . . Name more. . . . Let 
them be men of Good Repute and carriage. 
Samson, Master! He was a man of good 
carriage for he carried the Town-gates 


"THE T.P." on his back like a Porter. 


O well knit Samson. . . . I do excel thee iz 
my rapier as much as thou didst me in carrying. 
. . » Who was Samson’s love? 


"A W.M." A Woman, Master. 


Of what complexion? 

Of the sea-water, Greene Sir. 

Mine is most immaculate white and red. 
Thoughts are masked under such colours. 


Note.—By virtue of the Authority of “the Rapier,” 
the Worshipful Master far excels the Porter or Steward 
who occupies the most subordinate Office. Though a 
“man of good repute” the first task of an Office 
Aspirant is “to fetch and carry,” The Rapier was the 


85 


I 
I 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


‘W.M.’s Symbol of Office in the Elizabethan days, the 
Hat and Rapier being conjoined Symbols. They are 
repeated in The Tempest by Master Prospero: “Fetch 
me my Hat and Rapier.” : 

With our ancient Brethren “Sams Son” was a 
corrupted cover-word for “Solomon’s Son.” The 
word-play of “Samson” for "Sam's Son" denoted a 
Freemason. The Author enjoins the reader to “Knit 


. Weil” the word “Samson.” One naturally associates 


him with the “T'wo Pillars” under which he bowed 
his back when he killed himself. 

There are also ‘“T'wo Pillars” in Masonry,designated 
in Code as “T.P.” Special Masonic Symbols and phrases 
are invariably indicated by their Initial Letters. In the 
Folio paragraph the only Roman capitals, apart from 
“Master,” are “T.P.” ; thus the “T.P.” are the Masonic 
equivalent for “The Two Pillars.’ The Author 
indicates by the “knitting” of the capitals that the 
“Sam’s Son” he alludes to was a Worshipful *' Master" 
who also, figuratively, carries the “Two Pillars” of 
Masonry. 

The love of Samson was a “woman” but the love 
ofa “Sam’s Son” is “A W.M.,” a Worshipful Master, 
the goal of every ambitious Mason. The Author 
prints the correct initials in capitals in the line 
succeeding . . . "A W.M." 

The colour of "Sea Water" is the light blue reflection 
of “the Vault of infinite space.” Itis the Garter-Blue 
of the Master Mason. Shakespeare associates it with 
“Red and White,” being obviously familiar with both 
“Red and Blue” Masonry. White is a predominate 
feature of the Craft. 

They are Masonic “thoughts that are masked under 
such colours.” 

Within twenty lines of the instruction “To prove 
you Cypher,” we have the Masonic Code of Cypher 
Initials, unmistakably indicated by “T.P.” and 
“A W.M.” 


86 


"LOVE'S LABOURS LOST" 







POOR AND PENNILESS YET HE SAT IN 
THE CHAIR OF KING SOLOMON 


Is there not a Ballad of a King and a Beggar...? 
Some Three Ages since. . . . Now 'tis not 
to be found. 
I wil have that susjecr newly writ o’er that 
I may example my Digression by some Mighty 
Precedent. 
Note.—We here get the germ of a Masonic 
Fundamental. Its complete Masonic elaboration will 
be seen later. 


THE LODGE 
I will meet thee at the Lodge... . 
That’s hereby. ` 
I know where it is situate. 
Lord, How wise you are. 


THE ETHICAL SYMBOLISM OF THE 
TEMPLE AND THE CONCEPTION OF THE 
THIRD DEGREE OF MASONRY 


I do affect the very Ground which is (the) 
Base . . . (the) Shoe which is baser . . . Guided 
by . . . (the) Foot which . . . doth tread. . . . 
A Great Argument... . 

There is no Angel but Lovr. . . . Solomon 
. . . hada very good Wit. . . . The rirst and 
SECOND will not serve my Turn. . . . His (ie. 
the King of Terrors) Glory is to subdue men... . 

Adieu Valour! Rust Rapier! Be still Drum! 
- . . Ássist me some extemporal God! Devise, 
Wit; write, pen; for I am in for WHOLE VOLUMES 
in roLro (i.e. a series of Degrees and Rituals after 
the ‘First and Second” Degrees). 


87 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Acr II 


"ALL KNOWLEDGE BE MY PROVINCE" 
(The Creator of F. -M.) 

Consider , . . his Embassy: To Parley with 
the Sole Inheritor of all Perfections that a man 
may owe (i.e. be indebted to. . . ) held precious 
in the World’s Esteem. 


THE SECRET COURT 
(He) hath made a vow till painful study shall 
outweat Three Years. No Woman may approach 
his silent Court. . . . Forbidden Gates. . , 


NO ADMITTANCE 

He rather means to topcr youin the FIELD... 
than seek 4 DISPENSATION for his Oath to 

let you Enter. . . . Here (he) comes. 
Note.—The operatives in the ‘Middle Ages held 
their trade lodge in the field outside the Edifice that 

was being built. 

‘The very word “Dispensation” is to-day in constant 
evidence between local Lodges and the Grand Lodge 

with exactly the same implied interpretation, 


THE BRETHREN 
Who are the votaries that are VOW-FELLOWS 
with this Virtuous Duke? 
Oneis . . . a Man of SOVEREIGN PARTS 
in ARTS well fitted, 
Note the covert allusion to the Higher Degrees: 
the “Sovereigns” of the Order . . + Sovereigns of 


the Royal Art, 


“AS HIGH AS THE HEAVENS" (Ritual) 
' Fair Princes . . . she Roof of this Court is too 
High to be yours, . . , 
CONDUCT me. . ., 
88 





"LOVE'S LABOURS LOST" 


, Thave sworn an Oath... . You may not come 
in my Gates but you shall be so received without 


as you shall deem yourself Lodged IN MY 
HEART. 


THE CANDIDATE’S ENTRANCE 

Is (he) sick? 

Sick at the Heart. . 

Will you prick it with your yg? 

O POYNT, with my Knife, 

Note how “Point” ig spelt in the Folio |.. 
“Poynt” to call attention to the word “poyn” which 
is given to draw the Masonic reader’s attention to the 
“poiniard” which is used as à KNIFE for pricking the 


eart, 
THE PASS-WORD 
I beseech you a worn. . 


A CANDIDATE'S CHARACTERISTICS 


His Tongue all impatient to Speak and nor 
SEE. (He) did stumble with haste . . . his face .., 
did quote such amazes: THAT, all eyes saw. His 
eyes were enchanted with gazes, 


PRIVATE TUITION 


. Come to our Pavilion . * * to speak THAT 
in WORDS which hath (been) piscioszp, 


Acr III 


THE PERAMBULATION : FIRST DEGREE 
The Way is but Short; Away... , THUMP, 


Note.—This is an exact description of the h... 


Wit Cn... being taken to the J.W. and the 
“Thump” on the sh 


tet, 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 
AN ASIDE TO THE CANDIDATE 


This is an Epilogue or Discourse to make plain 
some obscure precedence that hath before been 
said, 


THE ROSICROSSE PASS-WORD, “OUR 
FRANCIS” 

We will talk no more of this matter, 

Till there be more matter . oe? 

I will enfranchise thee! 

. ©, marry me to one Francis. 
Note.—The spelling in the Quarto and the Folio is 

“Francis,” a Man's name, not “Frances,” a woman's 
name, the corrupted spelling in Modern Editions. 


THE W.M. TO THE CANDIDATE: 
MASONRY IS FREE 


I mean setting thee at Liberty; Enfreedoming 

' thy person. Thou wert restrained, immured, 
captivated, BoUND... . . 

I give thee thy xinznTY, set thee from durance 

* : * I impose on thee nothing but this; BEAR 

this Significant (giving him a LETTER) to... 


The Best Ward of mine Honour is rewarding 

. my Dependents. 

Note.—Every Freemason knows that at this part 
of the Ceremonial, the Candidate is "rewarded" by 
the: W.M., and that he actually does take a letter to 
the J.W., and that, later, the “Best WARD(en)" does 
indeed reward the W.M.’s dependent by investing 
him. | : : 


. THE WORK OF THE SENIOR AND JUNIOR 
DEACONS ; 

I have been Love's Whip; a very Beadle. . , 

a Critic, nay, a NIGHT-WATCH CONS TABLE, 


go 





“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” 


a domineering Pedant over the Boy (ie. a 
Candidate)—this WHIMPLED, Purblind, Way- 
ward (one)}—a Senior, Junior G... D. D...C. 
Note.—'""Whimpled" means Veiled or hooded. 
‘The “Hoodwinks” were therefore used in those days. 
The Deacon's duty is to watch the Candidate like a 
Constable, the ceremony is usually at “Night,” he 
has to instruct the Candidate how to repeat, etc. with 
extreme precision like a “Pedant” who is a stickler for 
precise order, and the Candidate is indeed, usually, 
very “Wayward.” > 
The story of an Initiation could not have been more 


tersely put. 
THE BLACK-BALLS 

O Lord of Folded Arms, the Anointed 
` SOVEREIGN.. . . Sole IMPERATOR and Great 
General (note the “G.G.” =the Grand Geometri- 
cian) of trotting PARITORS, Y am to be a 
Corporal of his Field and wear his Colours that 

are like to a Tumbler’s Hoop. . . . 
With Two Pitch-Balls, one will do the DEED 

though Argus were the Guard. . a 

Note.—AÀ. Paritor is an officer of an Ecclesiastical 
Court, the equivalent of a Lodge Deacon who does 
quite a lot of “trotting about” on the ‘Lodge floor 
like a Corporal. He deals with “Pitch-Balls,” 

Shakespeare's use of the word "Angus" proves that 
he knew how the Ballot for a proposed Candidate was 
taken. In Greek Mythology, Argus was supposed 
to have a hundred eyes. It is used to describe “any 
quick-eyed or watchful person." The Masonic Ballot 
is taken in such a way that no one can tell how the 
Brethren vote. 

The Colours of a Tumbler’s Hoop were twisted 
Red and Blue; So, too, are the diagonal colours of the 
SASH of the ROYAL ARCH COMPANION which is a flexible 
Hoop put over the. head, like the Tumbler does with 
his Hoop in some of the tricks, 


91 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Act IV 


THE ACACIA 


Where is the Bush that we must stand and 
Play the Murderer in? . . . ; 


THE THIRD DEGREE SYMBOLS 


Thou shouldst know, FELLOW, by the rest 
that have xo HEADS (i.e. the cross-bones). . . . 


THE BRETHREN 


Here comes a Member of the Commonwealth. 


A WORSHIPFUL MASTER'S COMMENT 
ON THE THREE DEGREES 


The most Illustrate King set eye upon the 
Beggar. He it was that might rightly say, “Veni, 
vidi, vici. . . .” Base and onscunz Vulgarl 
(for) he Came, Saw and Over-Came. 

He came, One; saw, two; oyer-came, THREE! 

Who came? The King] To whom came he? 
The seccar! The conclusion is VICTORY. . .. 

I am the King for so standeth the comparison. 
Thou the Beggar for so -witnesseth shy Jowliness. 
Shall I command thy Love? ... What shalt 
thou exchange for Rags? roszs! For Tittles? 
tities! For thyself? mz... . Jn she dearest 
DESIGN OF INDUSTRY! 


Note.—In this significant piece of camouflage. is 
the “Newly written” Story of the King and the 
Beggar which the Author previously mentions and 
his intention’ to remodel the old Story (Act I, s. 2). 
After "Three Degrees, the Beggar may eventually 
become the King and sit in the Chair of Solomon 


: dedicated to the “dearest Design of Industry,” the 


Emblematic Art being welded to the operative craft, 
92 








“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” 


The Beggar simply “comes” in the First Degree. 
He sees in two. He “over-comes” and is raised 
triumphantly in the Third, 


“I WAS TAUGHT TO BE CAUTIOUS” 


What... is... this... LETTER? 
I am much deceived—but, Z remember the 
STILE. . .. 


FEttow, a worp: Who gave thee this 
LETTER. . . . - 


Come! away. 


Note.—The Quarto: and the Folio again print 
"sTILE" to indicate a short Ladder. The “Fellow” 
remembers the “STEP” which is the first thing he 
must remember in the Pedestal Examination. 


THE POMEGRANATE 


(It was) ripe as the Pomewater (a watery 
apple, a pomegranate) which now hangeth like 
a Jewel in the Ear of the Sky, the Heaven, anon 
falleth like a Crab on the face of the Soil, the 
Land, the rarrn, 


Note.—This is a wonderful reference to the Masonic 
Symbol of the Pomegranate which from “the exuberance 
of the Seed denote plenty” (Ritual). 

Shakespeare thus denotes that Freemasonry is allied 
to the Sun, the Moon, the Stars like the Constellation 
known as “The Crab”; that it hangs in the Heavens 
“like a prapEM”’ (Ritual); that ultimately it will fall 
to the Earth and, like a Crab, it will cresp out of its 
Hiding Place (the hidden holes in which Crabs hide) 
and slowly travel all over the earth through inherent 
Vitality. 

Three hundred years after this was written the 
Author is justified of his prophecy. The seeds of 
the Pomegranate have scattered and borne Fruit the 


93 


[| 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


World over: And the “Crabs” crept out of their 
"Hiding Places" in 1723, the 1623 Shakespeare 
Folio Centenary. I 


CAIN WHO SLEW HIS BROTHER 
MONTHLY MEETINGS 
What was a Monru old at Cain’s Birth though 
not five weeks old yet . . . ? 
The Allusion . . . the Collusion . . . holds in 
the exchange for the Moon which is never but a 


Month old. 


A SIGN 
What a rare Talent. . . . 


Ifa Talent be 4 CLAW, look how he CLAWS 
him with a Talent. 


THE CREATOR OF EMBLEMATIC 
FREEMASONRY 

This is a gift I have simple Simple; a foolish 
extravagant Spirit, full of Forms, Figures, Shapes, 
Objects, Ideas, Apprehensions, Notions, Revolutions. 

‘These are begot in the Ventricle of Memory, 
nourished in the Womb of pia Mater, and 
delivered upon the Mellowing of occasion. . . 

You are a good Member of the Commonwealth 

. where all those pleasures live zha? ART 

would comprehend, KNOWLEDGE the MARK... . 
Well learned is he . . . that Singeth Heaven's 
Praise with such an earthly TONGUE. 


THE RITUAL IN MANUSCRIPT: 
A CRITICISM 
-Let me supervise the Canzonet. Here are 
only Numbers ratified. . . . Elegancy, Facility 
and the Golden cadence of Poetry. . 


94 





"LOVE'S LABOURS LOST” 


Ovidius Naso was the Man . . . for smelling 
out the oderiferous Flowers of Fancy, the Jerks 
of Invention. . . 

Imitation is Nothing: so doth the hound his 
Master; the ape his Keeper. 


Note.—A Canzonet is a composition restricted to 
no set Themes. The critic of the MS. points out that 
the Author has taken and merely ratified the Three 
Degrees of the Ancients (“Numbers ratified”) and 
manipulated them to suit himself, imitating and 
borrowing ideas from a celebrated Roman Poet, 
Ovidius Naso, 43 8.c, This writer’s “Metamorphosis” 
“are extremely curious on account of the different 
Mythological facts they relate.” His Works are 
split into the twelve Signs of the Zodiac. They deal 
with “religious Rites, Ceremonies and Festivals, the 
Theogonies of the ancients.” (Lempritre’s Classical 
Dictionary, p. 470.) 


ARIEL'S WAY 
Trip and Go. . . . 


Note.—See Ariel’s Song in The Tempest for the 
development of the “Trip and Go" theme... 
(applied Masonically) thirty-four years later, 


THE SOCIAL DEGREE 


Before repasr . . . please gratify the Table 
with a GRACE. . .. 


REPLYING TO A TOAST 
++ + On my Privilege . . . I beseech your 
Society. ... 
And thank you, too;. for SOCIETY, saith the 
Text, is the happiness of Life. 


95 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


SECRETS : 
THE INVESTITURE PAT 


. Thou hast thumped him with shy BIRD-BOLT 
under the Left Pap. In Faith szcrers. 


Note.—A Bird-bolt was a short bolt with a heavy 
head used with a cross-bow. It was virtually a replica 
of the Lodge Gavel. The Candidate’s heart is the 
repository of Secrets. The Author indicates the 
“Thump with the Bird-bolt" after the words .. , 
“Gt will never disgrace you.” 


THE MASON OF MANY JEWELS 
He comes in like a prrjurs, wearing Papers. 


Note.—In those days a condemned Perjurer wore 
papers on his breast describing his crimes. The Mason 
to-day wears Jewels which, similarly, tell a story of 
virtuous Acts. The old Elizabethans had the same 
custom. Freemasons are familiar with the Brother 
who comes into the Lodge wearing a padful of Jewels 
on his breast, each being to mark a Record of something 
accomplished. 


THE THREE WHO RULE 


Thou makest the TRiUMvIRY, the Corner-Cap 
of (the) socrery (in) the Shape of Love’s-ryBuRN 
that HANGs up Simplicity. 


Note.—Freemasonty is indeed a “Triumviry” . . . 
‘Three Steps, Three Degrees, Three Principal Officers, 
etc. Tues is the Corner-Cap. At Tyburn criminals 
were often Hung with a Rope, cut down while living, 
the body cut across in the form of a T-Square, the 
bowels being drawn out and burnt . . . if possible 
while the man was:conscious. 


96 





“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” 


The Creator of the Ritual associated the System of 
Charity with this barbarous custom which was peculiar 
to the Elizabethan era, “penalties reminiscent of the 
ac ed says Bro. Waite (Emblematic Masonry, 
Pp. 257). 

Shakespeare knew all about it and accurately called 
it “Love’s-ryBuRN.” À 

The Master Mason can now tell where the Signs, 
ctc, were born .; ; not in Greece, Rome, the 
Medieval era or the Augustan. They are the pure 
product of the Elizabethan era and were very real to 
our Ancient Brethren. We Modernists have forgotten 
the gruesome Customs of the Tudor Age. 


THE FOUNDER OF THE ORDER SPEAKS 


All Hid! All Hid! An Old Infant Play! 
Like a Demi-God here sit I in the Sky, and 
SroRETS heedfully o'er-eye, . . . 

You found this “mors”, the King your 
“more” did see, but I a szam do find in each of 
THREE . . . (ie, Degrees). 

Now step I forth to whip Hypocrisy. . . . To 
see a KING transformed . . ; profound soLowow 
+» +» A CANDLE, Hol 

I will praise a Hand, a Foot, a Face, an Eye, 
a Gait, a State, a Breast, ‘a Waist, a Leg, a 
Limb.... 

We are Pick-Purses in Love . . . who see 
the first opening of the gorgeous EAsT .. , 
blinded by her Majesty... . A gracious Moon 
+, + + an attending srAR . . . where several 
WORTHIES MAKE ONE DIGNITY. . . . O WOOD 
Divine . ... O who can give an oatu? Where 
isa Book? "That I may Swear . . . pARK needs 
no Candles now, for Dark is tron. 


S 97 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF. FREEMASONRY 


GRAFTING THE SPECULATIVE TO THE 
OPERATIVE STEM 


O for some AvTHORITY how to proceed: Some 
TRICKS, some QuiLLETS (ie. legal or historical 
Quibbles) to cheat the Devil (i.e. the spirit of 
intolerant Ignorance). Some saivz for PERJURY, 

Note—The Emblematic System lacked in the 
Elizabethan era any direct connection with Antiquity. 
The operative lodges had been destroyed by State 
Edicts. Some Authority was necessary to dignify its 
claims to “Time Immemorial” through Medieval 
Times. . 

“O, for some Tricks, some Quillets” to cheat the 
Devil of Ignorance that demands that everything of 
import should be dated from the Creation of the 
World (as it actually did in those days). . . ger Tricks 
and Quillets” like the creation of the “Regius Poem 
and the “Cooke MS.” that would serve to indicate 
that. Masonry was known in operative lodges centuries 
past . . . zo cheat the Devil! 


JUSTIFICATION FOR THE GRAFTING 


Is not rove as subtle as Sphinx. . . . O, 


then . . . for Wisdom's sake . . . for Love's 
Sake-. . . for Men's sake . . . let us once lose 
our oatus to find ourselves. . . . It is RELIGION 


to be thus forsworn. . . . For CHARITY itself 
. fulfils the LAW, and who can sever LOVE from 
CHARITY. 
' Advance your stanparns!! 
Now to plain dealing! Lay these GLozss by. 
1 The writing of the Higher Degrees . . . the Knights and 
Sovereign Royal Orders. cie 
The “Glozes” were the “plausible” Manuscripts that were to be 
“laid by"— buried—like the “Regius” and the “Cooke MS:,” to be 
discovered by future Ages: sinxs “rorcED” with Antiquity, 


98 





“LOVE'S LABOURS LOST” 


Acr V 


THE SPECULATIVE CRAFT 


Arrs-man! Prramauzatel We will be singled 
from the barbarous. Do you not educate Youth 
at the Charge-House on the top of the Mountain? 

Or the Hit! 


Note.—‘The Charge-House” meant a FREE School, 
Says Steevens (1766) who thus tries to tell posterity 
that it was an Accepted Lodge for that is peculiarly 
"A FREE SCHOOL," 

The passage is a clear reference to the Old Ritual 
found by Findel in the British Museum where there 
is a blending of operative and speculative customs, 
the Free School on she Top of the Hill being “the 
perfect Lodge.” No one knows who wrote it but the 
"Salve-for-perjury" provides a good clue. 

It is very significant that this Old Ritual should be 
so clearly alluded io immediately after the. Author's 
cry for some “Authority” to enable him to proceed 
with his Ethical System. Such “Authority” could 
only be presumed by a “Trick” or “Quillet,” such as 
the writing of a POEM in archaic language and pen- 
manship which unwary scholars of future Ages would 
naturally assume was dated by its manner and style, 
and belonged to a period Prior to the Elizabethan, 

Yet the blunder would rest with the scholars who 
assumed that the MS. dated itself, and the genius 
with the Creator who could Conceive and execute such 
documents. Nor would this act of Masonic dissimula- 
tion be either a forgery or fraudulent; for the " Regius 
Poem" and the "Cooke MS." make no claims as to 


date, authenticity, genuineness or authorship. Written 


and buried, they are left to be dug up from the British 
Museum for the world to make of them whatever it 
chooses. They who read into such documents what 


99 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


they wish to read (like our expert Bro, Hughan who 
declared the "Grand Lodge MS." was dated by 
internal evidence about 926 . . . until a faded date 
was found, 1583, Dec. 2 5), have only themselves to 
blame if they are mistaken. ` 


A HINT OF LODGE WORKING 
In the Posterior of the Day which the tude 
multitude do call the AFTERNOON, 


The King is — GENTLEMAN. . . . I do 
beseech thee “Remember thy curresiz! . . .” 
` Let it PASS... 


Among other serious DESIGNS . . . but let 
that PASS... 


It will please his Grace ++» but let that 

PASS... 

By the World (ie. the uninstructed world), 

I Recount no Fable: Some certain SPECIAL 

Honours, it pleaseth his Greatness to impart to 

Armado, a Soldier, a Man of Travel . . . but 
let that PASS, 

The very All-ofall is: I DO IMPLORE 
SECRECY. 

The King would have me PRESENT the P... 
S... C... (Le. the Prepared Senior Candidate) 
with some Ostentation, Show or Pageant. . . . 
Il have acquainted you withal to crave your 
assistance, . , , 

You shall presewr before the Nine worrures 
+ + + (with) our Assistants . this Most GALLANT, 
ILLUSTRATE and Learned Gentleman (Armado). - 

Where will you find Men WORTHY enough... ? 

Josxva, Yourself, Myself; and the GALLANT 
Gentleman, Iudas M4CHAB-cus, shall PASS 

< Pompey the Great, : ~ ] 
100 






"LOVE'S LABOURS LOST” 


He is not quantity enough for that WoRTHY’s 
Thumb. He is not so big as the end of his Club. 

Present Hercules in MINORITY. llis Enter and 
Exit shall be by STRANGLING, 

An excellent Device, . - » For the rest of the 
WORTHIES? 

- I will Play THREE myself (i.e. Three Degrees), 
HRICE-woRTHY Gentleman. 

Goodman Dull! Thou hast spoken no Word all 
this while... . We will employ THEE, 

I will play one in the Dance (i.e. the Degree, 


the perambulation) or I will Play on the Tabor 
to the worTHIES. 


Note.—In this passage we get a "Noble Gentleman” 
Who sits as à King in the Chair of Solomon. He is to 
€ Breeted with a Sign, “a Curtesie.” There is to be 
a “PASSING” Ceremony, The Author writes the word 


“The I.M. shall pass Pompey,” ie, the Installed 
Master. (There was no printed character “J” in the 
Elizabethan alphabet. The printed "I" stood for “I” 
and also “J”, It being an interchangeable character, 
the Author makes considerable use of it, In the 
Folio, “Judas” is printed "Iudas," We thus get “the 
er L.. M...” 

There is also to be ani Initiation of Candidates, 
Senior and junior, for one is in minority whose entrance 
is to be by “STRANGLING,” while the other to be 


presented is the P... S... C... the Prepared Senior 
Candidate, — . 


to his rank. Not only is he a Traveller from East to 
West, but he is a Soldier of Masonry, i.e. a Knight of 
one of the Higher Degrees. 

` There are also junior officers in the Lodge designated 
as Assistants, and the “Good Man's” initial “D...” 


Ior 





: 


; 





1 


i 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


tells us that as à "Deacon," he assisted in the Peram- 

bulations, Incidentally we discover that when the 
: Worthies enter the Lodge they are Breeted with 

Music. “I wil] Play on the Tabor. : 

A Club is used for knocking: So, too, is the GAVEL 
of the “W.M.”, 

In oder to indicate his knowledge of the Whispered 
Word of the Third Degree, the Author deliberately 
mis-spells the word “Maccabaeus” in both the Quarto 
and the Folio . , , "making it “macnas.” breakin 
the stem of the Word correctly at the very point where 
the Word splits itself into two, “both having the same 
signification.” 


“Joshua” is the name of a Royal Arch Principal. 


PARTIAL EXPLANATIONS 
We need more LIGHT to FIND your meaning 
out... 
_ Twill parxty end the Argument 
You do it still in «uz DARK, . 
A good concusron, . . 


Note.—In the "Third Degree, the Conclusion, the 
Candidate is, of course, left very much “ry THE DARK," 


THE BEGINNING OF A WORD 


(Itis as) Fair as a text “B” in acopy-book. . . , 
.__O, that your Face were not so full of “O's” 
(Circles). : 
Note that one Character Says "B" and it'is at once 

y 


capped by the other Character adding “O” which is 
the proper way to Letter. 


1 The significant word "Goodman" denotes that the man 


“Dull” is a Mason—one of the “Good Men and true” Tegarded 
as Masons by Bro. Anderson in 1723. . 


102 






























"LOVE'S LABOURS LOST" 


AN OLD CUSTOM 
What was sent to you? 
This crovz| 
Did he not send you twain? 
es! 


Note.—It was customary in the Old Lodges for a 
newly made Brother to present the Brethren with a 
Pair of waiTE Gloves, We thus know that the Author ` 
was well aware that the Brethren wore White GLOVES 
out of memory to HIRAM ABIF, 


À roLLY in wispom HATCHED (that) hath 
wisoom’s WARRANT, 

Note.—Since the Author declares that his Play 
hath a "wannawT" one can well accept the corollary 
that he knew that the LODGE he was Banding would 
have to have a “WARRANT” also. We th 


THE SECRET OF THE PLAY OF L.L.L. 


AN EXPOSURE Or A REHEARSAL 


O, I am Stabbed with Laughter . . . Love 
doth approach Disguised; Armed in Arguments; 
You'll be surprised . . . [ stole into Bie a 
Thicket |.. | and overheard what you shall 
overhear... . A Page that well by uranT had 
conned (i.e. learned) his Embassage (Le. a 
prepared Recital). 

Action and Accent did they seack him, “Thus 
must thou speak and thus thy Body bear, | |” 

(They) clapp’d him on the Shoulder... One 


rubbed "his Ellow—ruus . , and swore a 
better Specch was never made before, 
103 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Another, with his Finger and his Thumb, cried 
“via (i.e. this way) we will do it,” 

The Third, he capered and cried, “All goes 
well." 

The Fourth turned on the Toe. ++ So 
profound. . . . 

Ridiculous appears . . . Passion's Solemn 
Tears . . . where everyone his LOVE-FEAT (FEET) 
Advance. 


r yt 






MEMORIZING THE RITUAL 
While it is spoke each turn away (the) face. 
Why that contempt would kill the Speaker's 


Heart, and quite divorce Ais Memory from his 
Part. 


THE BOARD OF INSTALLED MASTERS 
A Holy Parcel that ever rurnep their Backs 
to Mortal Views, 
Their Eyes . . . their Eyes... , 
rue... 
“Voucusarz . . ." etc, etc, (see Esotery), 


MASONIC SPEECH 

What would these Strangers . . . ? Do they 
speak our Language? .. . Know what they 
wouldl 

We have measured many miles. . . . 

Tell how many Juches doth fill upone Mile... ? 
We measure them by srgps, . . . : 

VoucusarE-to show the suw-shine of your 
face that we may worship it. 

My face is but a moon and Clouded too. 

Voucusare bright Moon and these thy srars 
to shine (ie. the Sun, Moon and the Seven 
Stars of Masonry as the Ritual Lecture of the 
First Tracing Board). She is the moon and I 


104. 









BO 





“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” 


the waw. ("Man" used esoterically is a cover 
word for mason in this instance and in others.) 
The music plays! YOUCHSAFE some Motion 
to it. 

Our Ears VOUCHSAFE it. 

But your Legs should do it. Since you are 
STRANGERS and have come by chance . . , 
TAKE HANDS. ... 

HY... THEN. . . . 

Curtsie . . . (Masonically: Ste ; Grip, Sign), 

We cannot of bought. M : a PSE 

If you deny. . . . Let's hold some chat. 

In private then. 

Whnrrz-HANDED M... one worn. 

Honey, and Milk and Sugar: there is Three 
(ie. H, M., S. The Sun, the Moon and the 
Master Architect of the Lodge, Hiram). 

Nay! TwoTreys . . . halfa dozen. ("T.T." 
an Elizabethan Symbol for the Two Pillars of 
Masonry, “Thirty-Three,” etc. The “TT.” 
is to be found in many books of Rosicrosse 
origin.) 

Seventh . . . Adieu; since Jou can cog! (To 
“cog” Dice is to manipulate them so that they 
may fall in a given way. The Author shows that 
he can “coc” Words before the dialogue ends, 
The “Seven” refers to the Seven Liberal Arts 
and Sciences and to the number required to 
form a perfect Lodge.) 

One WORD in SECRET .., VOUCHSAFE to 
CHANGE a WORD, 

Name it... . 2 i 

You have a povge-roncur within your Mask. 

Let's PAnT THE wonp. 

Nol I'll not be your HALF. . . 

{Bre Word in private . . , 
Bleat softly then . . , 


105 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 
T The “Tongues of Mocking Wenches 


are as keen 
CAT |A ` | As is the Razor’s edge invisible 
c Cutting a smaller hair than may be 
seen... ` 
Above the sense of sense: so sensible 
AS Seemeth their conference . . , 
Not one worp more. . . . Break off. 
++. Break off. . ., 


Note.—The Author has "Cogged" the Words so 
that the Initial Capitals in the last lines spell two 


syllables “Bo” and “as” which are split by the intro- ` 


duction of the word “car” descriptive of the “mocking 
wench” in the text. This clearly indicates pesien, 
The conjoined syllables on either side of the “car” are 
known to Freemasons the world over. The Word is 
hot only “PARTED” but “HALVED AND LETTERED,” 

The Word “voucusare” is particularly known to 
the BOARD OF INSTALLED MASTERS, [ts repetition is 
to direct attention to the fact that Shakespeare was a 
Past Master, 


`. A COMMENT ON THE AUTHOR'S 
COGGING . 

This retLow . . . is Wit’s Pedlar and retails 
his Wares at Wassails (Health-Drinking) and 
MEETINGS. . . . 

. This is the Ape of Form. . . . He Plays at 
TABLES, chides the Dice in Honourable Terms. 

+ . . Pay him the Due of "Honey-Tongued." 

All HAIL! ... CONSTRUE my SPEECHES 
BETTER if you may. .. . I 

This jest is Dry to me. . . . Your wir makes 
WISE THINGS FOOLISH. ... A Superfluous Case 
that up the Wor... A... 

Thus Pour the Stars down Plagues for Perjury. 
Here Stand 1. , . Bruise me... Thrust me 

106 








‘“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST” 


D Cutme, ee Taffeta phrases, silkier Terms 
precise. Three-Piled Hyperboles, spruce Affecta- 


tion, Figures Pedantical . . - I po ronswzanl 
I here Protest by THIS WHITE oLove) I have a 
rick, . 


TLL LEAVE IT BY DEGREES... 
Lord have Mercy on those THREE, 


THE FREEMASON 
You are not FREE . sda 


No! They are FREE that gave those TOKENS 
to us. 


What did he wutsper in your EAR. 


‘SIGNS AND SYMBOLS 


I knew by this yeweL he did wear, ©.. The 


n 
ae Following the sions woo'’d but the sicn 
of S... 


THE SQUARE 


Do you not Know Ty . . . FOOT by the 
. SQUIER (i.e, the Square Rule). . 


"I NOW PLACE YOU" (ie. 45 an Installed 
Master) > 


And STAND BETWEEN his Back, Sir, and the 
Br (Footstool), 

Holding a T... Gie. a T-Square), I.. 

- ++ (Le. Installing Master), 


` Dié when you will, a swock (an Apron) shall 
be your Shroud. . . . 
Full M;.. (Masonically) hath. shis Career been 
.RUN. Lo, He is Tilting Straight! Peace! | 
have done. . 


107 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THREE WORTHIES SEEK ADMISSION 


They would know whether the THREE WORTHIES 
shall come in? 

What! Are there but THREE? 

Nol But it is verra fine, for every ONE pursents 
(presents or represents) THREE (i.e. every Master 
Mason represents Three Degrees). 

Three times thrice is Nine. 

Not so, Sir, under correction. . . . ; 

By Jove, I always took Three Threes for Nine. 

The Parties themselves . . . will show where- 
until it doth amount . . . 7o Perfect one Man, 
one POOR MAN. ... 

I KNOW NOT THE DEGREE OF THE 
WORTHY. 

Gol Bid them prepare. . . 

We will take some care. . . . 

But there are wonrurss a-coming will speak 
their Mind in some other Sort. . 

Note.—This definitely indicates that there were 
WORTHIES that were familiar with the Language of 
the Higher Degrees . . . Masons who knew more 
than the Three Craft Degree Ceremonial. To 
“PERFECT” a man is a very clear reference to one 
of the most notable of the Higher Degrees; the 
“Rose Croix.” 


A STRANGE BROTHER 
Doth this Man serve God? 


Why? 
He speaks not like à Man of God's MAKING. 


AN OFFICER'S REMARK 


But I hope I was Perfect: I made a little 
Fault, 1... G... (Inner Guard) : 


108 





Pay 


C 


N 





"LOVE'S LABOURS LOST” 


THE UNIVERSAL SYSTEM 


By East, West, North and South, I spreap 
my Conquering Might. 


THE MASONIC WAY 


I come with this APoLocy. 


Keep some State in thy zx. . .. 


THE EXAMINATION 

STAND ASIDE... . 

Hercules is presented, 

Iudas I am. 

"A" Iudas! 

Not Iscariot . . . Machabeus (in the Folio all 
the intervening words after Judas are printed 
in italics so that the next Roman Letter may 
begin with the “C” in "Clipt)". 

Clipt is plain Iudas. 

How are thou proved Iudas? (This is the next 
direct question which brings in the “n” in 
“How,” the intervening aside being “a xissinc 
TRAITOR,” a very significant phrase Masonically, 
for Masons “Kiss the Book.” 

Iudas I am. 

What mean you? 

Begin. 

Iudas was hanged on an Elder. (Note that 
the Elder Tree was the Acacia Tree.) 

HAT Is THIS? 

A CitterN Head: The Head of a BodkiN: a 
riNg: an old coiN; The carved boNe-face. . . . 
(It ts) IN a brooch: IN a brooch of lead: worn 
IN a cap. ' 


109 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


(These are interjections made by different 
Characters in the play. Five of the words contain 
the letter "i," the last three phrases containing 
the word “tn” as a concluding syllable. 


The Author thus gives the last letter and 
syllable of the Masonic Word indicated in the 
Capital Initials. The Word is again not only 
Lettered but Halved ... “ry.” 

The Cittern Head symbolically denoted “a 
crip,” for to play it one has to take a “crip” of 
the Head; the old Coin is a TOKEN,” etc. 

In this subtle manner Shakespeare lets the 
discerning Masonic Reader know that he is 


quite familiar with what actually goes on at the 
_ Pedestal.) 


He is an Ass. Let him go! Adieu Sweet Iudel 
Nay, why dost thou sray? 


For the Latter end of the NAME. 


For the Ass to the Iude: Give it to him; 
ludas AWAY. — 


. Note.— This dialogue is a faithful camouflaged 
representation ofthe Candidate'sPedestal Examination. 
He stands at the side. He is presented, the proper 
questions asked, the word given in.a peculiar manner, 
the grip and token indicated, and the “away” given. 

TE the syllable “Ass” in the mock-word “Iudas” be 
conjoined with the “s” and “o” of the Copy Book 
(already noted under the caption “Partial Explana- 
tions”) there is revealed the same subtle workmanship 
of esoteric Masonic Knowledge: 

There is again in the passage the purposeful mis- 
spelling of another word "Macuaneus" to indicate 
something whispered. : 

By the necessary “Words” the Three Degrees stand 
openly revealed, 


iio 





“LOVE’S LABOURS LOST" 


A LODGE INCIDENT 


A neum for Iudas]. It grows DARK! Ee may 
Stumble. 


THREE SYMBOLS 
I do adore thy . . . surpper, 
: « + By the Foor. 
He may not by the yarn. 


A FELLOW GRAFT 
Frrtow Héctor .. . is gone... (He is) 
TWO MONTHS on the Way... . 
Note——This constitutes direct proof that the 
Elizabethans gave but One Degree a MONTH as we 


do to-day, Masonically, a Fellow Craft is rwo MONTHS 
ON THE WAY. 


THE APRON AND THE CASE 
Master, let me take you a button-hole lower, 
Do you not see YE P.M. PO. (ic. Your Past 
Master, (the) Potentate) is uncasine? What mean 

Jou. You will lose your reputation. . . . 
Note.— The direct question “What mean you?" is 
a sly hint to throw the real word in the text which is 
“POMPEY” into an anagram of letters (Y.E.P.M.P.O.) 
and decode Masonically. Anagram making: was a 

universal fashionable literary pastime in those days, 


THE APRON 
I'll be sworn he wore . . . but a dishclout. 


- * « Ánd rHaT he wears next his HEART for a 
FAVOUR. .'. . 


And by these sapczs understand the xine. 
III 























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


DEATH 
The King... (is) 
Dead for my ug... 


My Taz is Told . . , 
For my Part, I breathe pres Breath ... 
I will uiu myself like à SOLDIER, 


Note.—As a Freemason of the Craft, the speaker is 
Free to Join the Higher Degrees and to become a 
Knight (a Soldier) of one of the Mystical Degrees, 


THE COMEDY IS A MERE PADDING 

ROUND A VITAL REALITY 

For your Fair Sakes have we neglected Time, 
played foul with our oarus + +» even to the 
OPPOSITE ENDS OF OUR INTENTS: And 
what in us hath seemed ridiculous . . . full of 
unbefitting strains . . . wanton + + full of 
STRAY SHAPES, of HABITS and of FORMS . . . have 
misbecomed our oarH& and GRAVITIES, 

Those Heavenly Eyes that look into our 
Faults have tempted us to mak. ... We to 
ourselves prove False by being ONCE FALSE 
FOR EVER TO BE TRUE, 

A stn thus purifies itself and turns to Grace! 


We rated them as PLEASANT JEST . . . a$ 
BOMBAST (Padding) and as 1rwixo to the Time. 


Note.—The foregoing makes it quite clear that 
Shakespeare chose this Method of associating himself 
permanently with the Fraternity: that he buried the 
genesis of the Order in the Comedy... “the 
Opposite ends of our Intents." He admits that he 


112 





"LOVE'S LABOURS LOST" 


Was "Once false" to the secrets of the Fraternity, 
that he might be “For ever rue to himself” declaring 
Secretly in the only possible way that he was the 


Father and Founder of the Ethical Society. 


THE GRAND MASTER MASON'S PRAYER 
TO THE CRAFT 


With THREE-FOLD LOVE, I wish yov all THESE 
THREE, 


THE INSTALLATION 
Remote from the World. . . . Stay until the 
Twelve Celestial Signs have brought about their 
Annual Reckoning. . . . CHANGE not... . Nip 
not the gaudy Blossoms of rovg. . Bear this 
Trial and Last Love, then, at the expiration of 
ONE YEAR . . . Challenge, Challenge . . . by 
these Deserts . . ; intitled in the . . . Heart 

-+ - A TWELVE MONTH shall you spend. 

Note.—Modern Editors usually delete several lines 

in these passages as mere repetitions, ' 


Tue Epmocur 


TO THE WRITER OF THE PLAY 


Oft have I heard of you. . . . The World's 
loose Tongue proclaimed you for a Man replete 


with mocks, full of comparisons . - * Which you 
‘on all Estates will execute that lie within |., 
YOUR WIT. 


THE SERIOUSNESS OF THE JEST 
Visit the speechless sick, converse with 
groaning wretches, enforce the pained impotent 
to smile. To move wild laughter in the Throat 
of Death . . . is the way to choke a Jibing Spirit 
whose influence is begot of that loose Grace 
H 113 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


which shallow-laughing HEARERS give to 
FOOLS. 
The Prosperity of a Jest Hes ix the EAR of 
HIM that HEARS IT. 
Note.—This not only indicates what Freemasonr 
stands for but also is confirmatory of the fact that the 


. Play must not be taken at its face value... “like 


shallow laughing hearers at roors" but that it must 
be studied to find its esoteric meaning. 


SO MOTE IT BE 


This time-honoured Masonic phrase is given very 
ingeniously in Act III, Folio, page 129. 

In the play is a character spelt “moru.” He is 
introduced on p- 124, “Enter Armado and worn." 

"This person is zever given his name throughout the 
play. He is referred to in the Headings and Dialogues 
as a “Boy” or a- “PAGE,” see Folio, page 128. His 
name is thus deliberately suppressed by the writer of 
the play for some reason. 

Modern Editors alter "Enter . . . Boy" or "Enter 
Page” to “Enter morn” or “Re-enter MOTH.” 

The correct phonetic sound of “Moth” is “MOTE.” 

Prof. F. A. Marshall Says "Grant White suggests 
that ‘Moth’ should be written ‘more’ as ‘this was 
clearly thus pronounced.’ ” (Irving Ed., Vol. 1, p- 2.) 

As a matter of fact, the Author specifically draws 
attention to the correct sound of the word by spelling 
the word “moter” incorrectly twice on page 134, line 2, 
in the very significant lines (to a Mason): 


“You found his Moth, the King your Moth 
did see, 
But Í a Beame doe finde in each of three.” 
This is a direct allusion to the Scriptural Mote and 
Beam in the Eye. 
"The Author pointedly wishes you to notice that 


I1. 








"LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST” 


where “mora” is used, it has zhe French pronunciation 
. + © “MOTE,” as the play is cast on the Continent. 

In the body of the text the name is given twice in 
Act I, p. 125, with a Masonic significance, 


Boy: What shall some see? 


C.: Nothing, Master Moth (“M.M.”=Master 
Mason), but what they look upon, 


In the other place the dialogue runs: 


Brag: Who was Sampson’s love, my deare 
Moth? . 


Boy: A W... M... (Worshipful Master). 


In Act III the word again appears twice closely 
together in the body of the text, page 129, in a 
dialogue scene of word-play which begins: 


"Some Enigma, some Riddle,” and ends ‘Doth 
the Inconsiderate take Salve for l Envoy and the 
word L’Envoy for a Salve?” 


Now F. A. Marshall (p. 57) says: “It is evident 
that Moth here intends a pun upon the word Salve, 
Latin; 4 WORD USED BY THE ROMANS AT 
PARTING. ...1 can find no other sense in the 
question." 

The word “envoy” means “the conclusion: a short 
stanza by itself and serving oftentimes as a DEDICA- 
TION OF THE WHOLE.” (Cotgrave, Irv. Ed. 
Shak. Plays, Vol. 1, VA 

In this short scene-—which revolves round an 
“Enigma... a Riddle,” that is a play on words 
which no one understands, but which somehow refers 
to “the CONCLUSION of something” and also refers to 
"Something sarb AT PAmTING" (a short Stanza that 
Serves as a DEDICATION of the WHOLE)—we find the 
Boy’s name with the sound of “MOTE” mentioned 
twice in the text in the following passage which 
concludes a dialogue between two speakers, 


115 





. SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


The first words of each speaker are given in 
Consecutive order. 
- 128, col. 2, last Line, 
i 2 (P. 128, e.) 
The... 
Cable-Tow c.r, Come ; .. 


Brother B By... 


True True... 
B. But tell me . . , 
I will tell you sensibly, 
IT IT Thou hast no feeling of it Moth - 
MOTE (i.e. Motz), 
We We will talk more of this matter, 
Till Till there be more MATTER eee 
Sirra Costard, I will infranchise 
; thee. 
so so {O Marrie me to one Francrs. I 
smell some l'envoy, some goose 
in this, (4 Goose is the end of 
Marker according to a French 
Proverb.) 
B i By my sweete soul I mean setting 
thee at Liberty, 
True, True let me loose. 
IT IT (I give thee Liberty, set thee free 
from durance . . , 
Moth (i.e. mors) Moth (ie. MOTE) FoLLow! 


(Page) Like the Sequel, I. 

In the above the Author tells the Reader to “rottow 
mote like rottowine the Sequel . . . I". which 
letter “I” is to be found on the last line, being the 
first Initial Letter, I 

By following the Initial Capitals after “I”, all the 
by-play in the scene is explained . . . for we get: 
e ote. rr. B. so. Till. We; Mote. rr. B. True. B: 

-I. A. - 


116 














"LOVES LABOURS LOST" 
These Initial Capitals and Words clearly stand for: 


MOTE IT BE SO TILL WE (MEET): MOTE 
IT BE TRUE, BROTHER: A CABLE-TOW. 


The double repetition of the phrase after “morts”, 
the fact that the Author tells the reader to “roLLow 
‘more’ ” which he identifies with the letter "I": that 
the allusions are to a “PARTING”, to a “CONCLUSION”, 
to a phrase that is a “peprcation” of the whole, which 
is exactly apropos to Masonic Meetings . . . make 
it absolutely certain that here we hvae the Masonic 
Motif which came into being out of the air mysteriously 
into the Speculative Craft: 


“SO MOTE IT BE.” 


. The germ of the phrase was the scriptural “Mote” 
which the Author associated with the “Beam” found 
in each of the Three Degrees in one form or another, 
“May it be TRUE,” a “C-T"s” Circle of Truth, 

The foregoing text-extracts are by no means 
exhaustive. The discerning student can easily quad- 
tuple such examples. There is already, however, too 
great a mass, the details too definite, to permit anyone 
to assert that such phraseology was the result of blind, 
unconscious CHANCE, 

Even a man who is not a Mason can detect the 
peculiar tang of the Craft which pervades the openly 


written word. 


Every Freemason will know at once that they are 
distinctly Masonic. "The hand of the dyer has become 
subdued to what it works in. The written thought of 
the Author ran naturally to Ethical Symbolism because 
he must have been ‘a Mason par excellence... 
saturated Masonically to the finest fibre of his being, 
the living tissues of his mind, : 

The essential secrets of Masonry are pointedly 
indicated but they are veiled in the proper Masonic 


117 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


way. They are to be known only by those who 
understand. : 

“L.L.L.” clearly indicates, when stripped of the 
"Comedy-verbiage", the GENESIs OF THE FRATERNITY, 
It could only have been written round a System actually 
in being in 1589; the date the play was written. It 
could, moreover, only have been written by one who 
was above the “vow” as the “Father and Founder” 
—and therefore had the right to break it in order to 
identify himself secretly as the cREATOR AND FOUNDER 
OF THE ETHICAL CRAFT so that some day it could be 
discovered and revealed. 

No Master Mason to-day nor Provincial nor GRAND 
LODGE OFFICER has the right to "write, indite, mark- 
or engrave" such secrets. Never has any Mason 
lived save ons who pare have done it. Never has 
ahy Mason lived who couto have done it ih such 
a subtle manner. ‘That one man was the FATHER oF 
THE FRATERNITY, the man described by his friends 
as "A WORTHY FELLOW” and associated him with the 
SEVEN SET SQUARES, the MASTER ARCHITECT who 


conceived the Ethical Temple of King Solomon: 
SHAKESPEARE. 


; 118 





THE LAST PAGE OF 'THE COMEDIES: 
"THE WINTER'S TALE" 












































The Winters Tale. 303 atures 

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y 
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PEPES pa 


iis The Names ofthe Agors. 
= EM 
































a, 
Lneweet Reng of Suestea, n | Emden Lady. s Y 
LOTES magias 720 Cm Rep f Blhera. e c 
c 2 5 D lena, Peer d Blemss A eed. 
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phere Lemsedtiomioe £7 timete P i 

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From Secret Shakespearian Seals, 


This is the last page of the Comedies and it again yields the Secret Seals 287 and 157. 


These Numerical Seals run throu; 
selves, but also in many of the Son; 
characters. Chance is absolutely precluded by the fact of its unerring repetition. The 
“Count’’ is always to be found as a ToraL somewhere, 

The “Sonnets” are Sealed in a similar fashion (also his poems “The Rape of 
Lucrece,”’etc.}, both at the beginning and the end, also in many individual Sonnets. 


ighout the entire Folio, not only in the plays them- 
gs introduced into the mouths of their respective 


Puate VII 
(See page 193) 


























“POEMS 
WRITTEN BY WIL. SHAKE-SPEARE. GENT. 


Printed at London by Tho. Cotes, and are to be sold by John Benson, dwelling 
in St. Dunstans Church-yard. 1640.” 











tenowned Shakeffoar3 5 vule yf ih age | H 





jp ! delight: thé wonder of thc tage .:] 37 

^i " PP 
‘ature her self, was proud of his defignes. : 35 
Ind joyd to weare the drefrig of. hip imer. 35 
& leårhéd is works are fuchy | 36 
fit 2 34 
Hoo 
29 
1o 
ig 


Portrair oF SHAKSPER 
In Sonnets, 1640 Edition. 


The above Title was attached to the Book which contained for the first time 
for public consumption the Sonnets of Shakespeare. The Quarto numbered “r609” 
from which they were taken was a secret Masonic Book and remained unknown to 
the world for several generations. In the “Benson Medley” the Sonnets were 
arranged in quite a different order and in groups with headings of a literary and 
impersonal character. Between the hitherto unknown Sonnet-groups werc sand- 
wiched well-known poems of Shakespeare. Such was the way in which the unknown 
Sonnets were introduced to the world and gradually became accepted as part of 
the Shakespearian Canon in the absence of Manuscripts. ^ 

"The lines count 292, the numerical signature of “Wm. Shakespeare" (K. Cypher). 

The gauntlet on the wrist, the gloved hand, and the sprig of laurel or acacia 
have a Masonic significance. 


Prate VIIJ 




















VI 


THE TEMPEST: 
SHAKESPEARE’S LAST MASONIC PLAY 


“T have given you a THREAD of My OWN LiFE.” 
"(I was) Prospero the Prime. .,., Reputed in Dignity 
and for THE LIBERAL ARTS Without à PARALLEL, . S 


THE TEMPEST, 


had been printed previously but were now reprinted 
some being altered so considerably that they almost 
were "new-made." One that had never been printed 
was The Tempest. Tt is placed first in the Folio, but 
scholars are virtually agreed that it was the last 
written, They also agree that this is the play that 
contains personal references to the Author in a variety 
of ways, that it was his “Farewell” to the World 
through the mouth of “Prosper-o.” 

he scene is cast on an uninhabited island that has 
no location. Prospero is described as “Master of a full 
poore Cell . . . and thy no greater FATHER,” In 
this cELL, he wears Magic Robes. He is surrounded 
with invisible Intelligencies that do his bidding. He 
has a daughter named Miranda and a Servant—an 
uncouth human named Caliban. On the shores are 
cast a ship-wrecked King and his courtiers, Through 
the Art of Prospero they go through a series of trials 
- + + from storm, lightning and thunder to the sublime 
Spectacle of the Opening heavens, 


119 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


"T have given you a THREAD of my own life,” says 
Prospero. 

As a matter of fact there are many personal threads 
in the play. "There is a broad unr that one at least 
is Masonic, for the first word of the text of the play 
(Eolio, p. 1) is “master”, which is given a line to itself 
and is printed in italics, while the last word is 
"FREE" (p. 19). I 

In view of the suspicious Signals in the Preface (the 
Seven set squares and the “B.” “J.”, etc.), one would 


naturally expect to find in the first play the Golden: 


Thread of Masonry running through the Story—a 
Thread that is “veiled in allegory and illustrated by 
symbol.” The conclusion of a scholar who, fifty years 
ago, wrote with an insight that has never been 
surpassed, is this: 

“The Finale of The Tempest proves that we 
have here the Idealism of the mystgrtss them- 
selves portrayed to us” (Shakespeare and the 

^ Rosierucians, p. 48, W. F. C. Wigston). 


The moment, however, that we touch the Mysteries, 
we touch Freemasonry. Behind the Speculative 
System stands the Ancient Wisdom. This fact in 


` itself provides a clue that Shakespeare, The Tempest, 


the Mysteries and Freemasonry are inextricably 
intermingled, 

A modern writer, Colin Still, expands the opinion 
of Wigston in a very illuminating and careful study 
by detailed analysis. He entitles his work, The 
Tempest; Shakespeare's Mystery Play. "These are some 
of his conclusions: 

“The Tempest corresponds with significant 
accuracy to the Pagan ceremonies (p. 13)... . 
It contains numerous points of resemblance to 
“the Rites of Initiation (p. 32). : 

“If Shakespeare had not consciously in mind the 
Pagan Initiatory Rites, he must have had in mind 

120 





“THE TEMPEST” 


Some prototypical Concepts to which those Rites 
conformed (p. 75). 

“The theory that Shakespeare at the height of 
his creative power deliberately collected a number 
of fragmentary records whose meaning he did 
not clearly understand, and ingeniously fitted 
them together for the simple purpose of illustrating 
the outward form of ancient Initiation ceremonies 
is not one likely to commend itself... . Yet a 
remarkable similarity does exist between the 
play and Pagan Rites (p. 83) . . . of natural 
symbolism (p. 86)... an ascent through a 
seven-fold scale of THREE MAIN sTAGES . . . the 
prototypical THREE DEGREES of all Pagan Rites, 
Purification, SelfConflict, pgaru (p. 110). 

"The Tempest is a Theological Heresy judged by 
the standards of Shakespeare's day (p. 205). 

"Assuming that he was aware of the more 
important implications of the comprehensive 
allegory, we may assume that he took some pains 
to conceal its inner meaning (p. 207). 

“Is it not probable that The Tempest is the 
expression of a DEFINITE AND COHERENT 
MORAL PHILOSOPHY?" (p. 238). 


Is it not remarkable that this writer, through pure 
literary methods and classical knowledge, should 
arrive at the conclusion that this particular play deals 
with a system of MORAL INSTRUCTION which finds an 
exact parallel in Modern Freemasonry? 


“A Theological Heresy . . . a Sevenfold 
Scale . . . Three Degrees . . . a Comprehen- 
sive Allegory . . . a definite and coherent Moral 
Philosophy. . . . He took PAINS TO CONCEAL 
ITS INNER MEANING. . . . He must have had in 
mind either the Pagan Rites or some other concepts 
TO WHICH THOSE RITES CONFORMED.” 


Does not the evidence of these two scholarly 
121 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Witnesses make it abundantly clear that behind the 
First Folio play there is a Hidden “someruinc’”? 
The fact is that just as we get in L.L.L. the hidden 
genesis of the Fraternity, thirty years later we get 
a clear vision in The Tempest of the way in which 
Shakespeare leaves a recorD of the grafting of 
the modern Mystery of Freemasonry to the ancient 
one . . . the Mysteries which truly date “from TIME 
IMMEMoRIAL.” The evidence of Messrs. Wigston and 
Still proves that Shakespeare had a thorough know- 
ledge of the Ancient Wisdom. It will be seen, on 
examining the play through a Freemason’s eyes, that 
he associated Modern Freemasonry with it in specific 
details. 

Without going into the minutiz of the researches 
of these scholars (they are Books to be studied quietly) 
let us assume that there is a classical element in the 
play. It-will serve as a-nasz to ascertain whether such 
allusions to the Ancient Rites have in any sense a 
Masonic connection. 

The first open classical allusion that stands promi- 
nent is one to'ZEneas in Act II, s. 1. It occurs in a 
passage quite irrelevant to the progress of the play. 
It has obviously been dragged in purposely—and even 
repeated—for some reason. It is always cut out for 
stage acting (see Irv, Ed.). 

` A: Tunis was never graced before with such 
a paragon to their Queen. 

B.: Not since WIDOW Dido's time. 

A.: WIDOW? How came that WIDOW in? 
WIDOW Dido? 

B.: What if he bad said “Widower Æneas” 
too? Good Lord! How (do) you take it? 

A.: WIDOW Dido, said you? You make me 
study of that. She was of Carthage, not Tunis. 

G.: This Tunis, Sir, was Carthage. 


122 





“THE TEMPEST” 


G.: We were talking that our garments seem 
as fresh as when we were at Tunis, at the marriage 
of your daughter who is now Queen. 

A.: And the rarest that e'er came there. 

S.: Reckoning, I beseech you, Z"IDOJZ Dido. 

A.: O WIDOW Dido? I, WIDOW Dido, 


This irrelevant dialogue contains the classical word 
“Æneas . ..." "Widower ZEneas. . . . How do you 
take it?” 

It is to be taken as a veiled allusion to the Mysteries. 
Virgil’s ZEneid VI begins with the arrival of Æneas 
in Cumae, a harbour in Naples, from Tunis or Carthage. 
Here Æneas made his “Descent into Hell,” a poetic 
account of AN INITIATION according to the Ancient 
Mysteries. He fled from the lure of the world, and 
the end was purification and initiation into a Higher 
World of spiritual knowledge. 

The shipwrecked King in The Tempest play was, 
similarly, ox the way to Naples. Like Æneas, he was 
“a Traveller from East to West.” Now “why did 
Shakespeare,” asks Colin Still, “having all the Seven 
Seas to choose from, select the one with the /Eneid VI 
association?" f 

Shakespeare knew what he was doing because he 
was “A WORTHY FELLOW.” He associated the journey 
of a King over a route which he knew led Æneas to 
a participation in a Ceremonial Rite. Not only do the 
King and ZEneas travel from East to West, but so, 
too, does every Initiate in Freemasonry. 


“Whence come you? The East! Whither 
directing your course? The West!” 


the inducement being to search for certain definite 
secrets which may be found by personal industry and 
instruction. . 

"The association of wrpow Dido with ZEneas provides 
a clue and a hint of profound import. 


123 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


In the two dialogues the phrase is repeated THREE 
times. . . . The Author forces special attention to 
i “Widow Dido! O .Widow Didol J, Widow 
Dido.” 

^. Modern Editors alter the Folio “I, Widow Dido!” 
to “Ay! Widow Dido!” 

‘The Author, however, wrote the phrase to make a 
personal connection between the living speaker and 
the dead widow. How? He wants to make the 
reader "study that" also] To see the connection between 

the Ancient Mysteries and the Modern One. 


Widow Dido was of Carthage of the land of 


Pheenicia. 


“The Carthagians were indebted to the Tyreans 
for their origin, manners, language, customs, 
laws, usages” (Hist, of Carthage, Vol, I, p. 89, 
Rollins). I ` 


It was from tyre that Solomon got his artificers 
through Hiram, King of Tyre, and his Architect, 
Hiram Abif, who was “a WIDOW'S SON.” All 
Freemasons are Brothers to Hiram Abif, and therefore 
“Sons of the WIDOW,” for there is only one wipow 
in Freemasonry and she lived in Tyre. It is therefore 
manifest that the Author wishes to indicate that if 
Queen Dido is related through Æneas to the Mysteries 
of Virgil, she Widow Dido is related, similarly, through 
every Master Mason to the Mysteries of Freemasonry. 

“You make me study of that!” Of course! For 
“I, Widow Dido” indicates a connection ... a 
personal one, a filial relationship according to the 
Legend of the Ritual. 

Could this covert allusion have been written without 
a twined knowledge of the Mysteries and she Hiram 
Legend of the Third Degree? 

It is manifestly absurd to think so. 

» In each dialogue “Widow Dido” is repeated THREE 
TIMES as though to give a further indication that the 


124 


re PEE a ECT Cte 





“THE TEMPEST” 


Author knew the Masonic Story of Hiram and its 
Correct place in the Ritual Degrees. 

Even a non-Mason like Wigston saw the significance 
of this passage years ago, but he cried to the deaf ears 
of Masonic Scholars, They were stopped (and still 
are) with the dust of medieval operative creedal 
customs. He says :— 

“The strangest feature of the Play is the 
bringing in of Dido, Widow Dido and Æneas of 
Carthage or Tunis. Jt is a most striking and 
suggestive Masonic hinte... 

“Directly we read of Dido our minds go back 
to the foundation of Carthage . . . the land of 
Phoenicia, of the Phoenix, Libya. | Of Perdita in 
The Winter's Tale is written, ‘She came from 
Libya.’ Here again we are at once in touch 
with Solomon and Hiram, and therefore of 
Masonry. . . . 

“In Pericles we have Tyre again, for Pericles 
is Prince of Tyre. . . . Tt is striking to find 
these Plays profoundly in touch with the Land of 
Masonry, of Solomon, Hiram, Dido. i 

“Tyre is the most Masonic City we can think 
of, since Hiram Abif, Solomon’s Great Architect 

- who plays such an important part in the 
Degrees came from there, . . . 

"Tyre was the City of Pythagoras from whom 
the Masonic historians extract the earliest origin 
of their Symbols. : 

“The Dido passage is pregnant with profound 
significance. . . . In certain Masonic Degrees 
there is the substitution of the Candidate for 
Hiram . . , hence the origin of the expression, 
used sometimes for Masons, the ‘Widow’s Son.’ 

"Is there no xzv hidden in this or hint that 
may throw light? The passage is quite outside 
the Play and is either sheer nonsense or a hint 
of profound import" (pp. 120-135). 

125 









SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


‘There is a Key in the play. It is in the form of a 
Cypher used by Masons to-day. It is the initial letter 
code used in the privately printed Rituals—such as 
“J.W.” to indicate “The Junior Warden," etc. 
Throughout the whole of the two great Masonic plays, 
Love's Labours Lost and The Tempest, it runs from the 
first line to the last. It steadily persists down all the 
Capitals of the first lines in consecutive order, Here is 
a slight example where the actual text of the play is 
elucidated Masonically by the Code. 


THE ORACLE 


` And there is in this business more than Nature 
Was ever conduct of: Some Oracle 
Must rectify our knowledge. 


The Tempest, Act V, s. 1, line 242. 


In a Freemason’s Lodge the “Oracle” that speaks 
with authority on things Masonic is a Worshipful 
Master. Since the Author wishes the discerning 
reader to know she hind of Oracle he has in his mind, 
he writes the lines so that the first letters of the three 
lines spell “A W.M.” All Masons know that this 
is the abbreviated Ritual Code for “A Worshipful 
Master,” 

Wigston was not a Mason and therefore never 
tumbled to the Key of the Ritual Code in the play. 
The elucidation of the plays by this Code is outside 
the scope of this little work, but the above illustration 
is sufficient that the “ninr” of the Widow was indeed 
of profound import. One can well imagine that 
among the Elizabethan Masons, the query “Who is 
Widow Dido?” was as well understood as the more 
modern one—which has survived from those days—— 
“How old is your Grandmother?” CT... think 
Nobly of my GRANDMOTHER,” The Tempest, 
Act I, s. 2. E 

It ind the play in very truth as “A Mystery 

126 














"THE TEMPEST" 


Play." It can be proved that it is associated even 
more closely with Freemasonry than the Ancient 
Mysteries: For there is no Hiramic Myth in the Mysteries, 
but there is in Masonry and also in The Tempest.” 

In Act III, -s. 2 (note that Act IHi—the Third 
Degree) there is a further allusion to the Hiram Story. 
"Three Varlets . . . Confederates . - +» plot a foul 
conspiracy against the life of Prospero, the Master of 
the Cell,” having first seized his books wherein lies 
his peculiar knowledge which makes him a MASTER, 
The murder was to take place at noon. He had to be 
brained and his skull battered, 


'"Tis a custom with him in the afternoon to 
sleep; then thou mayst brain him, having first 
Seized his books, or with a LoG batter his 
skull. . . ." 


What is this but a fragmentary replica of the Hiram 
Ritual Story? 


"Our Master retired to pay his adoration . . . 
as was his wonted custom at the hour of high 
twelve . . . the Ruffian demanded the secrets 
+.» the Villain was armed with a heavy Maul 

. and struck him a violent blow on the 
forehead." 


There were Three Fellows of a determined and 
atrocious character in the Ritual Story. There were 
Three “Men of Sin” in The Tempest. Both Principals 
were “Masters.” Both Masters wereto bebrained. Both 
Weré to be murdered on their retirement, Both were 
to meet their death after High Twelve. Both were to 
die by a woopen weapon, one by a Loc, the other its 
WOODEN equivalent in the Lodge. Both the Ritual and 
the play use identically the same worvp—“custom” 
—to describe the habit of both Masters; and it is 
placed in the forefront of the story in both cases, 

If Shakespeare were ignorant of the Third Degree, 

127 





Rien 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


and if this Masonic Ritual Story (quite different from 
. all Ancient Third Degree Death Rites) was not created 
until 1717-38, we have begun to tread on the skirts 
of one of the greatest miracles of coincidence- the 
world has ever known. 

The Murder of a Master! ‘Widow Dido” said 
you? "You make me study that!” Of course! 

That the Author is trying throughout to convey a 
secondary meaning is evidenced by the reiteration of 
another phrase of which he queries the meaning by 
calling it a play on words, i.e. that it carries a double 
meaning. He wants the reader to ponder it. It is a 
phrase peculiar to the Craft and so brings us nearer 
to the heart of the Speculative Mystery. In Act IV, 
$. 1, occurs this dialogue: : 


T. We steal by Line and Level. 

S. I thank thee for that jest. . . . Steal by 
"Line and Level" is'an excellent passe of pate. 
There is another Garment for it. 


In this word-play the Author draws special notice 
to the words "Line and Level" by saying that it is 
"an excellent sally of Wit (passe of pate)...” a 
jest. He then tells the reader that he has used a 
phrase which is intended to convey a double meaning, 
a secondary one. To prevent any mistake in his 
meaning he actually adds: “There is another GARMENT 
for it.” Thus we know that the phrase has been used 
as cover-words—a garment—for a finer fabric of 
thought, hidden and likely to be undiscerned. 

In what can the jest consist save in a double meaning? 
The Author was referring to the Masonic manner of 
stealing through the world by “the Line and the 
Level" unknown, unsuspected, secretly. They are 

. special symbols associated with the Second and 
Third Degrees. 

In The Tempest are references to old Masonic 

customs such as are definitely known to have taken 


128 


= = a enter ng hone Ee 


“THE TEMPEST” 


place in the Lodges of some two hundred years ago. 
To-day we have removable Tracing Boards, but in 
the old days when Lodges were often held in the 
upper rooms of Taverns, the symbols of the Degree 
were often chalked on the floor by the Tyler prior to 
the entrance of the Candidate. At the conclusion of 
the Initiation, the first duty of the newly made Brother 
was to wash out the symbols with a mop and a pai 
that they might not be discovered by outsiders. In 
the “Exposures” after 1723, some of the writers poke 
fun at the Freemasons as “The Mop and Pail Brigade.” 

Relative to this ancient custom occurs the following 
passage in Act V, s. 1: 


"It is you that have cHALKzD forth the way 
that brought us hither. . . . Oh, rejoice beyond 
a common joy and set it down with gold on 
lasting Pillars” 


In Act IV, s. 1, is the sequel: 


“Before you can say ‘Come’ and ‘Go,’ 
- + » and cry ‘So, So,’ 
Each one Tripping on his Toe 
Will be here with MOP and MOH, 
Do you Love me, master? No?” (i.e. know). 


Note.—This Song of Ariel, "Trip and Go," is to 
be found as a motif in Love’s Labours Lost: see 
“Ariel’s Way,” Chapter V. . 

These phrases would clearly stand as veiled allusions 
to practices characteristic of the eighteenth-century 
Lodges. They also stand for Lodge practices that 
must have been in existence in Shakespeare’s day. 

We have the Chalking of the Way which is not a 
“common joy” if associated with the golden Pillars 
of Masonry; the command to “come”; the command 
to “co . . .”, ie, the manner in which the Candidates 
have to "come" and "go" on entering and leaving 
the Lodge: "so .. . so. . "5 the iripping on the 

1 129 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


TOE .. . which commonly happens to the slip-shod 
Mason; and the use of a mop and pail “to clear up,” 
which is forced into the text; it is the Master of a 
Cell who directs the operations, who performs 
mysterious Rites, the Mysteries being held in caves 
originally; Chalk, moreover, is the Masonic Emblem 
for Freedom; and the Golden Pillars of Masonry are 
named Wisdom, Strength and Beauty. 

There is a further allusion to an ancient Masonic 
custom now, virtually, fallen into disuse in present-day 
Lodges. The Master then wore his Three-cornered 
Hat in the Lodge, only doffing it during prayers. 
By the side of his Chair was placed an upright sword. 
The Hat and the Sword were the ancient Masonic 
Symbols of Authority and Justice. In Act V, s. 1, 
Prospero says: 


“Fetch me the nar and Rapier in my Cell: 
I will piscasz Me.” 


Discase means to undress, to disrobe, to unclothe. 
Masons are said to be clothed when in their regalia. 
"They are unclothed or discased Masonically when they 
remove it, Shakespeare's phrase is a distinct allusion 
to an old Lodge custom. 

'The Sword and the Hat were Emblems of Office 
for which the Master was responsible. ‘Fetch them,” 
Prospero says. “Mine eyes fall rertowiy drops.” 
He is then speaking to persons outside the Cell who 
the Folio says “have entered a CIRCLE which Prospero 
had MADE." 

He says in effect, “I will unclothe myself.” He 
was dressed in his “Magic Robes” (i.e. his Masonic 
Regalia). The Lodge Symbols are to be put away. 
He returns to normal attire. Shakespeare actually 
coins a word, used only once in the Folio, that reminds 
one of the “Worthy FeLLow” preface—“FELLOWLY,” 
which had reference to persons standing in the 


130 


“THE TEMPEST” 


"CIRCLE" which “HE had made.” The Symbol of the 
Circle is again of profound Masonic significance, 

One is driven to conclude that the word “rEtLowLy” 
was used to veil the word “Brotherly” in a Masonic 
sense, since we find it allied to the Masonic Circle 
and that the entire passage refers to an ancient custom 
which had continued from the Elizabethan era until 
it emerged into the light of day after 1723. 

. We have therefore direct proof that the ancient 
customs which we know were in being, historically. 
in the latter part of the eighteenth century, were not 
created by the 1717-23 Masons, but were known to 
and practised by the Freemasons of 1623. 

In The Tempest, the Author tells a dramatic story 
to the world, but behind it are veiled secret meanings 
hidden in cunning language as in his first play, Love's 
Labours Lost. We know that the Author is "playing" 
with words and phrases" purposely and that nothing 
he writes is accidental. He writes with ‘“double’ 
meanings" and calls them "'sallies of wrr." Have we 
not already seen enough to enable us to say with Lord 
Campbell, regarding the Author's knowledge of Law, 
that when he indulges in the propensity of such 
purposeful phraseology, he lays down Goop Masonry 
in his allusions and suggestive asides? 

An examination of the play on the same lines as 
those on which we examined Love's Labours Lost 
clinches the entire position without further argument. 


“THE TEMPEST” 


Act I, ScewE 1 


THE PENALTY MARK 
He hath no drowning Mark upon him, 


THE ENTRANCE TO THE LODGE 
Stand Fast . . . to his Hanging. 
131 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE CABLE-TOW 
‘Make the Rope . . . our Cable. 


| “THE PENALTY OF YOUR OBLIGATION" 


This WIDE-CHOPT Rascal, wouldst thou 
mightest lie Drowning, the Washing of ten 
tides... 


THE BROTHERHOOD 


` Farewell . . . Brother. 


WHENCE COME YOU? 
Thou art ignorant of WHENCE 1 am! 


. THE FATHER OF FRATERNITIES 


l was Prospero, Master of a Full Poor Cell. 
~.. Thy no greater FATHER. 


AT THE PEDESTAL 


*Tis time I should inform thee farther: Lend 
`` THY HAND. 


COPY MY EXAMPLE 
Open thine ear: OBEY and be Attentive. 


THE GRAND WORSHIPFUL MASTER 


I was Prospero THE PRIME. (i.e. the First or 
the Head) reputed in dignity and for THE 
LIBERAL ARTS without a PARALLEL ... 
having both the xzy of orricer and oFFICE .. . 
all DEDICATED TO CLOSENESS. 


A STRANGER 


Mark his Condition. . . . Tell me if this 
might be a BROTHER? 


132 





“THE TEMPEST” 


ATHELSTANE, l EDWIN AND YORK 


M. I will ery it o’er again! Iv is a HINT 
That wrings my eyes to it. 


P. They hurried us aboard a Bark, . 

Bore us some leagues to sea; where they 
` prepared 

A rotten carcase of a boat, not rigged, 

Nor tackle, sail, nor mast; the very rats 

Instinctively had quit it. 


Note.—''Malone thinks that Shakespeare had in * 
his mind here, the similar treatment undergone by 
Edwin at the hands of his brother Athelstane. See 
Holinshed, 1586, Vol. I, p. 155." (Irving Ed., 
Vol. VII, p. 232, A. Symons.) 

Malone is undoubtedly right. The Author tells 
us that it is to be regarded as a "Hint," a something to 
be seen through. The “Hint” leads to something 
exceptionally important. 

- In the "Old Operative Charges” of the Masons, 
which came into being no one knows how, Edwin 
(described as Athelstane’s son, also as his brother) is 
supposed to have gone. to York and given’ to the 
operative masons their Speculative Charges in 926. 
"Edwin presided as Grandmaster,” says Preston (The 
Illustrations of F.M., p. 182). He adds that “the 
only blemish that historians can find in the reign of 
Athelstane is that he! is the supposed murderer of 
Edwin. .°. . He put him on board a leaky ship and 
he was drowned” (p. 184-7). 

The legend of the Speculative Charges of operative 
masons stops abruptly with the unhistoric gathering 
of Masons at York.. proved to be a myth by 
Findel (Hist. of F.M). 

The “Hint” masonically taken, suggests ` that 
Shakespeare was familiar with the “Cooke MS.” and 


133 















SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


the “Regius Poem” (then unknown to the world), 
which did fot see the light of day until Speculative 


been discovered, any more than the scholar that wrote 
the "Cooke MS... both of which are the only 
possible connecting links between the Modern System 
of Freemasonry and Anti uity. 

The suspiciously mysterious documents necessary 
to establish the claims of Masonry to long descent 
from “TIME IMMEMORIAL” were known apparently to 
the Author. The “Hint” can only apply to Masonry 
and to nothing else. That York, with its alleged 
historical incidents, was "urwrgp" at is much more 
probable than Malone Supposed owing to the fact 
that in Act III, s. 3, there is some further word-play: 


"My Son in the Ooze is bedded.” 

York happens to be on the River Ouse. In the Folio 
the Author prints “Ooze” with a capital “O” to indicate 
a place of the same phonetic sound. 

The “Hint” suggests that Shakespeare knew all 


134 





“THE TEMPEST” 


AuTHonry” that he cried out for in Love's Labours 


ost, 
THE DISTIN GUISHING 
CHARACTERI STIC 


A Noble Neapolitan, out of his CHARITY 


being then appointed MASTER OF THIS 
DESIGN. E 


"THAT BRIGHT MORNING STAR" 


Idepend ., . upon a most Auspicious srar. 


MASONIC QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 


Here cease more questions, 


Note.—In the Old Lodges when the Ritual was 
not being worked, Lectures were given and Masonic 


Instruction was obtained by question and answer from 
one to the other: 


“These are the usual questions, Brethren , , » 


THE POINTS OF MASONRY 


thee? 


“THE N.W. PART” 
I left him . . , 5 an Odd Angle, 


THE SUN NEVER SETS ON MASONRY 
: Thou didst call me Up at Midnight, 


CALLING OFF AND CALLING ON 
Prospero. THY CHARGE exactly is performed, 
+ . . But there’s More work... . 
What is the timz of Day? 
A. Past the Mid Season. |., 
Pro. At least Two GLASSES. . ih 
A. Is there more TOIL? 


135 


Hast thou performed to Point that I bade l 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 
-Note.—The Ancient "cuanog" has been well 


. delivered and there is to be a break for refreshment 


before resumption of “ror” as was a custom in 
prolonged meetings of the Brethren, 


RAISING TO FREEDOM 
Á. Let me remember thee what thou hast 
promised which is not yet performed me, 
- P? What is it thou canst DEMAND? 
A. My LBERTY. 
P. Before the time be out? 
A. Ihave done thee WORTHY service, ` 


THE MONTHLY RECITALS 


I must once in a monta RECOUNT (i.e, Recite) 
`= that which thou forget’st, 


TO THE INITIATE 
Do So... Discharge Thee. . . 


THE SERVING BROTHER 


We cannot miss (ie..do without) him: He 
does make our Fire, Fetch in ouz 77 OOD, and 
Serves in OFFICES that profit us, 

Note.—The Serving Brother not only looks after 
the comfort of the Brethren in the Social Degree, but 
also prepares the Lodge. He arranges the Wooden 
Implements, “our woop,” as a duty of his office. 


THE NORTH-EAST 
A South-West blow on you..., 
Note.—For the South-West to blow on the face 


of a Brother, he must necessarily be standing in the 
NORTH-EAST part of the Lodge. 


: 136 
i 








“THE TEMPEST” 


THE BEES AND BEEHIVE 
Work! All Exercise. | . . As thick as Honey- 
COMB... more... than BEES that Make 'em, 
Note.—The Beehive and Bee 
Symbols for Industry, Though 
modern Lodges, the Beehive S 
found to-day in Lodges of anci 


unknown in many 


ymbol is still to be 
ent origin, 


THE LEWIS SYMBOL 
Thou shalt have CRAMPS, 
Note.— "Certain pieces of 


: e Metal dovetailed into a 
_ Stone forming a cramp, (L 


ec. First T.B, Ritual.) 


THE SUN AND MOON SYMBOLS 
Thou didst , . 

BIGGER LiGHT and 

Day and Night. 


ACCEPTED AS A LODGE BROTHER 
I Lodged thee in mine own Cell, 


. teach me HOW to NAME the 
How the Less that burn by 


THE COCK AND DOG OF AN OLD 
RITUAL 


A. Bow wow! The Watch-dogs bark! I hear 


the strains of strutting Chantic! ae 
diddle-dow, , © cleer cry Cock-a 


F. I have followed "++ Or it hath drawn me 
rather, 


P. He hath lost his FELLOWS and st 
e FIND A OWS and strays about 


" Note.—This is a very significant touch, The word 
FELLOWS” is intended i i 


It indicates that Shakespeare was 
old Ritual found by Findel in 1866 


137 



























Q. What is a just and perfect Lodge? 


the highest hill or the lowest valley in the world, 


without the Crow of a Cock or the Bark of a Dog. 

` In The Tempest, F. is sitting in a “vALe” and hearing 

. Singing "the music in the air," follows it uphill. 
The obvious Masonic conclusion is that he is looking 
for the “Just and perfect Lodge" where he can find 
his "Fellows," his Masonic Brethren as in the old 


Ritual, 
THE PASS-WORDS 
Pro. A word, good Sir... 


Soft, Sirl One wonp more... 


This swift business I must uneasy make, lest 
too light winning, make the prize light! One 
word more. I cnaror thee that thou attend me. 

Note.—Prospero asks for three “Words” indicative 
of Three Degrees, ‘The request for the last Word, 
being the most difficult of all to communicate, is 
expressed very subtly, 





THE MASTER AND TWO WARDENS 
This is the THIRD MaNI SAW... . 


SOLOMON'S TEMPLE 


"There is nothing me can dwell in such a 


TEMPLE, 
THE TRIAL 
P. Follow me... 
M. Make not too rash a trial of him for he’s 
GENTLE (a Gentleman). . . , PII be his surety. 
P. I say, my roor my Tutor. .. . Come on! 
138 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


A. Two E.A., two F.C., and two Masters, on 








“THE TEMPEST” 
ozzy! Thy nerves are in their infancy again and 
ave no vigour in them, 
F. So they are... BOUND up.... But 
HIGHT to me might I behold. 
THE LODGE 


All corners of the earth let LtBERTY (i.e. FREE 
Masonry) make use of. Space enough have I in 
such a Prison (i.e. Prospero’s Cel] or Lodge). 


MASONRY 


P. Thou shalt be as frer as mountain winds 
but then . DO ALL POI 


NTS of my command. 
A. To the SYLLABLE, . 
*. Comel roiiow (what I say). SPEAK not 
Sor him, 


Acr II 


THE INITIATE’S CHARITY TEST 


.. If but one of his POCKETS could speak, would 
it not say, “He rres,” 


THE GLANCING B 
hat a Brow was 

If it had not fallen 
Note.—To fal] “ 


LOW AT HIRAM 

there given , . . 

FLAT-LONG. 

Flat-long” means a GLANCING blow, 
In the Ritual the First Blow 

asonic allusion in The 


MASONIC DISSIMULATION 
Surely this is 4 Sleepy I. ! i 
it thou der say? ese CLR 
his is-a Strange Repose to be asleep with 
eyes wide open! Standing, Speaking, Moving, 
139 










SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


A SIGN 
S. Thou didst swore distinctly. There's 
MEANING in thy sxonzsl j 
A. I am more serious than is my Custom. 
You must be, too, if you HEED me, which to do 
TREBLES thee over. : 

Note.—li one of the eighteenth century 
"Exposures," the writer says that if a Freemason 
enters a company and would announce himself, he 
Should cough three times . . . two loud ones and a 
little one. Antonio’s snores were in THnzzs. The 
sounds were TRzBLED Over the ears of the listener. 
Shakespeare was familiar with the Masonic manner 
of manipulating sounds as well as KNOCKS. 


“STAND PERFECTLY ERECT” 


S. Iam Standing Water. 
A. Iwill teach you how to Flow. 


Note.—There is nothing more perfectly erect than 
a perpendicular fall of water. ‘The candidate is to be 
taught how to co, to waLk . . . “to Flow.” 


A SACRED SPOT IN MASONRY 


There is 4 Space whose every CUBIT seems to 
Cry Out . . . "MEASURE us." 


. DUE SUBORDINATION 


There be he that can. nuzs as well as he that 
sleeps . . . or prates unnecessarily. 


THE SLIP-SHOD MASON 


S. But. . . your conscience? 
“A. If it were a xrpe (i.e. @ sore heel) ’twould 
put me tomy SLIPPER, 


140 





“THE TEMPEST” 


“MADE TO REPRESENT,” ETC. 


Here LIES YOUR BROTHER, no better than she 
Earth he lies upon. If he were THAT which now 
he’s like, HE 1$ prap. 
Note.—This most re 
te, markable passage exact] 
describes the most Solemn Moment in a Master 
ason’s Lodge. The profound significance behind 
these words cannot possibly be under 
unacquainted with Masonry. The Man who wrote 


it knew the Third Degree, it i 
could never oti 
have been written. , iis 


THE HAILING SIGN 


And when I rear my HAND do you the like. 
<». O, but’ onz worn. - 


A CANDIDATE FOR THE THIRD DEGREE 
They'll not Fright me with Urchin-shows (i.e. 
rcc horso play drama), pitch me in the 
IRE (Le. lay me on the Ground), nor lead me 

IN THE DARK out of : 
PALE Erud out of my way... PLL 


Note.—Every Mason will agree that this is a 


wonderful piece of camoufl f 
mon Dod age of what actually happens 


IN HIS ABSENCE AS WELL AS IN HIS 


PRESENCE 
His Forward Voice is to speak well of his 


Friend. His Backward ‘Voice is to ut 
Speeches and to Detract, iai 


THE THREE OBLIGATIONS 
G. TIl Swear to be thy true Subject. 


S. Here, Swear then. ... Here, Kiss Tur 
BOOK. ` 


141 





: SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 
S. Come Swear to that. Kiss THE BOOK. 


S. Come on then! pown and SWEAR. . 
Come xıss. 


“A PERFECT FREEDOM OF,” ETC. 

A New MASTER ... A NEW MaN... F reedom, 
High-day! High-day Freedom! Freedom High- 
day! FREEDOM. 

Note.— Masonry is razg. "That is the Key-note of 
the Speculative Craft. A Newly Made Master Mason 
is a New Man. He has obtained FREEDOM from the 
Conventional Chains which bind and snstave Men’s 
Thoughts. 


IN PROCESSIONAL ORDER 


Prithee now, Leap the Way. . . . THE KING 
and all our company. . . . 


Acrt II 
THE WORKING TOOLS 


Poor matters point to rich ends. 


Note.—“The Chisel porns out to us the advantages 
of Education,” etc. (Ritual). 


“THE SETTING SUN” 
The SUN will not SET before I shall 
Discharge what I must strive to do. 


THE SOCIAL BOARD 


Many a Time the Harmony of their Tongues 
hath unto Bondage brought my too diligent 


Ear. 
A LODGE JEWEL 


By my Modesty, the Jewel in my Dower, 
I would not wish for any better companion 
than you. 






142 





“THE TEMPEST” 
A MASON . 


Vl... be your FELLow, . 
HAND. 


THE OBLIGATION 
KNEEL AND REPEAT IT. 1 will sranp; 
So shall... Mum, then, and no more. . . , 


MASONIC ASIDES 


How now shall this be compassen , . . ? 
Thou mayst kwock. . . . 


THE THREE STEPS 


Go further off .. Prithee, Stand further 
of... . Stand further! Comel PROCEED, 


THE PENAL SIGNS 
Batter his SKULL: PAUNCH him with a Stake: 

Or cur his wzsawp with thy Knife, 
Note.—These are ve subtle, conjoined references 
relative to the Third and First Degrees . . . to strike 


the Stomach with a POINT and to cut the throat across 
the windpipe. 


eo Here's my 


ANOTHER SIGN : 
Give me thy Hann . , , I Beat thee but . . , 
Keep a coop roncus in thy Head... , 
Ay! On mine Honour. 
Note.—“The TONGUE or GooD Report,” etc, 
(Ritual. 
MASONRY IS FREE 


You taught me a while ago.. 
IS FREE, 


THE BLIND INITIATE’S THOUGHTS 


Here’s a maze trod indeed through Forth- 
Rights and Meanders. : 


Note.—"Forth-Rights"— straight paths: “Mean- 
ders"—a circling round, apparently aimlessly, 


143 


* THOUGHT 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


ENTERING THE LODGE 


Solemn and Strange Music. Master Prospero 
on the To», Invisible. (A Stage Direction in 
Folio.) ia 

Enter Several Shapes . . . 
of Salutation. 

What uarmony is this... ? 

Report this now. . . . 


with Gentle Actions 


AFTER THE CEREMONY 


I cannot too much muse . . . such GESTURES 

+ such sound expressing . . . although they 

want the use of roncuz. . . . 4 kind of Excellent 
DUMB DISCOURSE. 


Note.—The Entrance to the Lodge is taken from 


the Folio Stage Directions, altered and misplaced by 
modern editors. Prospero on the Tor—or at the To; 
of the Lodge—would naturally be invisible to a hood- 
winked candidate for Initiation. . , 

The very words, “Harmony, Salutation, Report,’ 
are particular words in constant Ritual use. ] 

The musings of the Initiate after the Ceremonial 
are the expressions exactly of the average newly made 
Brother. 


"STAND TO YOUR GLASSES, 
BRETHREN" 


Brother, My Lord the Duke! 
STAND TO and do as we... 
I will stand to... 

FEED! | 


THE THREE VILLAINS OF MASONRY 


^ You are "Three Men of Sin... most unfit to 
five... . ] 


144 


“THE TEMPEST” 


THE STEPS 
Step by Step attend. 


THE AFFLICTING INTELLIGENCE 
Why stand you in this Strange Stare? 
My Son i’ th’ Ooze is bedded. I will szex 
him deeper than e'er PLUMMET sounded and 
with him there lie mudded. 7 


THE PURSUIT 
All THREE of them are desperate. Their great 
Guilt like Poison given to work a great time 
afterwards . . . roriow THEM SWIFTLY, 


- Acr IV 


“THIS TRIAL WAS NOT MADE TO 
SPORT,” ETC. 
All thy vexations were but TRIALS of thy Love, 
and thou hast strangely STOOD THE TEST. 


Here afore Heaven, 7 Ratify this... RICH 
GIFT, 


THE TEMPLE: OF MASONRY | 
The Solemn Temples shall dissolve, , os 
Like this insubstantial pageant. 

Note.—It shall fade “like the Pageant” of a Solemn 
Masonic Ceremonial which passes into the Yesterday 
of Dreams... and Memories. This complete 
passage—one of the most beautiful in literature—was 
inspired and modelled round the thought of one of 
the old Elizabethan Masonic Ceremonials. 


THE TYLER TO THE CANDIDATE 

' — Be Patient. . . , The Prize I bring thee to 
*  * (Dshall noopwrsk thee, . . Speak softly 
- * - This is the Mouth of the Celll No Noise! 
ENTER, 


Er 145 














SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


LIGHT 


O King ... O Peer... O wortny. . . 
Look what a WARDROBE is HERE. . . . 
Note.—This exactly expresses the surprise of the 
Initiate after the "Blessing of Light" has been 
"restored to him," and he sees the richly clothed 
Brethren in their varied Regalia and Jewels. 


Acr V 
MASONIC CLOTHING 


Prospero in his Magic nons. 


THE CIRCLE 


They all enter the crrcte which Prospero had 
made and there srann, He Speaks . .. 


THE EMBLEMS OF MORTALITY 


A Solemn ayre and the best Comforter to an 
unsettled Fancie Cure Tuy Brains . . . Bore 
within THY SKULL . . . STAND . . . YOU are 
Spell-stopt. 

Note.—To interpret this passage, the emphasis 
must be placed on the word "ruv," nor can it then 
be understood (Shakespearian scholars confess them- 
selvesin the dark as to the meaning) except Masonically. 

The persons in the CIRCLE are looking at a SKULL, 
devoid of brains that.can be Agitated as theirs are by 
being confronted with the sxuzz and CROSS-BONES. 

Shakespeare applies the Emblems of Mortality with 
the same individual meaning that Masons do to-day. 

Notice that in the THIRD DEGREE a SOLEMN AYRE is 
played in this Degree according to Shakespeare. 
There is a tendency in many modern Lodges. to cut 
out the solemn music of the Lodge. It is to be 
regretted: Such “cutting” is not consonant with 

146 








“THE TEMPEST” 


ancient Elizabethan practice according to the FOUNDER 


Shakespeare. 
“THERE IN A GRAVE se 


Bury rr certain FATHOMs in the Earth 
Deeper than did ever Plummet Sound. . . , 


"DROP A TEAR OF SYMPATHY" 
Mine Eyes fall rettowzy Drops, 


“HEARTY GREETINGS” 

To Thee and to thy company, I bid a uzarty 
WELCOME. . . . This cell is my Court. Here 
have I few attendants and Subjects none 
abroad... ^ 


ALL THE BLESSINGS of a Glad FATHER COMPASS 
Thee about. . . , 


. You have cHALKrD forth the way. . 
it down with Gold on Lasting PILLARS. 


THE SQUARE PAVEMENT 


The Cell opens . . . and discovers (they are) 
Playing at Chess, 


Note.—According to Prof. Allen, Naples (the 
ss-playing in 

the Author’s day. The introduction of a Chess-Board 
is very significant, Miasonically. It represented the 
"BLACK AND WHITE SQUARE PAVEMENT of the Masonic 


+ SET 


SPECULATIVE FREEMASONRY 


This is as Strange a Maze as e'er Man Trod. 

A And there is in this business more than Nature 
Was ever conduct of: Some oRACLE 

W.M. [Mast Rectify our Knowledge. 


147 


' SHAKESPEARE, ‘CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Note.—The “Oracle” that can rectify thé Author's 
knowledge and declare his meaning to the Reader is 
“A W.M.” because only a Worshipful Master, familiar 
with Speculative Masonry, can: possibly understand 
the allusions, asides and double meanings of his 
literary craftsmanship. 

“As strange a Maze,” etc., is an echo of the Ritual 
. + + “NATURE . . . when she has conpuctep you 
through these Intricate Windings . . .,” etc, 









THE APRON AND SASH OF THE 
ROYAL ARCH 
Mark but the sapors of these Men, my 
.Lords . . 


Go to my Cell. ... Take with you your 
COMPANIONS. ... 


Every THIRD THOUGHT shall be my GRAVE. 


Note.—Because every Mason’s Third Thoughts 
are Third Degree Thoughts and are associated with 
DEATH and the Grave. 


THE CHAPTER: ROYAL ARCH 
“WE THREE DO MEET AND AGREE” 
© I will deliver all . . . tuar (i.e. every Third 
Thought) is ray CHARGE. . . . 
BE FREE. 
. Please you pRAW NEAR. . . . 
SET ME FREE, 


In this last request of the Author, “ser ME FREE,” 
there is a hint of the tragedy of which he was an 
innocent victim. To pursue this is quite outside my 
scope; but Freemasons should remember that there 
is a “soMETHING” connected with the Founder's Life 
which can only be cleared up by the ministration of 
his friends—“the BRETHREN” in particular—in future 


148 





“THE TEMPEST” 


Ages. He leaves the matter to them when the truth : 
becomes known. 


, “I will speak of him as well in his absence as 
in his presence, and boldly repell the slanderer 
of his coop namr.” (The Ritual.) 

“He that robs me of my GooD NAME... 
leaves me voor indeed,” (Shakespeare.) 

“As you from Crimes would pardoned be, 

Let your Indulgence ser mz Fru,” 


These are Shakespeare’s Last Words in The Tempest. 


They are a Petition and a Prayer, 
“Set me FREE,” he asks, from the cruel verdicts and 
“harsh judgments of prejudiced men, from the Brand 
of Cain, the marx which “Vulgar Scandal stamped 
upon my snow." (The “Sonnets,” CXH—-146.) 
Rest assured of this: There was more than one 
ragedy in his life: these were the things which 
helped to make him into a CONCEALED MAN, 


149, 


VII 
THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


"I likewise will visit thee with mine LETTERS. viu 

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA, ACT 1, 8. 1. 
“Peruse that nerrer,... WRITE FROM IT... if 
jou CAN” TWELFTH NIGHT, ACT V, S. I. 
“And from the Cross Row (i.e. the Rosicrosse) plucks the 
LETTER G ” (i.e, the Grand Geometrician). 
RICHARD III, ACT I, S. I. 


N the previous chapter it has been observed that 
I in the Shakespearian text there are definite proofs 

of design in the use of Capital Letters— particu- 
larly Initial Letters and Words—which unmistakably 
suggest that the Author knew the Masonic Letter 
Codein use to-day among Masons—such as “A W. M. 
to designate “A Worshipful Master,” etc. This 
Particular Code-knowledge of which examples have 
been given has been noted in Love’s Labours Lost 
and The Tempest, but it will be found that the Author 
scatters this form of secret writing throughout the 
whole of the plays according to his humour. 

In the two Masonic ones the Capital Letter Code 
tuns throughout, systematically, from the first line 
to the last. Similarly in "Shakespeare's Sonnets"— 
Which was the Author's personal diary—the code runs 
through the entire body of verse, one hundred and 
fifty-four Sonnets, the Capital Letters being employed 
to explain in concrete terms the imaginative, enig- 
matical utterances of the Poet. ‘These messages prove 
that William Shakespeare’s passion for the Royal Art, 


150 
























THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


the Ethical System, was a dominant one, an incalculable 
factor of supreme importance in his Life and ART. It 
enabled him to pass through the world jn umbra. It 
accounts for much of the mysteriousness which veils 
him from us, especially the enigma of his personality 
which perplexes even scholarly students, 

At the present time, unfortunately, literary men 
reject-the idea that Elizabethan writers ever used any' 
form of Anagram, Code or Cypher in their work— . 
especially in the Shakespearian text. “Itis impossible,” 
say they, “that Shakespeare, after writing a magnificent 
piece of blank verse or a wonderful Sonnet, hot from 
the throes of labour, could possibly have begun to 
pull his new creation about, twisting it, altering. it, 
beating it... simply to write in a meaningless bit 
of gossip, the structural beauty being SIMPLICITY, not 

omplexity.” 

This argument sounds very well in the mouths of 
twentieth-century writers in our present mechanical 
age, but such disparagement does not affect this truth: 
that the Elizabethans, whether we like it or not, did 
resort to such devices and that such efforts as an ART- 
FORM demand literary craftsmanship of the highest 
order. It is a height quite beyond the reach of the 
current frec-verse Modernist who refuses to shackle 
himself with metre, feet, rhyme, rhythm, rules, as 
being much too old fashioned, The fact is that definite 
rules impose a test of skill on any would-be poet. The 


` more they are to be observed, the more ingenuity 


must be displayed by the craftsman. Add to these 
rules, the art of writing so that the words drop in a 
certain definite order, that new words may be formed 
according to rule, and it is at once evident that only 
a Master of Words could use such complex rules with 
freedom—especially when such craftsmanship con- 
veyed the air of artful simplicity. 

No poet has been born since Shakespeare who could 
write the “Simple Language of the Sonnets.” Each 


151 








“SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


one is like.a woven piece of tapestry in which the warp 
and weft of the poet’s language trace out a hidden 
design vertically and horizontally . . . a series of 
designs which give the concrete Morir of the Poet’s 
Passion. "The world has yet to marvel at the Loom on 
which the Shakespeare Sonnet was born, the minp of 
the man who could think during its construction on 
several planes of thought at one and the same time, 
Creating a Diversity in Unity. : 

It is sheer folly for literary critics to aver that 
Shakespeare never pulled a Sonnet about, or rewrote 
a passage in blank verse, and that poetry is not created 
in such a fashion. The fact is that no one knows H OW 
he wrote the Sonnets and no one ever will know. The 


Squires and Sitwells of to-day may write their verse 


with a hop, skip and a jump, but that does not prove 
that Shakespeare never wrote and re-wrote. There is 
solid evidence that he revised considerably. He altered 
the two Sonnets in the “Passionate Pilgrim” that 
afterwards appeared in the Quarto numbered “1609.” 
He almost transmogrified some of the Quarto Plays 
when they were placed, finally revised, in the 1623 
Folio. He knew the truth so bluntly expressed by 
Sheridan, “Easy writing’s damned hard reading |" 
It most certainly isl 

` We cannot judge the fashions of another age by 
our own. Because we do not indulge in the habit of 
enfolding secrets in our verse—and think it silly so 
to do—we have no right to infer that the old 
Elizabethans' did not indulge themselves in this 
practice. 


"The author who decides on the tastes of 
another age by those of his own day, and whose 
knowledge of the waTroNAL literature does not 
extend beyond his own country, is neither 
Historian nor Critic. 

“The truth-is that ANAGRAMS were then (in 


152 








This ornament was placed at the Head of the "1609 Sonnet Quarto," and isaspeci- 
men of Rosicrosse Symbolism. The light A and dark A design is one of a family of 
headpieces (fourtcen in all) peculiar to books with which the Rosicrosse Literary Society 
had some connection, especially in the latter part of the sixteenth and early seventeenth 
centuries. The same blocks were used by printers far apart and were supplied by a 
central organization. 

The light and dark shading of the “A A's" car-marked the book as one that 
contains in the shadow more than is openly revealed. ‘They are designed in the form 
of ladders or a winding staircase . .. a Masonic Symbol. 

"The centre ornament is an URN which, cmblematically, contains the ashes of a dead 


` personality. Underneath the Urn is the Shuttle of ‘Time supported bya partially un- 


wound skein... the thread of Fate. A Key on the point of entering the lock completes 
the base . . . indicating that with this Sonnet Key Shakespeare unlocks his heart. 
The Urn supports a basket vase which holds Floral Emblems. On the right-hand side 
is a Palm Branch. The Mystical Palm at once associates itself with Solomon's 


‘Temple : ** Upon each post were palm trees... palms to the Arches... and palms to 
the Seven Steps.’” 


On cither side of the Urn is a single leaf or fleur-de-lis of purity... a Rosicrucian 
emblem. 


On the bottom right appears a very clearly marked scroll "I", emblematic of the 
"Sacred Word?! known to Royal Arch Companions. 


Prate IX 
(See page 193) 





om re 





[7 


i 


“SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS” 
‘Tue Last Sonnet in ‘tHE “1609 Quarto” 





Y utl a | 
Sonne 


M 


TS 
1 
little Loue-God lyingónte afleepe, WE abet 
Laidby his fide his heart inflaming brand, 
Whilft many Nymphes that you'd chaft life to keep. 
Came tripping by,but in hermatden hand, 
The fayreftyotary tooke yp that fire, 
Which many Legionsoftrue heartshad. watmd, 
And fo the General of hot defire, 
Was fleeping by a Virginhand difarm’d. 
This brand the quenched in'a coole Well by, 
Which from loucs fire tooke heat perpetual, 
Growing a bath andhealthfull remedy, 
Formen difeafd,but I my Mifiriffe thrall, 
Came there for cure and this by that I proue, 
Louesfireheates water water cooles not loue. 


xA SUM NN BW && BS 


Ero 
VIVA Bl wy 





K A? 





np 
2 277 


From Secret Shakespearian Seals. 


‘The seal mark of 287 is shown in two places quite clearly. One of the sly methods 
of the Rosicrosse is seen in the use of the large Capitals "rivis x A," to indicate 
a clue to the Sonnet Riddle. In Tudor times "Key' was prenounced "xav," and 
to spell backwards was a favourite trick. Tf these letters be spelled backwards we 
get the vital sentence that A Kay (Le. a xzy) s ix r.” The Key referred to that 
is “rn” the Sonnets is, among other things, a Masonic one, for “P” stands for 
Freemasonry. Numerically, “r” stands for Five, and this number playsan important 
part in the rearranging of the Sonnets into their correct original order. 


Prae X 


“THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


the Elizabethan Era) the fashionable amusements 
of the Wittiest and the most Learned. . . «: 
“There came also two Anagrams to my hands 
not unworthy to be owned by the Rarest Wits of 
this age, wrote D'Ewes. : 
“The Anagram may contain some allusion to 
an event,” etc. 


So wrote I. D'Israeli in Curiosities of Literature 
(p. 257), and added that "Acrostics, Anagrams and 
Echo Verses may be shown capable of reflecting the 
ingenuity of their writers," He also says: 

"I have seen some of the latter Acrostics 
where, both sides and cross ways, the NAME. . . 
has been sent down to Posterity with eternal 
‘torture. One name is made out four times, . . . 

“Great difficulty must have been experienced 
to find words by which the LETTERS forming 
the name should be forced to stand in their particular 
places” (p. 107). 

This literary antiquarian, judging by his famous 
book, was a Rosicrosse-Mason and familiar with the 
prime Secret of Freemasonry in the Elizabethan era. 

The secrets contained in the judicious though 
arbitrary use of CAPITAL LETTERS are very cleverly told 
by the celebrated essayist Joseph Addison, familiar 
with Freemasonry and apparently well acquainted with 
Rosicrosse methods of conveying Masonic asides on 
the printed page. He writes: 

“TI shall Discourse upon those Single caprrat 

LETTERS . . . which have afforded great Matter 
of Speculation to the Curious. . . . 
` “I would not have my reader surprised if, 
hereafter, he sees some of my papers marked 
with a Q, a Z, a Y, an etc, or with the word 
Abracadabra. . . . 

“T shall so far explain myself . . . the LETTERS 
C, L, X, are canALisTIC and carry in them more 


153 























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


than is proper Jor the World to be acquainted 
with... , 


THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


Service, by Kings and Queens to protect their privaciest 
—for "every Prince then had his Cypher"- but that 





“A Divine... Chaplain to the Earl of literary men were similarly infected by the use of 
Essexin Queen Elizabeth’s time, had an admirable : Cyphers, etc., in those days. 
head for SECRETS OF THIS NATURE. . . . It is not, however, sufficient to assume that Shake- 

“There may be a great deal of fine writing in Speare uses a Letter Code simply because it was a 
the CAPITAL LETTERS... But for the prevalent practice in his era, Nothing less than. his 
full explication of these matters, I Must REFER own authority can justify the student in reading a 
THEM TO TIME WHICH DISCOVERS ALL THINGS, Special significance into the use of his Initial Capital 
(Vol. III, p. 103.) Letters. “This authority he actually gives to the 


discerning reader. “He not only writes in Act IV, s. 3, 
“Spend a minute’s time in PRUNING me, if you would 
understand me,” which pruning has led to the unearth- 
ing of a mass of pure Masonic Imagery, but he also 
specially directs our attention to something else— 
the “Lerrer-cope” itself. 


It is not without Significance that Addison so 
pointedly refers to the use of Capitals for conveying 
esoteric knowledge, associating it with the Elizabethan 
era in the Person of Robert, Earl of Essex, for every 


“It comes so SMOOTHLY off .. . soir, , , 
HIS PAGE AT OTHER SIDE, that Handful of Wit... 
Ah Heavens! It is wir (i.e. Knit)! sowral 
Sowla!” (Love's. Labours Lost, Act IV, s. r. 
See 1623 Folio, P- 131 for the correct words.) 


That which was xwir together was the String of 
Capitals on the other side of the page, which begin 
each line, the left-hand side * * for the eyes finish 
reading on the right. They were to be read vertically 
down or up, Chinese fashion. “Fit the Letters, the 
Capitals,” he says in effect. “They read smoothly, 


‘had a very serious effect on the character of the plays 
written after the Earl’s execution. In short, Addison’s 
remarks seem to imply that he had in his mind 
Shakespeare's Art in the use of Capital Letters when 
referring to the Essex era. In any case, Addison 
recognised that “secrets” which were “CABALISTIC” 


openly expressed by a Code of Capitals which was 
known only to the “Initiated” and which “carried in 
them more than is proper for the world to be acquainted 





with.” * * * They are small gems of wir.” The last words 

In view of the testimony of two such literary are addressed to one of the Brotherhood—“s,o,w.ta,” 
witnesses as Bros. D’Israeli and Addison as to the In those days a Member of the Fraternity was known 
use of such methods in the spacious days of : as a "Son Of Wisdom," and since the play is cast in 
the “Virgin Queen,” is it not sheer presumptuous France the last Syllable “La” means “there.” “Tt is 
ignorance for any modern critic to assert that these Knit, Son of Wisdom, THERE . . | on the other side 
Rosicrosse-Masonic methods of dissimulation were 1 Note—It is not generally known that the members of our own 
not employed by “our Ancient Brethren”? Though Royal Household correspond with each other by a Code of Letters 
we may dislike the practice, we must accept the fact - . etc., known only to themselves in order that the privacy of familiarity 
that "Codes" were in use not only by the State Secret may be assured between them, 


154 : 155 





RAT Dess. 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


of the page... a handful. of wrr in the Capitals | 


that tell the truths of Masonry,’ 

We. have already seen that these Capitals do indeed 
ollow one another as in the “Oracle” and “Hamlet? 
and “Boas” illustrations, We now know that the 
Author was doing all this deliberately. - That these 
"Handfuls of Wit” Were part and parcel of his 
wonderful literary ctaftsmanship, that there were 
Masonic Asides in many cases interpretative of the 
Open text, : 

This consciously’ cunning form of writing is told 
by Shakespeare even more precisely in the Sonnets, 
for these were truly his personal utterances. In 
Sonnet 1 (xxn) he writes: 

“LEARN TO READ what Silent Love hath writ... 
TO HEAR wirH (Your) zyzs, , , ." 


Everyone knows’ that we cannot “Hear with our 
Eyes,” and that to have read the Sonnet the reader 
must have already “Learned to Read” in an ordinary 
manner, It is therefore obvious that the Poet is 
directing the student to read in an EXTRAORDINARY 


of Love (Masonic Charity, etc.) may be heard as in 


a music score to a trained musician. In short, the’ 


Poet is Saying in imaginative language: “Look at 
what you have read z Second Time... . See whether 
you can find the Code I employ. . . . Read what I 
have writ in silently and secretly... usE your nyzs,” 
In Sonnet 68 (1xxv1) the -Sonneteer advances the 
Position a step farther, “Ee says: 
“Every Word doth almost FELL my NAME." 


From the Masonic-Code viewpoint, the word 
“FELL” is the most important word in the Quarto. 
“Fell” means “to finish as in weaving; the'end of 


the web formed by the last thread of the weft in a. 


Piece of fabric in the Process of weaving.” Shake- 
156 





THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


Speare thus intimates that he has woven his name in 
some way in the fabric of the open text. The reason why 
he has woven his name by anagram in such a manher 
is because in the Previous line he has written: 


“I Keep INVENTION in à NorED wzzp," 
"Invention" was the Elizabethan term for Poetry, 


“WEED” was a term used to signify a “DISGUISE,” 
something behind which one could hide one’s face, 


hence the phrase, ‘A Widow's wrens.” Shakespeare 


Passion are aflame with the highest ideas of the Great 
Architect of the Universe, the Brotherhood of Man, 
e New Commandment, “That ye Love one another,” 
That is one of the prime secrets of the Immortal Bard, 
‘he Author, however, takes the matter a step 
further. He says that every Word not only Fells his 
Name, but that his Words 


"Show their sirry and WHERE they did 
Proceed,” 


We thus know that the coucrete motif which brought 
such “worps” into being, “WHERE they proceeded to 
and from,” the various Passions that stirred him into 
emotional activity, are felled and seamed in his utterances, 
He clinches the truth that he employs a Letter-Code in 
the open text by the avowal in the last lines: 


“So all my BEST (Work) is DRESSING OLD 
WORDS (into) NEW (ones), Spending again 
what is already Spent, 

This unequivocal Statement intimates that the 
writer has used all his ingenuity in arranging the 


157 














Po oo i ss iE 


1 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


words in his verse—his Dramatic as well as his 
Lyrical—in such a way that out of them (the oLD 
ones) NEW wonps could be formed, and thus “spenp 
AGAIN (ie. spend again the letters used in the Old 
Words) wuar is already Spent.” 

We are thus driven, by pure literary analysis, to 
accept the conclusion that Shakespeare uses at least 
one Code method which consists in the manipula- 
tion of Letters and Words to give a new meaning. 
This is clinched by the fact that he indicates that he 
can "coc" with Words and Letters like sharpers can 
with dice—vo make them fall in a given manner (see 
Chapter V, “Masonic Speech"). 

The definite rules by which this “Cogging” and 
“Felling” is done, etc., cannot very well be given 
in an unpretentious work such as this. Enough has 
been siithared to show the literary craftsmanship 
necessary to perform such work successfully. If we 
put the little Truth we know into operation—by 
examining the plays and poems—readers will be 
surprised how the ‘Truth of such "Cogging" and 
“Felling” will demonstrate itself. ‘The following 
illustrations are quite definitely Masonic and will be 
recognised as such the world over. 


“THE TEMPEST” 
Act I, s. 2, ]. 15. 


THE MASON 


INL oss 
In IN I. 


(This line is cut out by brackets: 
. See Folio) 
Art Art ignorant . . . 
Of whence I am, nor than I am 
more better 
TO Than Prospero, Master of a full, 
poor cell, 


158 


To 





D 


THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


A A. And shy xo greater Father, 
Mason M More to know. 


TO A MASON IN ART, 


FOUNDER AND FATHER  L.66. 


The T 
Worshipful W 
Master wm. (M 
I I-- 
Be Be... 
Of all Ofal... 
The Masons The Ma... 
T T > 
And Prince apr. And Pr... the prime . . reputed 


Inspector In In dignity and for the Lisznar 
ARTS 

Worshipful w. Without a parallel . . 

The The 

THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER I BE OF ALL THE ‘MASONS; 
THE WORSHIPFUL INSPECTOR AND PRINCE T . . 


THE THIRD MAN L. 442. 
A A word good Sir. 
J 
Junior Warden mS Why . . . this 
Is Is the third man .., I saw... 


That That : 
To blind Initiates. 'Tob...1.... 


A JUNIOR WARDEN IS THAT TO BLIND INITIATES, 


THE THIRD DEGREE L. 466. 
Oo O dear Father 
Most M 
High H 
O MOST HIGH. 
159 




















SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR. OF FREEMASONRY 
THE INNER GUARD L. 458. 


The The There's Nothing ill can dwell in 
such a Temple 
. If the ill spirit have so fair a 
Inner |^ 4 House 
Guard LG. {oe things will strive to dwell 


with't. Follow me? (i.e. “do 
you follow what I mean?") 


Is IS I 
Se 
Set sit |T 
Worshipful WwW 
Installed ' I 
Master M 


THE INNER GUARD IS SET 
WORSHIPFUL INSTALLED MASTER, 


“THE THREE PILLARS” 
Act V, s. 1, I. 202. 


A A 
Freemason —— For it is you that have chalked 
forth the way 
Worthy w.F. (Which brought us hither . . . 
I Tsay A...G... (ie. “Great 
Architect"). 
Wisdom : W 
Strength S... O rejoice 
Beauty B. Beyond a common joy and set it 
down 
With With gold on lasting PiLLARs: 
f Ion. 
(Ionic) 
D 


0... 
(Doric... Corinthian) 
A WORTHY FREEMASON I: WISDOM STRENGTH BEAUTY 
WITH IONIC DORIC CORINTHIAN, 
160 





THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


Note that the C pitals which follow the "W.S.B." 
are “I... D... C. - -” and are all associated 
With the "PriLARS" in the text according to the Ritual. 
“But as we have no noble orders of architecture known 
by the names of Wisdom, Strength and Beauty, we 
refer them to the three most celebrated which are the 
Tonic, Doric and Corinthian.” 


A MASONIC KNIGHT 
Act I, s. 2, 1. 158. 


A A 
High H 
Brother B 


AS Som... 
N ien ear 
o 

M 


Out of his cuarrty , 


Mason Master of this pesten . . . 
R 
Right Worthy W 
Knight r.w.xn. | Kn 
From From .. 
Jerusalem J 


^ HIGH BROTHER: MASON: RIGHT WORTHY KNIGHT 
FROM JERUSALEM 
Note.— The word “Mason” is also spelled by the 
position of the letters in lines 4 and 5$: “Som .. Å N” 
(an anagram), ; 


A FELLOW CRAFT’S KNOWLEDGE L.177. 


Know Know thus far forth: 
By By accident most strange . 
Now Now... 
Boas B. Brought to this Shore . . . 
: Ifünd.. 
| Jachin JA. |A most auspicious Star (i.e. 


"The Blazing Star”). 
KNOW BY NOW, BOAS JACHIN, 
L 161 























[ 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 
THE LODGE RECITALS L.2 59. 


Know No... 
The Th ... Speak: Tell mel 
Solemn S 

Obligations s.o. {8 Imus 


Once in a month recount . . 
Worthy wo. (Which thou forget'st . . . 
Freemason r. Fr. M... : 


KNOW THE SOLEMN OBLIGATIONS, WORTHY FREEMASON: 


MAKING A MASON L. 468. 
The Worshipful Wess 
Master w.M. | My Foot my Tutor . .. 


Who Who mak'sta . . . - 
Initiates I 
Freemason F 

A 


THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER INITIATES A FREEMASON. 


POOR AND PENNILESS 


Act I], s.1, l. 65. 
Nota Bene N 
(Take Notice) n.e. | B 


A 
At ' AT T 
Initiation I. If one of his rocxzrs could 
speak would it not say, “He 

ies!” 


Installed I (“T in Folio, not “Ay.”) 
Master IM. |M i 


The T 
TAKE NOTICE: THE INSTALLED MASTER AT INITIATION. 


Note.—This exactly describes the incident that takes 
place at the initiation of every candidate, 


162 





THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


THE WORD L. 96. 
Sir... st Tunis . . . your 
daughter . . . Queen, 
AS And the rarest . . 
{ J Bate . . . widdow Dido. 
BO-AS BO O Widdow Dido? I, Widdow 
Dido. 
Is i Is... 
The Th... 
Word. Wi e eOr anid ena 
!BOAS IS THE WORD, 
THE ROYAL ARCH JEWEL L. 48. 
On 
; son |S 
M 
Mason f MA |A 
Jewel J 
he The Jewel in my dower . . 


A Companion A Companion |. . vou . . . 
A COMPANION! THE JEWEL! MASON. 


THE LECTURE 
Act III, s. 2, 1. 48. 


As I told thee before . . . 
At AT is 
The T 
T ... if you trouble him any 
Tracing { more in ’s tale, 
Board. T.B. ( By this uauxp I will... 


AT THE TRACING BOARD (Folio, p. 12, col. 1). 


A HIGH DEGREE L. 112. 
Installed — . I 
Master (or Most) M 
163 























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 
Excellent 


Excellent 
Grand Give me thy Hand. 
Worshipful W 
I I : 
Is. . WORSHIPFUL GRAND EXCELLENT MASTER 
: INSTALLED, 


THE HEAD OF THE CRAFT 


Act III, s. 5, 1. 17. 


What Harmony is this? 
Master W.M. | Marvellous . ; . 


Grand G. Give us Kind Keepers . 
THE GRAND WORSHIPFUL MASTER. 


Worshipful 


A “T.T.” LAY: THE DEATH DEGREE . 


Act IV, s. 1,1. It. 
A And like the baseless fabric of 

' this Vision, 
The Cloud-capt Towers . , . 
T.T. Tis Solemn TEMPLES . . (i.e. 
Solomon's Temple) 


Yea all which it inherit shall 
` dissolve, 
And like this 
PAGEANT faded 
Leave not a rack behind. We 
are such stuff 


R Dreams are made on, and 


TT: » 


insubstantial 
Lay 


our little life 
Is rounded by a sleep 
Bear with my weakness: 
old brain is troubled . . 
Be not disturbed . . . 
If . . . Retire into my Cell. 
A 


Jachin ja. 
Boas : B. 


Bif 
L a 


My 


ABif 
164 


Meme e 


«143. 
L 
I 
Will wi (|W 
Is . i fI 
S 


A 
Fellow Craft rc. 






THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 






The T 
Worthy W. — We wish you Peace , 
Compasses Com... 
Solomon's : Tli 
Temple sr, 1S; T 
I I my commanper . . . 
Say Say... 
A “Der” Lay: 





JACHIN, Boas: 
COMPASSES SOLOMON’S ‘rx; 






THE WORTHY 'ABIF 
MPLE, I SAY, 







LOVE'S LABOURS LOST 
3 Act I, s. 2, ]. 132. 


THE LODGE 


S 
t. I 
"Mrs [M 
IT 












I will visit thee at the LODGE 
That is hereby 


. I know where it is situate 
I MISS IT. 






“WILL” THE FELLOW CRAFT L 







And so farewell 







F 
{Gome Jaquen... 1 
WILL IS A FELLOW CRAFT: CoME “Jaguzn,” 
|: (i.e. "Jachin," phonetic). 
165 













t è : rm D > (T 1 i } i IE 


omer f i 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE THREE JEWELS 
Act Il, s. 1, 1. 179. 

The 
Square 
The 
Level 
Plumb-rule 
Jewel 
Jewel 
Jewel 


++. do my commendations, 


On ny 


THE SQUARE, THE LEVEL, PLUMB-RULE: JEWELS. 
Note.—rHE three “Ps” follow each other in the 
Folio printing order, 


WHO WAS THE MAN THAT WAS “W.M.” ? 
; L. 184. 


S 

A 
was | W 

M 
w.M. 1W 


WORSHIPFUL MASTER was 1. 


| "SAM'S SON" 


Act IV, s. 3» l. 240. 
To To 
S 
SAM 4 A 
Sam M 
Brother B . . . doth varnish Age, as if 
. new born . Vs 
A A 
166 

































THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 
O, tis the Sun that maketh all 
things shine, 
BO. 


BO. y heaven, thy love is black as 
ebony. 


J... Ebony! OQ woop 
J Divine . 
Ja (A 


TO SAM: A BROTHER: p 
Note.—“Sam” 






JA. 





O: .JA. 


isa contraction for “Sam’s Son,” 
the Phrase used for “Solomon's Son’? between the 
Elizabethan Masons, 


“Bo,” “Ja” contraction for 
Boaz, Jachin. 


In the Mysteries, 
Black, 









one Pillar was White and one T 


! 
THE BUILDERS 2 D ` 
Act V, s, 2, l. 130. 
Hiram S Hold ...this, BA 
Abif . g4 A... then the King 
Hiram, 


H... take this... t., | to) 
Solomon. So 


i 
1 
| 


SOLOMON, HIRAM, HIRAM ABIF. 


HIRAM THE ARCHITECT L., 406. 
T 


The 

Third Principal ThreeP ..,.. 
(F 

Ha HA Ha. 
I 

BIF BIF, l5 this white glove . 
H 
Ir 
A 

HIrAM M 


THE THIRD PRINCIPAL: HIRAM(H)ABIF, 


167 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


A SYMBOL OF THE CRAFT 
Act I, s. 1, 1, 84. 


Why Why should I Joy in an abortive 
birth? I ; 
A A 
Tracing T 
Board. TB |B I 
Solomon's So you . study... 
Temple — sr, That were to cump o'er the 
HOUSE to unlock 75e Jj, 
Gate. 
A 
At ^T. (Then for that Angel Knowledge, 


WHY A TRACING BOARD AT SOLOMON's TEMPLE, 


Note.—Masons are su posed to cir» the Ladder 
of Masonic Knowledge. The “House” referred to in 
the text was, of course, “Solomon’s House” used 
interchangeably for “Solomon's Temple” or the 
Lodge in the Elizabethan era. “The little Gate” is in 
every Lodge Door to Spy strangers. - 


“AND WAT MOT YT BE" 
Act II, s. 1, 1. r. 


Now M... (i.e. Mason) 


Nem Con. N.c. | Consider 


(Unanimously) To whom he sends and what's 
his embassy: 
YT (ie. rr) yr 
T 
o 
Mot (Mote) wor, [o 


168 








THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


T 
-BE Be... 
A 


WAT { war. (W 
AND AndP.. G... T. .al 
. (A Parting Greeting to All.) 
AND WHAT MOTE IT BE: NEM CON: A PARTING GREETING 
TO ALL. 


Note.—Thete is the touch of the “Regius Poem” 
in this phonetically archaic spelling . . . *Wat Mot 
Yt Be." This phrase, whose origin has long puzzled 
scholars, is also to be found most cunningly given in 
the same play in the passage "Not a word . . , ‘go? 
itis... UT" May be ‘SO’ . -. BETOME., .” 
etc. (See Folio, P. 124, col. 1, 1. 5.) The “rrom” 
spelled backwards gives “MOTE,” the other letters 
“BE,” the “rr” and the “so” give the complete phrase: 
“So Mote it Be.” š 


A LODGE INCIDENT L. 25, 
The 


The 
Tracing B 
Board TB. |T 
Í Bold of your worrutnass 
A 


Tell him . 

Baton BaTon ( On serious business . . . 
Importunes . . . with 

Hil HI. {me Sue 

Lecture. L... his High Will, 

Past Officer p.or, Stond of Employment willingly 

o. 
-A A^ P ] 


“A PAST OFFICER'S LECTURE: "gil THE TRACING 
BOARD BATON,” 


169 






































Y 
SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Note.—All Masons know what a characteristic 
- little incident this is in the Lodge: a flurried P.M, 
calling for the “Pointer.” 


THE DIVINE MIND 
Act IV, s. 2, 1. 43. 


The T. Tistrue .. 
Great God comfort thy capacity. The 
allusion holds in the Exchange. 
Architect c.a, E 


THE GREAT ARCHITECT. 


THE HEAD OF THE ORDER 
(See Folio, p. 131, col. 2, l. 65 for the Initials.) 


T xs 
It IT [ris is a gift I have . 
I Praise the Lord for you . 
Is : IS S 
Grand G 
Master G.M. |Master . . 
Worshipful WwW 
M 
Most Mo. |O 


IT IS THE MOST WORSHIPFUL GRAND MASTER. 


Note.— There has been much learned discussion 
whether there was a Grand Master prior to the 
“Emergence” in 1717. We now know definitely that 
William Shakespeare was the Head of the Fraternity 
and that he was the Grand Master... Prospero 
the Prime. i 


THE I.P.M. JEWEL 
Att V, s. 1, 1. 453. 
Your You gave me this . 
i 170 





THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


Immediate My faith... 
Past I knew h.. by this yews, . . . 
Master 1pm. | P... this JEWEL did he wear.. 
N 
I 
Know... 


Knight Knit (Too... 
A KNIGHT YOUR IMMEDIATE PAST MASTER. 


THE ROYAL ARCH 


“WE Three,” etc. 
: Act V, s. 2, 1. 122. 
Their purpose is to parle (speak 
And every one lis i EM 
(FEET) will advance, 
TAU Unto his several . . . which they 
know. 
TAU. 

These lines could only have been written by one 
who knew the peculiar way in which by Feet and 
Speech the respective Companions, having advanced 
to each other, close the Chapter. 


MASTER OF THE CRAFT FOR TWELVE 
MONTHS L. 814, 
Take N 
Notice. N.B. |B 
Then at the expiration of the 
year, 
Come... Challenge . . . 
Challenge. . . . By these 
deserts... . 


Installed I will be thine . . . 
Master LM. |M 


171 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


R 

4 F 
I 

In IN N 
I 

It IT T 


IN IT THE INSTALLED MASTER: TAKE NOTICE. 


Note.—It will be seen that the "Installed Master” 
is surrounded by the Letters “T.C.A.R.F.” He has 
been placed iz the CENTRE of them. The Letters 
re-arranged spell: T 

CRAFT 


Shakespeare has thus placed the newly Installed 
Master in the very place where he ought to be, sur- 
rounded by the carrrAL LETTERS which so subtly 
represent the Brethren of the Lodge—the crarr. 

This exquisitely cunning design is alone sufficient 
to prove the wonderful literary craftsmanship of our 
National Poet and the truth that William Shakespeare 
Was a FREEMASON, a member of the Craft. 


THE FATHER L. 831. 
A 
B 
B 
ABBA. | À 
With Three Fold Love I wish 
you all these Three- 
Jo 
Now (N 
1 I 
` sE CG 
T 
IT li 
ABBA (FATHER) NOW 1 SEE (C) im. 


172 


` secrets, such as “M... r... a... I 





THE MASONIC RITUAL LETTER CODE 


Note.—Just above the “Abba” is the spelling of 
“rau” phonetic and the italic y" the ancient Symbol 
used by Pythagoras to denote the triple path, the 
trivia, where the road to the infernal regions divides, 
according to the ancient wisdom, into two; one to 
Elysium, the other to Tartarus. 

The foregoing illustrations definitely prove Shake- 
Speare's acquaintance with Freemasonry and his 
knowledge of the Ritual and its Letter Code, the 
Masonic allusions in the text being clinched and 
amplified by the Capital Initials. 

lt must, however, be remembered that in Love’s 
Labours Lost and The Tempest, this type of literary 
craftsmanship runs throughout the entire plays. Even 
the words in the text are chosen with such precision 
that in numerous instances the first letters of the 
words give the letters used by Masons to veil their 
es Be ae, 
te Wees m... b...’ etc. Fragments are given of 
the above and also of. the Esotery of the Board of 
Installed Masters. There are direct references to the 
Allied Degrees, the Rose Croix and the Sovereign 
Inspectors, etc. 

Shakespeare not only gave to the world broad 


. canvases of human action, but it will now be seen 


that he was equally as great an artist in his miniatures 
+. ..in the minutie of his handiwork by which he 
built up his dramatic effects. Out of microscopic 
little cems—perfect foraminifera—he created a Pageant 
of Life. His Art is the most perfect expression (or 
rather, imitation) of the Workmanship of the Divine 
Power ever given to Humanity, 


173 











VIII 


THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: 
“SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS” 


“And now I will unclasp a SECRET BOOK . . . 
I'll read you matter deep and dangerous . 
Upon the unsteadiest footing ofa sPEAmg, . . ."' 


I HENRY IV, ACT J, $. 3. 


HE facts disclosed in the Shakespeare Folio 

] prove conclusively that William Shakespeare 

, Was a Freemason on the testimony of his 
friends, that he was connected with a Secret Body of 
ersons termed “The Grand Possessors,” and that he 
was “the Worshipful Master of all the Masons.” He 
has, Moreover, proved himself to be a Mason by 
“Signs, Tokens and Words.” He is steeped in 
Masonic phraseology. He knows the usages of 
present-day Freemasons. He is familiar with the 
Ritual Letter Code or Cypher, 

In some instances, the decoding of the Passages may 
be questioned, but there are a sufficient number of 
indisputable ones to prove that the first letters of the 

lay-lines did not fall into position by blind chance, 

ut by deliberate design, and that they bore a Masonic 
relationship to the imagery and matter of the text, 
two plays in particular being woven into a tapestry 
design which is purely Masonic. 

Elsewhere in the plays are numerous other instances 
in which Masonic Lodge customs are written round 
and incorporated in the text, They are quite unsus- 
pected by 2 world that knows not Masonry and evén 


174 





THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


by Brethren who have never thought of examining 
the Shakespeare text for Masonic allusions. The 
Capital Initials down the side are invariably placed in 
order to give the alert Masonic teader positive proof 
that the author was deliberately using Masonic 


. knowledge. 


His mind, apparently, was so steeped in the ethics 
and customs of Masonry that even in the most solemn 
moments of character construction, he could not for- 
bear smiling grimly at its likeness to what he knows 
of Lodge procedure. The “Ophelia” illustration goes 
far to prove that only a saturated Masonic mind could 
possibly have, entwined two such opposite emotions— 
the suppressed mirth provoked by the fears of a 
nervous candidate and the agonised emotion of 
Ophelia at her lover’s mental disorder. Could anyone 
but the creator of the Ethical Symbolism of Free- 
masonry have conceived such a unique piece of 
writing? 

It may, of course, be considered by some critics 
that because all this Masonic knowledge is found in 
the plays, it does not necessarily follow that Shake- 
Speare was a Mason, because these Writings are 
dramatic, with no assurance of anything personal, 

This objection, however, cannot be sustained in 
view of the fact that Shakespeare’s PERSONAL DIARY 
similarly declares very positively his knowledge of 
Masonry and his association with the Fraternity as 
the Founder and Father, 

His diary is a small body of verse. It is called 
"Shakespeare's Sonnets." It is a Mystery Book that 


written, how they came to be printed or what the 

Sonnet-Diary reveals or was intended to reveal, 
There are all sorts of theories regarding the little 

book. Some of them are foolish, some vicious and not 


175 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


a few illuminating. -But the academics will never 
understand either the verse or its import until they 
realize that Shakespeare was a much more clever and 
astute man than they at present credit, He did not write 
the Sonnets for the world of scholars, but to the 
immediate friends of his bosom, the Brethren. It was 
therefore a SECRET BooK written only for those who 
understood. The Sonnets, in fact, was the author’s 
last Secret Book to the Craft. Its real theme was 
“Love,” and its proper title was “The Perfect Ceremony 
of Love’s Right” (Sonnet xxn1—r), 

"Since the Sonnet-Diary contains Secret Knowledge 
and Esoteric Wisdom, the perplexities of the School- 
men regarding its Personal Problems can well be 
understood. "They are of the “uninstructed, vulgar 
world." They have got neither the Pass-word nor the 
Key to enable them to enter the “Tiled-Door.” 
Without these, they can never hope to enter the 
Sonnet Sanctum Sanctorum guarded by the mysterious 
Initials “T.T.” and “W.H.” They can only wrangle 
among themselves on the threshold. 











“The debate has now continued for over a 
hundred years . . . some sixty writers propa- 
gating a multitude of more or less differing 
views . . . vigorous conflicts . . - long discus- 
sions. . . . There is still no agreement” (The 
Problem of the Sonnets, p. 4) J. M. Robertson). 


` There can be no doubt, however, that these Sonnets 
are autobiographical. They are something far removed 
from mere literary exercises, They are lyrical out- 
pourings, purely personal and emotional in which he 
reveals himself almost nakediy. He takes the reader 
into a hidden shrine—the Holy of holies of his own 
heart—and there we see the simplicity of this great 
man, the genius sent by the Great Architect to the 
English race, the mighty teacher William Shakespeare 

176 





THE STRATFORD MONUMENT 
(Erected in 1748) 





"This bust was erected in X748, the “curious original Monument and Bust, 
through length of years and other accidents having become much impaired and 
decayed” (Rev. J. Greene, Master of Stratford Grammar School, 1746.) 


It was "repaired and beautified” according to a resclution of a Stratford 
Committee of November, 1748. 


Tt is not the Bust that was originally erected about 1623 to commemorate the 
Publication of the Folio and the Pasting of the Author. 


Pratz XI 
(See page 193) 





THE LATIN INSCRIPTION AND ENGLISH VERSE UNDER THE 


' THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE i 
STRATFORD BUST : . ies ; 
: with all his hopes and fears, his triumphs and his |: 
tragedy. i : 
i 
: .. "The experiences which rent and harrowed i} 
Waele EE Pr er MARONEM Shakespeare'ssoul . . . arein these poems. ... 
TERRA TEGIT POPVLVS MÆPET OLYMPVS HABET 4 Here and here alone we see Shakespeare himself 
Ma NOUR aaa at Tela vars “loving, admiring, longing, yearning, adoring, | 
Leg EN D A disappointed, humiliated, tortured (Life of ; 
EREA A E AEA ] Shakespeare, Geo. Brandes). 
QVCK NATVRE DIDE WHOSE NAME DOH DECK Y ToMBE 


a MORE FEN COST: SEH ALL Y HE HAL WRITT 
VT PGE 1 : : 
CELLULE ELO agate n well expressed in the following words by one of our 


"The Diary-like character of the Sonnets has been 


Li LATE eet 


finest Shakespearians: 





"He revealed himself to himself in the sancti 
of a Diary-like record (p. 50). They throb with 
passion, they abound in confidences, they are 
self-revealing, they are the analyses of a Poet's 
Soul Therefore they are comparable to a 
DIARY" (The Mystery of Shakespeare's Sonnets, 
p- 88, Cuming Walters). 





Reproduced from Secret Shakespearian Seals. 


The Latin inscription under the Bust was apparently engraved between 1616 and 
1623, but this block represents the epitaph as re-cut in 1748. 


It has always been a matter for conjecture how this inscription and Monument He does not, however, reveal himself to everyone 
came to be erected. ‘It need be no longer. ‘Ihe letter-count of “287” tells at 


that itae instructed researcher into the hidden mysterice of mater. 2 science” quite so openly as is herein indicated, hence the per- 

that it was the work of the Rosicrosse Masons to perpetuate the name af he Founder plexities of the commentators who seek to interpret him. 
t . . 

? "The carving of the letter "rand “a” have The complete body of verse contains one hundred 

and fifty-four Sonnets written from his youth upwards 


$$ — ——. 


a Masonic and Rosicrucia 
“tz.” Sign to denote its secret origin. 





as well as being indicative of the 
also to be found in 





$ T 
Tue Toms Inscrwrrion AT STRATFORD and kept carefully hidden awa’ > 1h sure WARDS of 
GOOD FREND FOR JESUS SAKE FORREARE Trust” until the end of his life. When the Sonnets 

To piso ar DUST ENCLOASED HEARE, | were printed the little Quartos were only issued under T 

BEESTE DE Y MAN Y SPARES THIES STONES, seal to the Brethren. All the verses were mixed up PO 
m like a jig-saw puzzle with nothing to indicate what 
ae eee HE ¥ Movis mY nones, they were about. There was no date on the book 
The inscription shows the “r” and “n” joined together, Ħ, which is the symbol + ey a » 1 
tor “rauy? the “a” being simply two “r3” joined together and placed on their simply a NUMBER, 1609.” As the Sonnets were all 

sides... . þe = 


“Love” verses on diferent Themes, which seemed 
to blend into one long poem, scholars who had no 
esoteric knowledge concluded that the “1 609 Quarto," 
as it is called, was in very truth a long poem, written 
virtually at a sitting (or within a few months) which 
had no coherent message unless it were a glorification 


Prave XII M 177 











1 


f 1 


. SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


of "Dark Ladies," Procreation and Sensuality, for, 
says Brandes, blandly, “Great Geniuses are not Models 
of correctness," ' 

Thus we get the Riddle of the Sonnets. 

I was happily fortunate in having it discovered to 
me, guite unexpectedly, how to set the mixed Sonnets in 
order, and to split the body of verse into the respective 
Themes so that the Poems could be read easily and 
connectedly. Though the information was esoteric I took 
no Vow of Secrecy nor was I obligated. It was left to my 
personal choice to declare or reserve according to 
the exigencies of the situation. At a much later 
date I learned that at least one scholar had declared 
that there were a series of Themes in the Quarto and 
that others had said that the "1609" Sonnet Order 
was not necessarily true. 


` “On analysis the Sonnets are found to treat 
of some half-dozen distinct Themes, sometimes 
briefly, sometimes at length . . . hopes and 
fears regarding his fate . . . desire for immor- 
tality . . . invariably merging into ALLEGORY . . .” 
(ibid., p. 110, Cuming Walters). 

“Sir Denys Bray in The Original Order of 
Shakespeare's Sonnets, is CONVINCED LIKE MOST OF 
us that the Quarto Order cannot be right... 
but his method . . . plunges us into perplexity” 
(ibid., p. 96, J. M. Robertson). 


‘Cuming Walters got very near to the truth when 
he wrote the word “ALLecoRy,” for “Freemasonry is 
a System of Morality based on Allegory and illustrated 
by Symbol.” The chief thing of interest to Free- 
masons is the fact that there are several Sonnets on 
Masonry and the personal note behind each is very 
strong. He writes to the Brethren as one having 
authority and not as a mere scribe, 

The Sonnet Dedication is signed "I.T." which 
simply stands for “Thirty-Three,” the highest Degree 
178 





THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


in Masonry, the two Pillars of Masonry, the “Tau” 
Sign of the Royal Arch, the “Two Crosses” of one 
of the Higher Degrees . . . according to Carlyle, 
“Mysteries of F.M.". It is the same "TT." which is 
to be found in the inscription at the Stratford Monu- 
ment,* and between the feet of the Shakespeare 
Monument in Westminster Abbey, erected by Pope 
and the Rosicrosse Masons in 1738 to mark the 
Emergence of the Fraternity. It is the Sign of the 
Golden ““T-Book” found in the Tomb of Father 
Rosycross, the Founder of the Rosicrucians of which 
Shakespeare was a Fratre and Imperator. The “TT” 
mark is to be found in connection with many writings 
and public inscriptions’ connected with Shakespeare 
. always with an esoteric significance. 

Among the Sonnets is a series to Apollo, the God of 
Poetry and Eloquence. In Mythology he is regarded 
as the Embodiment of Passion, Creative Love, and 
so he controlled all Passions. 

The captions are mine and have been arrived at 
after a literary study of the text together with certain 
enfolded messages which the Author says he has 
“Felled” into the open text (Sonnet txxvi—68). 


Sonnet 80 
Tue Immortality or Love—Lire’s GREATEST 
‘THEME . 
Lv Capitals 
in Text. 


Note NotM.. Not Marble, nor the 
Mason Gilded Monuments 
Of Princes shall outlive (Prince) 

: this powerful rhyme, \ 
Bo. | But you shall shine 

more bright in these 

contents 
1 See Illustration, Chapter IX. 


179 


Boas 



































SHAKESPEARE, 


‘Twain TWAN 


The The 
The Grand . g, 
Geometrician 


Set SET 


Solomon's Sot, 
Temple 
You livein you 
this etc, 


—STATUES OF 
GEOMETRICIAN 
YOU 





Note.—The Capital “Prince” 


with the word 


2 Broils="N 
the perfect balance of the 


ethical tenets of 
the Craft “forget to practic 


NOTE, MASON, PRINCE BOA: 


of stone and internecine quarrels 
Love... 


© what they profess to admire,” 


CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Than unswept stone, 
besmear’d with slut- 
tish time, 

When wasteful war 
shall Statues overturn, 

And Brod: root ous the 
Work oft MASONRY, 

Nor -Mars his sword, 
nor war’s quick fire 

shall burn 


The living record of 
your memory, 


’Gainst Death, and all- 
oblivious Enmity 


Shall you pace forth: 
Your praise shall still 
find room 

Even in the eyes of all 
posterity 
hat wear this world 


out to the ending 
oom. 


(Statues) 


(Ma.s. .) 


So till the Judgement 


that your Self arise, 
ou live in this and 
dwell in Lovers’ eyes. 


S: THE TWAIN 
MASONRY: THE GRAND 
SET SOLOMON’S TEMPLE, 
LIVE IN THI i 


in the text associated 


“Boas” proves quite conclusively that 


oisy quarrels: discor 


ds between individuals,” Note 

Poet’s imagery: war can overturn statues 
among Brethren can root out the 
the principles of Masonry . . . should 


180 


seinen 










































THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


the Poet was familiar 
the word “Boaz” 


way or entrance to King Solomon’s T 
Solomon. One was called 
after Boaz, the 
and Ruler in Is 
‘In Strength.’ ” 

The word in the text '* 


Boaz. It was “so 
£reat-grandfather of David, à 
rael.” The “Import of the 


profound a- familiarity. 


Apollo being the God of Creative Love—h 


all passions in his power according to Mytholo 
thus associated with almos 


the Love idea on which 
founded—cuanrry, ie. the Charity which 
Love, which suffereth long and is kind . . 
species of almsgiving so often mistaken for 
Note the Initial Letters in the first line: 


Not M no. the G M 
Note Mason! Know the Grand Master, 
The only Capitals in rhe 


the Sonnet are the words “Prince, Statues, 
In decoding the Capital In 


is 
.n 


Ma. 


every Sonnet rigidly. 

It will thus be seen that throu, 
every one) Shakespeare “Cogs? 
Letters and those in the 
spell out his secret aside. 
been taught to read. 

The true literary interpretation of this 
indeed of every one, can, however, 
be correct by a free prose renderin 
struing of a piece of Latin. 


181 


» 


Sonnet, 


Pillars set up at the porch- 
emple by King 


named 
PRINCE 


Word was 


aving 


gy—is 


t miraculous genius, with 
modern Freemasonry is 


truly 
ot the 


Charity. 


Quarto text in the body of 


s » 


itials of the lines, the text 
o be used. This applies to 


gh this Sonnet (as in 
the Initial Capital 
body of the text in order to 
s to the Brethren who have | 


and 


only be proved to 
g similar to the con- 
‘Tn such an interpretation 




































































SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


each word should be analysed in its full meaning, for 
the skill of a lyrical poet consists in using diamond 
words that flash many meanings. A word may thus 
have more than one interpretation. In order to be 
‘quite sure that we have got the poet’s meaning cor- 
rectly we must endeavour to get down to the concrete 
irritation that caused him to embody his emotion in 
imaginative verse. (This is usually “Felled” through the 
Sonnet—i.e. woven horizontally through the lines. With 
this particular method we are not at present concerned.) 
' Each Sonnet therefore should be set out so that 
the reader can get a clear idea how to read in prose. 
He can thus check the prose analysis with the 
poem itself and reject or accept the interpretation, In 
this Sonnet, as in others, there are certain misprints in 
the original Quarto, and there are also other matters 
touched upon, extraneous to our present inquiry, so 
the interpretations are necessarily restricted and con- 
densed to the Masonic aspect only, 


Tue Literary INTERPRETATION 
Key Words! : ""The Work of Masonry." 
Word Meanings: 
These contents==these Sonnets, 
All-oblivious— which causes to be forgotten. 
Broils=a confused disturbance: noisy quarrels 
between persons: turmoil, a noisy quarrel or 
discord between individuals. 
Unswept-stone=not swept away by time and there- 
fore crumbling. 
Masonry=a peculiar System of Morality, veiled in 
allegory and illustrated by Symbol. 
Free Prose Rendering: ` 


Neither Marble Temples-nor the Gilded Palaces 
erected by Kings shall outlive this powerful rhyme, 
? Key words are significant words which indicate the 
: "Theme, etc, ` : 
182 





THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


In these Immortal Verses, Apollo, you shall shine more 
brightly than in material Works of Art destined to 
fall into crumbling ruins, o'ergrown with ivy, stones 
that will be smeared with the sluts of Time. 

When War shall overturn the Statues of Stone, like 
the Pillars of Masonry, when noisy quarrels among the 
Brethren of the Craft shall root out the work of the Frater- 
nity, the tenets of Love, of Masonry, yet neither the sword 
of the War-God, Mars, nor the quick fire of war-like 
strife shall destroy the tivinc RECORD of your memory; 
for children of the brain (like my verses) and of the 
flesh are the ever-living, everlasting flowers of Love 
never-to-be-forgotten. 

But the true "Living Record" of my secret passion 
for you will be the “Succession of Masons” who will 
continue until the end of Time to Deify the Love 
Passion of which you are the Symbol in the Mysteries, 

Against Death, the decay of Nature, against the 
cause of present jealous enmities, and against past for- 

otten enmities . . . shall you pace forth Immortal, 

our praise—the praise of Love-—shall still find room, 
a Lodge, to be praised in the spiritual "Temple of 
Humanity, in the eyes of successive generations, all 
posterity, to the end of Time. So till the Judgment 
Day, when all men shall rise who have been created 
by you, Apollo, the Creator and Judge, you shall live 
deified, not only in a Sonnet secretly, but you shall dwell 
till then in the eyes of every true Lover of LOVE, and in 
the broad Charity whichis the pride of. every true Mason. 


* * * * * 
"The subtle manner in which Masonry is mentioned 


. is particularly worthy of notice. The image runs quite 


clearly and admits of no dispute. The Poet is deifying 

LovE in wondrous language. He asserts that Love is 

eternal and will endure the rack of Time. He deals 

with the only two aspects of conflict which Love can 

survive-—material and ethical conflict, He balances one 

off against the other in his imagery. Says he: “When 
183 



































SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


wasteful war shall overturn Statues of Stone (material) 
like the Pillars of Masonry, and when petty jealousies 
Brothers forgetful of Brotherly Vows—shall strike 
at the very principles that Masonry stands for, i.e. 
LOVE, CHARITY (ethical) yet rove will still survive 7 
pace forth (for Masons PACE FORTH by definite Steps) 
despite either material conflict or the noisy wrangles 
of men who forget to practise as Masons what they 
ptofess to admire. 

The association of the Temple of Apollo with 
Masonry is noted by Bro. Geo. W. Bullamore in The 
Antiquity of the Third Degree. 


“We have the Laurel, Sun, Moon, Stars, 
Bees, and the Pentagon associated with the 
Temple of Apollo, while in Freemasonry we 
have all these Emblems associated with the 
Temple of Solomon.” 


We need only notice one more Sonnet, ‘a very 
remarkable one, which has never been hitherto inter- 
preted by anyone. 


Sonnet 148 
THe Worsuiprut Granp Master on tue Ricy Joy 
oF MEETING rn Secrer Lopcs 
LII 
So am I as the Rich whose blessed 


X Key ‘i 
Candidate Can. Can bring him to his sweet up- 
locked treasure 


So So ` 


The The The which he will not every hour 
survey, : 
For For For blunting the fine point of 


Seldom Pleasure. 
Temple and so Rare 
Since, seldom coming, in the Long 
| Year set, : I 
184 


Solomon's | "Therefore are Feasts so Solemn 
S.T. 











THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


Like Stones of Worth they thinly 
placed are, I 

Or Captain Jewels in the Carca- 
net. 


Solomon sor. | So is the Time that keeps you as 
my Chest 
Or as the Wardrobe which the 
Robe doth hide, 
To To | To make some Special Instant 
L special Blest, 
Brother B. By zew unfolding his imprison’d 
, Pride. 
Blessed “Blessed are you, whose Worthiness 
gives Scope, 


Be Be. Being had, to Triumph; being 


lack'd, to Hope." 
SO THE CANDIDATE FOR SOLOMON'S TEMPLE: 
' BE BLESSED BROTHER TO SOLOMON. 


Tue Lrrsrary Inrerpretation 

Key Words: 

_ “Whose Blessed Key." 

“Seldom Pleasure.” 

“Feasts so Solemn and so Rare.” 

“Captain Jewels in the Carcanet.” 

"My Chest... my Wardrobe... my Robe...” 

“New Unfolding his Imprisoned Pride.” 

“To make some Special Instant, Special Blest.” 

“Blessed are you whose Worthiness . , .” 


Word Meanings: 


Captain= Chief. 

Carcanet=an Ornamental Chain, Collar or Neck- 
lace, usually Gold with Jewels. (Nore that this 
word is particularly applicable to the Masonic 
Collars and Jewels of Office.) 


185 











| 


L 
[ 
[ 


tee. ipm pA opm 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF F REEMASONRY 
Note.—The ordinary reader who is not a Mason 


` cannot thoroughly appreciate or understand this 


Sonnet, nor its significance, Only a Master of Thought 
and Language could have said So much and yet said 
so little. Its exquisite subtlety is proved by the fact 
that though it has been in the eyes of the world for 
three hundred years, though thousands of scholars 
have pondered it, no one has ever discovered its secret. 

; To the uninitiated the Sonnet may well be incom- 


- prehensible. To the initiated it takes the noviciate 


from outside the door of the Lodge to the Final 
Addresses to the Newly Installed Master and the 
Brethren. No one but a Mason, familiar with the 
working of present-day Craft Masonry, the Ritual and 
the cuaxcss could have written it. 

It is numbered “52” in the old Quarto, the number 
of weeks in the year. The numbers 5 and 2 added 
total 7, a number of importance to the Brethren; 7 
form a perfect Lodge, etc. 

These are the first outer Signals calling attention to 
the Sonnet. 


Free Prose Rendering: 


So, though “poor and penniless,” yet as a Rosicru- 
cian Philosopher steeped in the Ethics of Masonry, 
am I as the Rich Man whose blessed Key, the pass- 
word, can bring him to his sweet and secret treasure, 
the Sacred Symbols, up-locked behind tiled and 
guarded doors and up-locked in the safe and sacred 
repository of his heart, 

These Symbols of peculiar richness he will not 
every hour survey . . only monthly. If they were 
surveyed too often it would blunt the fine point of 
seldom pleasure, which can be only kept fine by being 
seldom surveyed, a treasure not to be used too often 
or too familiarly, 

Therefore are Feasts—the spiritual Feasts of 
Masonry and the Banquets of the Social Degree—so 

186 





THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


solemn and so tare, solemn in Ceremonial and precious 
as a Meeting of Brothers, rare because the meetings 
are only held at monthly intervals. And because the 
Lodge Meetings, seldom coming, are thus in the long 
year set with its fifty-two weeks, they are like stories 
of great value, thinly placed to show their special 
merit. Or they may be likened to the best of all Jewels, 
those Captain Jewels in the Carcanet, the Chief ones 
worn by Master Masons to denote distinction for 
meritorious services done . . . especially the Charity 
Jewels, the Emblems of Love, Jewels which adorn the 
Collars of the Officers of the Lodge. 

So is the time of meeting, solemn, rare, priceless 
+.» the time that keeps you—my Masonic Secrets, 
as my Chest, my Lodge which is à closed Chest; and 
also in my heart which is enclosed within my breast, 
or as a Lodge-Chest which seems as a Wardrobe 
which doth hide the Robe—many Robes of the Breth- 
ren—the Regalia of which Masons are so proud, 
regalia never to be worn in public, only within the 
Chest and Wardrobe of the Lodge, hidden; the regalia 
Which is, moreover, brought out, apart from the 
Monthly meetings, .to make some Special Instant 
Special Blest, the Annual Time of Installation, by a 
new unfolding of the imprisoned pride of the Regalia, 


unfolding of Pride because all Officers doff their 
badges of office which are newly unfolded to be 
bestowed afresh on_ others according to rank, merit 
and ability. 


Brethren to bestow, and ultimately to attain higher 

Rank as a Provincial, Being had—i.e., having been 

Installed, you are now in command of the Lodge after 

many years of faithful service, while you, my Brethren, 
187 

















SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF F REEMASONRY 
who are not yet so dignified, being lacked, live in the 


' hope of ascending the Master’s Chair, and that in 


due time merit and ability will be rewarded, 
Note.—Within the short compass of fourteen lines 
the imagination of the Poet takes the Initiate to the 
tiled door, gives him the Key, points him to the Lodge, 
shows him the Jewels, movable and immovable, 
recites the Ritual, touches the Ethics of Masonry, 
takes him to the Banquet, tells him the reason why 
there are few meetings in the fifty-two weeks, and 
finally introduces him to the Annual Installation Cere- 


. mony, concluding with the actual phrases which bring 


up to the mind’s eye of every Mason. the beautiful 
solemnity of the Special Charges to the Newly Installed 
Master and to the Worthy Brethren who, though 
lacking Office, are enjoined to hope. 


Apart from the Sonnets which are definitely 
Masonic, Shakespeare grafts his Masonic knowledge 
in Sonnets which are not Masonic—in much the same 
fashion as the “Ophelia” example. One illustration 
will be quite sufficient to indicate how his mind 
seemed to be saturated with Masonic thought and 
phraseology even in his personal poems. 


Tue Rrruat Copg Grarrep To PERSONAL Emotion 
Sonnet 23 


Desritz Wor.piy Verpicrs on a ‘THRonep QuzzN 
-. . “I Love Tuir” 
(O Queen) XCVI 
] Some say thy fault is (o) 
youth, some wan- 


tonness; 
Sacred s.s. ) Some say thy grace is 
‘Symbols youth and gentle 
sport; 
188 





THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


Both grace and faults 
are loved of more 
and less; 

Tracing T.B. } Thou makest faults 
Board graces that to thee 
resort, 


A A As on the finger of a 
Throned Queen (Queen) 


(Jewells) The basest jewel will (Jewell) 
J _be well esteem’d, 
Solomon’s S.T. | So are those errors 
Temple “L that in thee are seen 


To to To truths translated 
. and for true things 
: deem'd. 


How many lambs (1) 
might the stern wolf 
betray, (w) 
Hiram (tay) ui | Iflikea lamb he could (ta...) 
his looks translate! 


Hiram H. How many gazers 
mightst thou lead 
away, 


If thou wouldst use 
the Strength of all thy 
State! 
(wiz) But do not so; I love (1) 
thee in such sort, 
Abif ABiÉ | As, thou being mine, 
mine is thy “Good 
Report." 


HIRAM ABIF, HIRAM TO SOLOMON'S TEMPLE 
WILL LAY JEWELS, A TRACING BOARD'S 
SACRED SYMBOLS, O QUEEN! 


189 

















SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Note.—This cryptically Masonic message is abso- 
lutely true according to the modern Ritual of Free- 
masons. Esoterically, the plain meaning is that out of 
the despised tools of a working operative craft the Poet 
can create Jewels associated with a Royal Order which 
will be well esteemed in such a connection, though of 
base origin. Base faults in a Queen are likewise trans- 
lated into the Jewels of Virtue because of their 
immediate environment, like “Queen Dido!” 

“The last Sonnet Words “coop report” (always 
associated with a close tyled Lodge) subtly indicated 
the System of Masonry he is fashioning, translating 
errors and truths into a new setting, placing the 
"basest jewels” of a working craft into a Solomon’s 
‘Temple and coining the “Hiram Story.” This is the 
first mention of Hiram, etc., outside of the plays... 
Love’s Labours Lost, etc. 


The expositor who would solve the Riddle of the 
Sonnets must therefore be prepared to deal with each 
Sonnet—154—in two aspects, the Code and the 
Literary. He must be able to decode the Masonic 
Messages, etc., and he must be able to produce a prose 
rendering—based on word analysis—that will explain 
the concrete motifs that goaded the Poet into his “fine 
frenzies.” "The man who can do this will have solved 
for all time the Sonnet Problem and brought us 
immeasurably nearer the personality of our Immortal 
Bard. 

The importance of precise word definitions 
cannot be -over-estimated. A single example will 
suffice. 

Scholars have long disputed whether the Sonnets 
I-17 were written to a man, Lord Southampton, or 
someone else, urging him to marry. The poet’s use 
of one word proves quite conclusively: they were not 
addressed to a man at all but to a woman . . . for 
in Sonnet 11 (3) is the line: $ 


190 





THE DIARY OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 


“Where is all she Treasure of thy Lusty Days?” 


Shakespeare employed the word “Lusty” as a 
lyrical poet should do—packing all his expansive 
thought into a diamond-word which flashes more than 
one meaning. He chose it with subtle discrimination. 
And since we may be unaware of the dominant idea 
at the back of the word, one can only assume, to be on 
the safe side, that he intended it to be used in ALL its 
shades of meanings—according to the highest canons 
of poetic skill. 

Now “Lusty” means “Healthy, Vigorous,” but i; 
also means “PREGNANT.” So the Poet (confined 
to onz worn by the exigencies of metre) really says: 
“Where is the TREASURE of thy healthy, vigorous 
days . . . THY DAYS OF PREGNANCY? The 
peculiar Treasure of Women which is a Child or 
Children.” 

By the choice of such a word, Shakespeare points 
out the sex of the person addressed.- Men are ruled 
out by the Treasure of the days of Pregnancy. 

The litterateurs who would get to the bones of 
Shakespeare's imaginative thought must similarly 
analyse each diamond word—em loying all meanings 
that shade into the context. It will be found that these 
particular verses apply essentially to a woman... 
an aristocrat whom he loved. 

‘These Sonnet selections are sufficient to prove that 
Freemasonry was a very personal matter to Shakespeare 
— life to be lived. There are others that show he 
spoke to the Brethren as the Father of a Community 
to his Sons. He was the “assa” of Love's Labours 
Lost, “Prospero, thy no greater Father” of The 
Tempest. He had the right to say to the Brethren, 
“Forget me quite, For you in me can nothing wonTHY 
prove. . . . Let my Name be Buried and live no more 
to shame . . ." (Sonnet LXXH— 149). 

There arè undoubtedly Sonnets which give an 
inkling of a tragedy that had overtaken the author of 

191 





L. 


ETA 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


which the Brethren were cognizant, and which he 
obviously felt might besmirch the Ethical System if 


it were known that he was the Founder. 


What the tragedy was need not concern us. It was, 
however, a factor in the deliberate camouflage of the 
1717-23 Emergence. The Masons of that era knew 
the truth better than we do. They were loyal to his 
specific instructions and kept his name out of sight 
—"Buried." 

In 1788, Bro. Preston speaks of Shakespeare’s 
knowledge of the use of the Hand as a Masonic 
Signal (dustrations, p. 208), “Lift up thy Hanp, make 
SIGNAL of that nor, He Dies and MAKES No sron” 
(Henry VI, Act III). He also lets the discerning reader 
know that he is familiar with the secret of Sonnet 
LXXIV—-150, by his reference to the "Brother who 
was accomplished in every Art . . . and who fell 
a sacrifice to the cruel hand of a BARBAROUS ASSASSIN.” 

There are strong circumstantial grounds for 
believing ‘that instructions were left to the Heads of 
Masonry (probably the “Thirty-Third” Degree, or 
the ""Rosicrosse") respecting the future progress of 


-the Order. These, however, are matters which are 


not germane to the present work. 
‘The “Personal Poems” indicate that he was a Mason 


-equally as clearly as the plays—perhaps more so. 


Such lyrical utterances to the Craft are absolutely in 
keeping with the Masonic Spirit that lives in the 
Great Folio. They are a fitting justification of the 
Men who wrote: “so woRTHY A FELLOW AS WAS OUR 
SHAKESPEARE,” 


192 





IX 


THE SCHOOL OF THE ROSICROSSE, THE 
SECRET ELIZABETHAN LITERARY 
SOCIETY 


A SERIES OF ILLUSTRATIONS 


“From the Most Able to him that can but Spell: There 
you are NUMBERED.” 
“They are offered to your view . . . ABSOLUTE IN THEIR 
NUMBERS.” THE FOLIO PREFACE. 
"Couxr, *tis your Qu.” MUCH ADOE ABOUT NOTHING. 
EFERENCE has already been made to the 
R fact that in the second edition of the Book 
of Constitutions of the Freemasons, by Bro. J. 
Anderson, M.A., D.D., is a very cryptic paragraph 


. the significance of which has hitherto been ignored. 


"AN EXPERT BROTHER BY THE TRUE 
LIGHT can readily find many useful Hits on 
almost every page of this Book which others 
NOT INITIATED cannot discover. . , .” 


Here we get quite definitely a Grand Lodge 
Official pronouncement that there are unTs on almost 
every page—necessarily printed Hints—which could 
only be understood by “Expert Brethren” initiated 
by the “True Light.” 

Bro. Anderson is directly referring to the printed 
matter in the Coustitutions. We are thus given to 
understand that all the true and proper siGNs to know 
a Mason by, are not necessarily confined to the stens 
learned at the Lodge Pedestal for purely Lodge 
observance. There are, in short, Masonic Secrets 


.and Signs to be found in the open text of certain 


books to be understood only by those who have “‘passrp 
N 193 


| 
| 
i 
E 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE VEILS.” Fle jg telling his reader with the same clear- 
ness as Shakespeare to “Learn to Read what Silent Love 
hath writ, to Hear with Eyes,” to take “A Second 
Sight” at the Printed page and so read in an extra- 


THE SCHOOL OF THE ROSICROSSE 


successors, presumably, still hold them after having 
the Folio lays printed in 1623. 
This Secret School associated itself permanently 
With the publications for which it was responsible 
y, sealing such works with a "NUMBER-COUNT 
arrived at Very simply by a definite System, the chief 
being the “Simple Cypher” and the “Kaye Cypher.” 
Every letter had a numerical value, thus: 

A B CDEFGHIKLIM 
Simple: 1 5 3 4 5 6 7 g 9 IO II I2 
Kaye: 27 28 29 30 37 32 33 34 35 10 rr r2 

ADTPORSTUM:Y 
Simple: r4 I4 15 16 17 18 rg oo 9; 22 23 24 
Kaye: 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ar a9 23 24 
There was also a “Reverse Count,” Z being 1, and 
A, 24. The number Seals of “Fra Rosi Crosse” were 
"157" and "287," the numerical Signature of Shake- 
Speare being "103" and "259." Here is the method 
by which names and numbers were linked together, 


Secret Signals in printed works issued by the Fathers 
of the Order, the mysterious “Fra Rosi Crosse." We 
are now in a position to understand clearly the enig- 
matical lines of Bro. Adamson of Perth who, in 1638, 


rote: Pr 
M "We are the Brethren of the Rosie Crosse 
We have the Mason Word and SECOND SIGHT. . , ,” 


: Heis si nalling to Posterity the truth of Masonic Secrets ie ee E 
| A cunningly hidden in the Pages of the old books in a F E e Kaye : imple Kaye 
E variety of Ways and which can only be discovered by R- 32 18 18 
"E taking a “Second Sight” after reading the open text, A 17 17 H g 34 
| | We have already seen and examined at least one I 27 A I 27 

/ method—the use of the Masonic Capital Letter Code R K 10 1o 

i —employed by the Founder of the Rosicrosse School, o 17 17. E. ; 31 

: . William Shakespeare. There were other literary $ i 1 P 18 18 

: codes, Felling and Anagrammatic (which are unneces- I i : E 15 1j 

d Sary to dwell upon) but one of the most evidential 9 35 5 3r 
T methods employed by “Fra Rosi Crosse” was the c A I 27 
| : “Numerical Code" because of. its mechanical pre- R 3 29 R 1; 17 

| cision. This particular code proves quite con. o 17 t7 Es 31 
c clusively deliberate design on the Part of the S 14 14 Tr ae 
eads of the Brotherhood the men with whom S 18 18 103 259 

Shakespeare Consorted, the “GRAND POSSESSORS” E 18 18 

mentioned in the Troilus and Cressida preface (1609), —$ 3r 

who then held the Shakespeare Manuscripts and whose 157 287 


194. 








t f F i 7 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


The prefatory and end pages of all books issued 
by the Rosicrosse Press were numbered with a count 
of words or letters. 

The opening pages of the 1623 Shakespeare Folio 
are all sealed with 157 or 287. Every play is similarly 
sealed in one of the beginning columns and also at 
the end page of the play. The genuine early Quartos 
and poems carry the same numbers all carefully 
arranged by Shakespeare's "Staff of good pens," his 
“Compeers by Night giving him aid,” the Brethren 
(Sonnet txxxvi—116). 

Far beyond the seventeenth century, the descendants 
of "Fra Rosi Crosse" have left their imperishable 
footprints . . . "All Absolute in their numBzrs,” 
the proud boast of the Folio Preface. 'These hall- 
marks appear in Sir William Dugdale’s Warwickshire 
in his references to Shakespeare (1656), Nicholas 
Rowe, Shakespeare's first biographer (1712), and 
the Official Works (sanctioned by Grand Lodge) of 
Bros. Anderson, Preston and Hutchinson. 

The "Numbers" in Masonry are very important 
——more so than is considered by the average Craft 
Mason—and are recognized as such by some of the 
Higher Degrees. The Rosicrucian College in con- 
nection with Masonry specifically draws attention to 
the significance of “Numbers,” based on the “Fama” 
and the “Confessio,” etc.,.the text-books of the 
Rosicrucians. Pythagoras, who is so revered in the 
Craft, particularly with Past Masters, declared that 
“All was form and numser.” He laid it down that 


his pupils could communicate secretly with each - 


other, through interchanging letters for numbers, 
though the text passed through outside hands. 
Our ancient Elizabethan Brethren therefore based 
their peculiar “esoteric ‘‘Number-Knowledge” on 
a very ancient model, associated with the Mysteries. 

The illustrations in this work will demonstrate 
the truth of William Shakespeare’s connection with 


196 





THE SCHOOL OF THE ROSICROSSE 


Rosicrosse-Masonry. The evidence is intended to be 
cumulative and the reader should study the examples 
one after the other from Plate I, facing page 20, to 
Plate XVI, facing page 239. 

The first seven illustrations are facsimile pages of 
the 1623 Great Folio. Plate I, “To the Reader,” is 
the first Folio page and faces the celebrated “Folio 
Portrait,” the only genuine contemporary one in 
existence, the “Chandos,” being purely an imaginative 
picture. Both the Folio pages carry the two Secret 
Seals of the Rosicrosse, the numbers 287 and 157, the 
spelling being manipulated so that the page would 
contain these counts: see Plates I and II, facing pages 
20 and 21. ; 

The number-count is continued in the “ Epistle 
Dedicatory,” the words totalling 157 and 287, while 
“The Names of the Principall Actors” likewise yield 
287: facing pages 48 and 49 (Plates III and IV.) 

Ben Jonson's poem ‘To the Author,” facing page 
76, Plate V, is particularly interesting because of the 
“Seven Set Squares” directly placed in connection 
with “My Beloved, the aurnor.” These Masonic 
Symbols are also associated with the Rosicrosse Seal 
287. The first page of the Folio Comedies, ‘The 
Tempest” (Plate V1), shows the Seal of 157 and 287 
respectively in the first and second column totals of 
words, while the last page of the Comedies (Plate VII, 
facing page 118) again carries the 157 and 287 Seals, 

Plate VIII shows the “Numerical Signature,” 292, 
of “Wm. Shakespeare” associated with the Title Page 
of the 1640 Edition of the Sonnets (facing page 119). 
The student will note that the secret “1609” Sonnet 
Quarto—which was privately issued to the Brethren— 
is not.only marked with Masonic Symbolism (Plate 
IX, facing page 152), but also carries the 287 Signal 
on the last Sonnet page, Plate X. In the Quarto was 
also bound the poem, “A Lover’s Complaint,” the last 
page counting 157. : 


197 












































SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


` This systematic “‘sealing”—which was actually a 
private mark known only to the "Instructed"— 
was not confined to the books sponsored by the 
Rosicrosse Literary Society, but actually extended to 
Monuments, etc. In the Latin Inscription under the 
Shakespeare Bust at Stratford (Plates XI and XII, 
facing pages 176-177), the mysterious 287 again 
appears allied to the Tau of the Royal Arch, showing 
the subtle connection between the two Fraternities. 
Even the Shakespeare Monument in Westminster 
Abbey, erected a century after the Stratford one, carried 
significant Masonic Symbolism (Plates XIII and XIV, 
facing pages 202—203) with the Rosicrosse Seal 157 
(Plate XV, facing page 238). On the Royal Arch 
Jewel of 1805 (Plate XVI, facing page 239) the 287 
has been engraved as a further proof of the subtle 
connection between the Rosicrosse and Freemasonry. 
Apart. from number-counts, purposeful errata— 
intended to serve as hints to the curious reader— 
Capital Letter Codes, etc., our “Ancient Brethren” 
aul even watermarked their printing paper with Signs 
Symbols relative to the Craft: see pages 199-200. 
' "The foregoing examples, though sufficient to indi- 
cate design, are really infinitesimal compared with the 
vast amount of Secret Signals and Numbers to be found 
in many of the old Elizabethan books. Shakespeare's 
Secret School was quite evidently engaged in a work 
which it was thought would help to enlighten humanity 
educationally, intellectually and ethically by methods— 
the. publication of books and plays—which promul- 
gated ideas that would have been frowned on by 
Authority, Juridical and Theological, in an age which 
was. politically and. religiously intolerant, when the 
social gulf was deep and wide and when men butchered 
and burned each other in the name of Religion. 
The Brotherhood based on “‘cuarity” (i.e. Love) 
“was necessarily a secret one; but it sought to signal 
to future ages that it was in the vanguard of Advanced 


198 





ANINNUSUS 


a S ET. 





E AE T 


MASONIC WATERMARKS 





The above watermarks are in a book entitled Truth Brought to Light and discovered 
by Time, Anonymous, 1651, discovered by Dr. Prescot, of “York Place,” Franklin, 
Mass., U.S.A., and forwarded to me. a 

‘The top illustrations represent the Hat worn by the Worshipful Master in the 
Lodge in that Era, 1651. 

"The "'c.s.* denote *Rosie Crosse," and the flourish of the Ribbons on the first 
one forms the well-known Masonic Symbol, "The Square and Compasses," "These 
are apparently repeated, though not so clearly, in the second illustration. “z.p.” 
probably stands for one of the Higher Degrees with which I am not familiar. 

The Jugs in the bottom examples represent symbolically the holding of wine 
pressed from many grapes, an image used in Elizabethan days, to denote that 
Masonry was a philosophic combination drawn from many sources, distilled and 
blended by an expert and then given to the Brethren. 

The small triple circles represent the Three Degrees and also are emblematic 
of the Grape-watermarks which are to be found in clusters repeatedly in the old books. 

The animal is a representation of a Squirrel that stores its nuts and acorns for 
future use. 

The top ornament is a Phallic Symbol indicative of Creative Power. 

"The ornament rests on a Helmet (the chin-chain attached makes the symbol 
quite clear) which is none other than the Helmet of Pallas Athena, the Shaker o£ 
the Spear of Wisdom at the Serpent of Ignorance, according to Mythology. The 
Roticrosse were known as “The Invisibles,” for their members symbolically wore her 
Helmet which in the Myths made the wearers Invisible. 


199 











THE PILLARS OF MASONRY 





These watermarks are to be found in 1638, 1674, 1640, Review of Council of 
Trent, De Augmentis, Advancement of Learning. 


’ . 
‘The first one seems to indicate the Pillars of Masonry in association with the * 


“Fleur-de-lis,”’ a Rosicrucian Emblem; the second one repeats the emblem together 
with the Grape-Clusters and the letters “A r.c.,”' i.e. “A Rosicrosse”; in the third 
the symbol is similar to the one already explained, but the letters are different. 
It is obvious that “‘s.20.’’ stands for “Brother Boas.”” f 

In Secret Society, by Mrs. Pott, there are hundreds of watérmarks shown in a 
series of plates nearly all of which possessan esoteric significance, Masonic, Rosicrucian 
and Personal. “The Blazing Star,” the “Grand Geometrician,” etc., are water- 
marked in the pages, definitely Masonic and Rosicrucian. ) 

The Rosictosse watermarked into the paper their secret emblems. “There 
are as many as forty or fifty different designs to be found ina single volume... + 
Every different device or even modification . . . necessitates a different mould. 
"The average cost of one of these implements to-day is between £7 and £o. When 
in one single volume we find upwards of thirty or forty different varieties of water- 
marks, the mind reels at the enormous expense which this fact involves." So writes 
Harold Bayley, the author of a classical work on Symbolism. . 

-These Secret Marks definitely witness the birth of Freemasonry which began 
in the Elizabethan Era, our secret Masonic watermarks being an adaptation of the 
idea of the Albigenses of a previous generation. 


200 





i 








THE SCHOOL.OF THE ROSICROSSE 


Thought, the Drama and Ethical Principles, by 
sealing all its activities with a “Number-mark,” 
whose monotonous repetition would prove the reality 
of the organized Fraternity. 

Some time after the Book of Constitutions was pub- 
lished, a writer who signed himself “Plain Dealer? 
in the Daily Post for September, 1724, declared that 
Bro. Anderson was “an orthodox though marus- 
MATICAL Divine." “Plain Dealer” was evidently of 
the Rosicrosse, and wrote his letter to leave a record 
of the fact that the book carried definite "counts," 
and was sealed over and over again with numbers 
which are the numerical signatures of the Founder 
and "Fra Rosi Crosse." The second official historian, 
W. Preston, also bears his testimony to the connection 
of mathematics with Freemasonry. 


“Masonry is wisely planned; and in the inves- 
tigation of its Jatent doctrines the philosopher and 
the Mathematician will experience equal delight 
-e e (P 57) 

“Arithmetic teaches us to deduce the powers 
and properties of wuMBzns, which is variously 
effected by Letters, Tables, Figures. . . . By this 
Art, demonstrations are given for finding out any 
certain NUMBER. . . . (p. 81.) 


“The Mystery of Masonry consists in natural, 
MATHEMATICAL and mechanical KNOWLEDGE . . . 
and some part they still comczAL." (p. 140.) 


Elsewhere (p. 147), Bro. Preston refers to numer- 
ology as “the Arte of Changes" and the “Faculty of 
Abrac" which has “a magical signification” (pp. 16 1—3). 
‘There can therefore be no question that secret numbers 
could be, and were, changed into names and words by 
our ancient Brethren. 

The third official historian, Bro. Hutchinson, also 
refers to the art of Numbers in The’ Spirit of Masonry 


201 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


as the “Faculty of Abrac” which was used by Basilides, 
the author of “365.” Bro. Hutchinson gives a very 
pointed illustration of the numerical value of the word 
“appaxaz.” Ee also manages to slip in the name of 
the Founder, similarly to Bro. Preston. 

Since their works were passed as official documents 


by the Grand Lodges of their respective eras the. 


truth of the secret knowledge —swith the far-reaching 
consequences herein illustrated —is beyond question. 


' 202 





THE SHAKESPEARE MONUMENT AT WESTMINSTER ABBEY 





The Shakespeare Monument was erected in 1740 under the auspices of the 
third Earl of Burlington, Dr. Richard Mead and Alexander Pope. The Ben Jonson 
and the Gay Memorials were erected about the same time and are examples, being 
secret proofs, of the survival of Shakespearc’s Literary Society and the "then powerful 
prevailing influence on English Art of Rosicrosse Masonry,” says Sir Robt. Rice 
in Hamlet and Horatio. “The crossed legs have a Rosicrucian significance,” 


Prare XIII 
(See page 193) 


1 


m, 


THE LOWER PART OF THE SHAKESPEARE MONUMENT 





Reproduced from Hamlet and Horatio, Sir Robert Rice. 


The ornamentation of the stockings is “very carefully executed. . . . There 
are various Cabalistic Signs, among them five cruciform flowers... the full 
engrossment (in shape) setting forth the embodiment of the Rosicrucians. 'l'he 
Crowned Head resembles in impressionist style, a Human skurr." (Sir Robert 
Rice, Hamlet and Horatio.) 

‘The entire drawing is Masonic and indicates the Skull, Crossbones and Coffin. 
The "rz!" Capitals have been carefully cut at a later date to indicate that the 
“T.T”? Society was in existence in 1787. 


Prate XIV 


X 


THE LITERARY, CHARACTERISTICS OF 
THE RITUAL AND THE AGE WHICH 
PRODUCED SUCH CHARACTERISTICS 


“There be THREE DEGREES of this Hiding and Veiling of a 
Man’s Self: the First... CLOSENESS, RESERVATION, and 
SECRECY; the Second . . . when a Man lets rALL siGNs; the 
Third, when a Man industriously and EXPRESSLY FEIGNS 
AND PRETENDS to be that HE IS NOT," (i.e. when he is 
"made to represent the body of our Master, Hiram Abif"). 

ESSAY "SIMULATION." 

"Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and 

take for granted, nor to find talk and discourse but to WEIGH 


” 
and CONSIDER. FRANCIS BACON. 


N view of the startling Masonic facts brought to 

light in the previous pages through research 

work which is quite original, we may profitably 
stress some of the evidence already adduced. In the 
recapitulation I must necessarily touch slightly a per- 
sonal note, that my reader may the better be acquainted 
with my interest in William Shakespeare as a Free- 
mason. 

When I was made a Mason over thirty-five years 
ago I was a journalist. At that time my youthful head 
was naturally crammed with wise saws and diamond 
phrases cribbed from Shakespeare, together with many 
historic mysteries. Who was Junius? The Man in 
the Iron Mask? etc. To these early impulses must be 
attributed the fact that from the night of my Initia- 
tion I have ever taken a keen interest in the literary 


203 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


characteristics of the Ritual, and in all subjects, direct 
and indirect, bordering on Freemasonry. 

In those early days my mind was greatly intrigued 
with its Genesis, the “Whence and How” of the Cult, 
the man or men responsible for the Mystery, the 
writer of the Charges, the creator of the Ceremonial. 
It was a very fascinating problem. 

Needless to say I did not discover these hidden 
secrets. Indeed, I gradually realized that neither 
historic works, Past Masters, nor the Rituals of the 
Higher Degrees threw any light on the Genesis of 
the Speculative Craft or on the identity of any historic 
personage who had conceived “The Perfect Ceremony 
of Love's Right" (Sonnet xxiri—1) and had shaped 
and welded into modern language an unique concept 
which is “a thing of beauty and a joy for ever.” 

Through this wide gap of time— midst vicissitude 
and change—I have never once wholly lost sight of 
the Quest . . . the Gleam which once beckoned me 
to follow. Whatever, then, I have written, or may 
write, is not the result of hasty thought or ill-digested 
theories. Indeed, I am not so much concerned with 
theories as with actual facts. If we can succeed in 

` getting our facts right, logical analysis will necessarily 
provide the only correct working theory that will 
fit them. 

Unhappily, an inquiry into the origins of the Craft 
sometimes occasions sharp dissensions. Yet I hope 
that the “New Truth which is Old” that I have enun- 
ciated will not prove to be in any sense disconcerting, 
but, rather, a helpful contribution to the greatest of 
all Masonic and Literary Problems. No one should 
know better than a Freemason that Truth often appears 
in strange Shapes and quaint Robes. Consider, there- 
fore, judicially, what I have written, in the open court 
of your own mind, for are we not “Free Men and of 
mature agel” Free to think. . . . Free to resolve 
every human doubt. . ... Free to follow wheresoever 


204. 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


Truth may lead! If I can set my Brethren, and through 
them the world, a-thinking on certain new lines—by 
serving as a finger-post to point the way—lI shall be- 
satisfied. I seek neither to convince nor to persuade, 
but simply to make every Masonic student weigh and 
consider. 

_ Ina broad outline such as this must necessarily be 
in dealing with "the Literary Characteristics of the 
Ritual,” I am not concerned with the varying details 
between the different Workings nor the exact cere- 
monial and working practised at the Lodges of Pro- . 
mulgation: (1809-11) and Reconciliation (1813-16), 
or the Rites respectively practised by London and 
York in 1792, or whether copied faithfully and 
infallibly by Bros. Phillip Broadfoot and Hen. 
Muggeridge in 1820 (Stability) and Peter Gilkes in 
1823 (Emulation). I am only concerned with general 
principles, the broad scheme of the craft Ritual— 
which is necessarily the Pyramid base of the super- 
imposed Higher Degrees. I have sat in sufficient 
Lodges to know that the Creative Spirit behind each 
Working is the same, despite variations, in all broad 
Masonic Fundamentals . . . words, grips, ritual, or 
lecture. Common to all Workings is a mystic link 
which lifts the Ethical System out of the rut of the 
tawdry and common-place. 

We therefore begin with the fact that a Free- 
mason’s Lodge seeks to be an active institution 
where a Brother may learn by parable and symbol 
definite ethical principles according to @ set Ritual of 
Working Rules and their translation as a code of ethics 
into the work of everyday life. It is thus that Specu- 
lative Masons build Spiritual Temples of Truth and 
Beauty. : . ; 

How came this set Ritual of Working Rules to 
be created? How came the Ethical System into 
Pringi, Which was first . . . Freemasonry or the 

itual? em 


205 


NU ERN ‘cuca omit 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Now the background of our Speculative System is 
the Sacred Mysteries of forgotten civilizations. The 
ancient Wisdom, the principles of the Roman 


. Collegia, the working tools of a Medieval operative 


craft, the Ceremonies of the Knights Templar, beloved 
by Saint Bernard, are, apparently, all interwoven in 
our Masonic Rites. The Plumb-Rule has been found 
in Pompeii, the Square in Egypt, the Compasses in 
Greece, the Rule and Slippers in Rome, the Masonic 
Apron being the counterpart of the Golden Fleece of 
Jason and the Argonauts. Probably, as alleged, they 
were all Symbols of Ethical significance. But it does 
not follow that though our present System draws its 
sustenance ‘from these ancient centres, with their 
Nature Worship of Sun, Moon and Stars, our 
Modern Craft Rite of Three Degrees was practised in 
Ancient Egypt, or that to-day we are following an 
exact Ritual of Solomon: and thus participating in a 
Ceremonial older than the Holy Roman Hierarchy. 
: When the Mysteries were swept away by the Holy 
Church there was necessarily a break in the continuity 
of descent with pre-historic time. With the Fall of 
the Roman Empire and the smashing of the Medieval 
craft gilds by State Edicts there were further breaks. 
Evidence has been adduced (Chapter I) which proves 
that the 1723 Grand Lodge of Freemasons was not 
the natural outgrowth from a body of operatives that 
perished 1350-1425; and that our modern System, 
couched in modern. language, must have arisen in England 
between the times of Spenser’s “Faerie Queene” (1579) 
and 1723. For its Third Degree someone specially 
created “a feigned Story,” as Shakespeare termed it, 
“the Legend of Hiram Abif” as a Rite analogous to 
the Death Rites and Resurrections of the various Gods 
of the Mysteries. 

It is obvious that the modern Ethical System and 
the Ritual are one and the same, i.e. an oral ceremonial 
which has been reduced to book form. Which, then; 


206 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


came first? The System or the Book? Quite clearly 
the Book. : 
Because the printed Ritual has only been in existence 
a little more than a hundred years (G. Claret, 1838, 
A. Lewis, 1869, etc.) it does not follow that the 
Oral Ritual before this date was not based on an 
"original Ritual" which Bro. Gould suggested may 
ohce have been in existence. It is true that we have 
no knowledge of "an original Ritual" left in manu- 


“Script, neither have we any knowledge of the edited 


MSS. of the James Authorized Bible (1611), nor the 
MSS. of the Shakespeare Plays (1588~1623). Yet 
these Manuscripts must once have existed, for they 
have been printed a million times from authentic, 
genuine writings by hand . . . fashioned word by 
word, line upon line, stroke upon stroke by SOMEONE. 


- The Church is founded on the Bible. The Anglican 


Service on a carefully thought-out prayer book. 
Similarly, the important fact to remember is this, that 
behind the complete System—which bears marks of 
design—stands man the Thinker, Freemasonry is 
thus the outward effect of an invisible cause, the 
systematic THOUGHT of a concealed DESIGNER or 
Designers expressed in a concrete Ritual. 

Our first task, therefore, is to ascertain the earliest 
period in which a modern writer or writers, using 
modern language, could have created or reconstructed 
our. Modern Rite as: interpreted by the Modern 
Ritual. 

Manifestly the Modern Ritual (and therefore 
Speculative Masonry) could never have been known 
in the Medieval Era, There was then no flexible 
English language in existence by which a nimble 
thinker could clothe his thoughts. There was no 
proper medium by which the idiom of a foreign tongue 
could be correctly translated. Our flexible Ethical 
Charges could never have been written until SOME- 
ONE first created words for Englishmen to use. We have 


207 







































































SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


already seen that that “somsonz” was Shakespeare 
with his 20,000 word vocabulary, many being new and 
strange words—derived from the roots of ancient and 
modern languages. 

Now the language of the Ritual is so modern that 
the majority of our learned Masonic Brethren have 
no doubt that the Ritual and Modern Freemasonry 
are of comparatively recent origin. The scholarly 
. modernist— making a determined stand against 
unhistorical claims and unscientific pretensions"— 


assigns them to the 1717-23-38 era, the immediate | 


years after the “Four Old Lodges” of London met at 
the “Apple Tree Tavern” and united to form a Grand 
Lodge. It is alleged that the cream of our Masonic 
Symbolism was-then created, apart from the question 
of language modernity, because of what may be termed 
"negative evidence." I 


1. Researchers hitherto have not been able to 
discover the actual practices and the number of 
Degrees (the Craft and the Higher ones) known 
to the Freemasons pre-1717. 

2. It is asserted there is no reference any- 
where pre-1717 to the Legend of Hiram or the 
Ethical Concept of King Solomon's T'emple. 

3. Masonic scholars, generally speaking, con- 
sider that this particular era was favourable for 
the creation of the Craft concept of “the Great 
Architect” and for the promulgation of a Deistic 
philosophy in place of a Trinitarian. 


- Ignoring the fact that Bro. Anderson and the Grand 
Lodge emphatically declared that they had rigidly 
adhered to the Ancient Landmarks, introduced no 
innovations and had simply inherited an Ethical 
System handed to them by a previous generation, the 
Masonic Modernist nevertheless believes that in some 
mysterious way Bro. Anderson and the Grand Lodge 

208 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


created the Rites of Craft Masonry and laid the foun- 
dations of the “Development” of the Rituals of the 
Higher Degrees which were created during subse- 
quent decades—some fifty years or so. 


“The course of this development was a 
curiously secret thing, alike by accident and 
design. . . . Those concerned elected apparently 
to hide. . . . It was never betrayed by an 
unguarded , word." (Emblematic Freemasonry, 
p. 15, A. E. Waite.) 


This admission leaves the entire question of the 
creation of the Ritual an open one. There are no 
grounds, no proofs for foisting the creation of Free- 
masonry on to the shoulders of the 1717 Masons. 
Bro. Waite does not know. He only thinks and sus- 
pects they created something and hid it. The reader 
of this book, however, already knows that she man who 
did the "hiding" «vas Shakespeare, the creator of the 
Hiram Story. 

“The development (of the Ritual) was so curiously a 
secret thing” that it could only have taken place in 
the vivid realms of the imagination of those “1717 
Theorists” who believe that the Symbolism of the 
Royal Art began to evolve in the illiterate lodges of 
craft masons, daubers and labourers; and that even- 
tually the full flower of Craft Masonry blossomed in 
the studies of Bros. Anderson, Desaguliers and the 
Grand Lodge, created and fashioned by them; or that 
it was evolved in the convivial Lodges of the 1717— 
23-38 London Brethren in some mysterious manner 
no one knows how or by whom. It has been suggested 
that "Gentlemen" joined operative lodges in some 
remote era and persuaded the down-trodden, wretched 
operatives to give up gradually their trade union ideals 
which revolved round wages and hours of labour for 
philosophic concepts—‘‘spiritualizing Temples and 

o 209 


— 

















z $ 
[e 














SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


moralizing on Tools.” The truth is that even in the 
Elizabethan era there were many so-called “Gentle- 
men" who could not even read or write. 


There is no direct proof that Freemasonry at 


some particular period became telescoped into - 


the operative’ craft; or that “Gentlemen” joined 
operative lodges; or that such lodges suddenly 
or gradually changed their operative ideals— 
wages, hours and conditions of labour—for 
Ethical ones which were out of the orbit of the 
grossly illiterate, horribly poor, struggling stone- 
masons, daubers, plasterers, navvies and labourers 
of the building trade . . . regarded by the 
State as mere hewers of wood and drawers of 
water. 


Old Lodges” were operative lodges, “the direct 
descendants” of the Middle Age Gilds; or that 
the ethics of Freemasonry. grew naturally or 
unnaturally out of their creedal crudities. There 
is as much difference between such theological 
beliefs and the broad-based cuarity of Masonry 
(“to be good men and true") as between American 
Jazz and a Beethoven Symphony. 

There is no direct proof that the Ritual “evolved,” 
for ethical concepts cannot evolve of themselves. 
‘They can only be created and recreated by the 
genius of an informed mind or minds. Moreover, 
the practical difficulties of getting a Ritual univer- 
sally accepted . . . presumed to have been in a 
state of flux for many years... by widely 
spread Lodges—a Ritual emanating from a 
Central Grand Lodge in London—has never 
been faced by any 1717 theorist. Roads were 
bad and communication difficult in that era as 
well as in Feudal times. It would have been little 
less than miraculous for members of scattered 


210 


There is no direct proof that the 1717 "Four 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


: Lodges to have remembered and memorized an 
oral ceremonial heard only once or twice during 
an ever-changing evolution from 1717 to 1738. 


Definite historic proof has, however, been adduced 
that there were no operative lodges in existence in 1'717 
for all such trade combines were swept away by a series 
of enactments that began in 1350. Long before the 
close of the sixteenth century the craft gilds of working 
masons had perished. Individual masons persisted, 
but not as members of a trade gild or lodge. There 
is not a scrap of evidence anywhere—letters, minutes, 
manuscripts or historical facts—that, in the teeth of 
the State Laws, specially devised out of fear of rebel- 
lions and peasant risings (like the Wat Tyler, John 
Ball and Jack Cade outbreaks) one solitary lodge 
of operative masons survived the 1425 Decree or the 
Elizabethan Acts of Parliament. The Elizabethan 
punishments were so terrible that workmen dare not 
have held a private lodge or a public assembly for the 
purpose of discussing wages, etc. It would have been 
incipient rebellion and dealt with by the military. 

Having thus clarified the position—for there could 
be no Ritual evolution in operative lodges when none 
existed after 1425, nor any evolution prior to this 
date, there being no flexible language until 1 579-8 9— 
we can proceed to examine the Ritual, alleged to have 
evolved from 1717 to 1738 from one crude operative 
Degree to Three. 

The first important fact—already touched upon— 
is that the Bible enters into the Ritual, the details of 
King Solomon’s Temple being taken from it. The 
very phrase, "And Scripture informs us,” combined 
with the Lodge use of the “Sacred Book,” indicate a 
familiarity that could never have been possible in an 
England ruled by the Priest. Yt was only in the reigns 
of Elizabeth and James that an ethical ceremonial with 
its private interpretations and the use of Holy Writ 


2311 























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


dare have taken place in a private Lodge of Laymen. 
In the reign of "Bloody Queen Mary” the Bible 
—which had never been in general use—was 
suppressed, : 

It is therefore self-evident that the Ritual was con- 
ceived in a Protestant and not a Catholic era. It was 
necessarily shaped and fashioned either in the Eliza- 
bethan or the Augustan Age of Letters, ie. the 
Shakespeare or the Pope era. It is, naturally, Aa//- 
marked with the characteristics of the Age that produced it. 
Does it, therefore, bear the distinguishing marks of 
the 1717-38 period? i 

dt does notl 

With the Restoration in 1658 there was a distinct 
change in English literature in matter and style. 
Dryden began a new type of expression which was 
maintained and developed by Pope and his contem- 
poraries. ‘The prose may have become more perfect 
than the Elizabethan, but it was chiefly executive or 
technical; the observance of definite rules that had to 
be mechanically followed. 

Enthusiasm was repressed ; the imagination tem- 
pered; symmetry and uniformity had to be preserved 
at the expense of decoration and invention . . . so 
pronouncedly a characteristic of the Elizabethan era. 
We have only to think of the mechanical couplets of 
Pope, the polished phrase of Addison, the pungent 
satire of Swift, the steel-like precision of Hume, the 
hard matter-of-fact diction of Gibbon, to realize at 
once the tremendous gulf between the lively imagina- 
tion of the 1616 Elizabethans and the classically cold 
expression of 1717 Augustan convention. ‘There was 
then a new spirit of criticism abroad, bitter, biting, 

satirical. Picturesque fancy was anathema. 


Austin Dobson says: To be clear, logical .. . 
became the unwritten code of the times. Working 
prosaically its chief gifts were in prose. . . . It 

212 








THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


gave us a poetry of convention uzexempled in 
mechanical accomplishments." — (Chambers's Cyp.. 
Eng. Litt.) 


If one thing is more certain than another in the purely 
literary domain it is this: That she Spirit and the Lan- 
guage of the Ritual is not the product of the high-water 
mark of a mechanical, prosaic conventionalism which 
glittered with the cold fire of an iceberg and was devoid 
of the warm humanities of life. Its modernity is not the 
mechanical polish of the 1717 Augustan Age any more 
than it is the product of the purely respectable veneer 
of Victorian sentimentalism. "The Ritual has a dis- 
tinct flavour of its own, as pronounced as the difference 
between a Corona and a Cuban. Even one unversed 
in literary style and thought can feel on very little 
reflection the tremendous gulf between the didactic, 
technical precision of the poet Pope who sets out in 
plain, set terms: 


“Man! Know thyself, presume not God to scan; 
The proper study of mankind is Man,” 


and the Master-Poet who wrote: 


“What a piece of work is Man! How infinite 
in faculty! In form and moving how express 
and admirable! In action how like an Angell 
In apprehension how like a God! The beauty of 
the world, the paragon of animals!” 


The difference in treatment of the same subject— 
Man and God—is exactly the difference between a 
Ritual created and shaped in the Spirit of the 1717 
Augustan Age, of which Pope was the leader, and the 
Ritual we actually possess. Pope could never have 
written Shakespeare's lines, neither is there any con- 
temporary of Pope who could have infused into our 
Ritual its dramatic imagination and living power. It 
glows with warmth, tenderness, emotion and vigour 
from the first line to the last. : 


213. 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


The style dates itself. It is purely Elizabethan. It 
could not possibly be the product of an age of metallic 
artificiality of structure to set form and rule that would 
have made the Ritual a wooden, dead and lifeless 
thing. A literary epoch that prided itself on clarity of 
expression could never have produced the imaginative 
phrase: 


“The light of a Master Mason is darkness 
visible; serving only to express that gloom which 
rests on the prospect of futurity. . . . It is that 
mysterious veil which the eye of human reason 
cannot penetrate unless assisted by that light 
which is from above,” etc. (The Ritual.) 


There is an indefinite definiteness in this passage— 
like the impressionism of Turner or Whistler—as 
contrary to the Pope era as to the Medieval. Itis this 
particular spirit—the spirit of Romanticism, Imagina- 
tion, Fancy, Picturesqueness which arises from deeps 
of Mystical Spirituality—that pervades and saturates 
every word, thought and turn of expression. It is 
found, later, in the Theosophic Mysticism of the 
Higher Degrees. 

The modern Ritual was conceived in an age afire 
with a spirit akin to Milton and Bunyan, not Locke 
and Hume. Even Bro. Waite, 1717 theorist though 
he be, reluctantly confesses that— 


“The early eighteenth century.is about the 
last period to which we should willingly refer 
the invention of an Eloquent Symbolism and the 
morality of a Great myTH.” (Emblematic Free- 
masonry, Pp. 113.) 


I should think so! The force of circumstances 


drives the impartial student right away from the age 
of Pope to the Golden Age of Letters. . . . the Age 
that vied for comparison with all that ‘insolent Greece 


214 








THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


or haughty Rome ever sent forth.” (Ben Jonson on 
Shakespeare in the Folio.) When an authority like the 


. late Bro. J. Hughan affirms that one of the most 


remarkable of Elizabethan books, The New Atlantis, 
“seems to be, and most probably is, the Key to the Modern 
Rituals of Freemasonry,” we can be quite sure that we 
are more than justified in saying that the Ritual is 
steeped in the Elizabethan Spirit. (Quoted in The 
Columbus of Literature, by W. F. C. Wigston, p. 218.) 

Assuming, however, that a mechanical age might 
possess a creator capable of producing something at 
variance with its spirit, who were the Freemasons that 
could have produced the Ritual in 1717-23-38? 

The only men were Bros. Anderson and Desagu- 
liers, both Divines and scholars of Scotch and French 
descent. Both have left literary works. There is abso- 
lately nothing in their writings to indicate that they 
possessed any CREATIVE GENIUS, or the necessary 
peculiar ability, allied to a mature and comprehensive 
scholarship, to conceive and technically produce the 
Ritual. 

Bro. Anderson’s work is mediocre. It evinces the 
painstaking talent of academic education only, patience 
and industry. . 

Bro. Desaguliers’ works have much more literary 
brilliance and reflection. He had the inventive mind 
and much eloquence. But he lacks the Divine touch 
of Genius, the Fire that descends from above. Neither 
scholar had the gift of creative powrr. ‘The Grand 
Lodge Committee—the only persons who could have 
assisted them-—were all literary nondescripts, apart 
from Bro. Payne. 

But the suggestion that the Ritual was the work of 
a Grand Lodge Committee is palpably absurd. The 
Ritual is a classic and a worx oF art. It has found, 
favour in the sight of men and trvep because it is 
impregnated with that subtly mysterious something 
that may be called “Divine Impact,” by virtue of which 


215 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


all great Classics live through varying ages and climes. 
It touches the common chord of all Humanity. 

Now zo great Work of Art has ever been accomplished 
by a Committee. ‘The members invariably pull different 
ways. There are squabbles over trivial, concrete points 
that are plain and straightforward. How much more 

pronounced would such squabbles have been in a 
“1717 ‘Reconciliation’ Grand Lodge Committee” over 
new ideas, new methods, new signs, new symbols, new 
Degrees? Itis certain there would have been a cleavage 
in the ranks. "The "Ancient Landmarks" of the alleged 
"One Degree Operative" would have been held to be 
in jeopardy by some of the Brethren. There would have 
been jéalousies, cabals, splits, secessionsand new Orders. 

When we know that the mere change from the pre- 
:1717 isolated, independent Lodges to a Grand Lodge 
business Combine caused grave bickerings from Masons 
who wanted to preserve. their independence, we may 
be quite certain that where Ethical Principles were at 
-stake there could neither have been alterations, inno- 
vations or creations imposed upon the 1717 NATIONAL 
FRATERNITY—then - practising Masonry all over the 
country, in Ireland and Scotland —without tremendous 
opposition of which shere would have been left 

` RECORDS. The Committee who had conceived the 
alleged new system of Three Degrees would have been 
asked very plainly, “ho made YOU Rulers in Israel?” 

With comparatively little trouble the distinguishing 

- characteristics can now be tabulated with certainty, 
since the most formidable of the a priori claims of the 
1717 modernist have been. dealt. with. The first 
important fact which emerges is: 


1. THE UNITY OF CONCEPTION AND 
EXPRESSION THROUGHOUT THE 
THREE CRAFT DEGREES. 


‘The Ritual bears the impress of a sincLe MIND that 
conceived and executed. The Degrees are linked one 
` 216 





$| 
i 


a 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


to the other. That is the chief technical beauty of the 
Ritual as an art Form. The Second Degree arises 
naturally out of the First. The Third completes the 
Stoty and rings down the Curtain on the Drama of 
ife. 

1. The Birth of a Thinking Human Being. - 

2. His Education through the World. 

3. His Death and translation to a Higher Life. 


The finished Ritual thus bears its own internal 
witness that it could never have been spatchcocked 
together in successive decades by ethical and literary 
tinkers. He who understands how a creative work is 
conceived, shaped and born, could not possibly believe 
that this unique culo christened “Freemasonry” 
was the creation of many men working in many Lodges 
or even one Lodge. 

The primal conception is too unique, too vast in 
its scope: the inter-relation between the details and 
the perfect whole is too precise, and the symmetrical 
relationship of the Three Stages of Man through the 
Degrees too interwoven to be anything other than the work 
of ONE SUPREME THINKER, who had surveyed 
a tremendous field of knowledge, and had poured 
into the crucible of his mind a mass of facts relating 
to God, Nature, Humanity, Art; and from such 
ingredients in diversity had created an Emblematical 
System in Unity, an Ethical Temple in which the 
Brethren might worship, united in the search for 
the Lost Word, Love," a Word that would solve the 
world's economic, moral and' religious problems, and 
which was to be found by each seeker within his own 
heart. 


The Unity of the Ritual with its search for the ‘Lost 


"Word," could no more have been produced by a 


Committee, than The Tempest or Hamlet could have 
been created by all the talented scholars conjoined 
from 1717 onwards, 


217 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


2. SIMPLICITY : THE ART WHICH CON- 
CEALS ART. 


When we. examine the Ritual in detail, its literary 


beauty is very striking. It is couched in simple 
language similar to the prose of the Bible. It is 


strong, direct, clear, with a nervous style typically . 


English. The opening of the Initiation Ceremony 
is indicative of the clarity of treatment that runs 
throughout. i 


“As no man can be made a) Mason unless he 
is free and of mature age, I demand of you are 
you a Free Man and of the full age of twenty-one 
years?" 


The simple words are exactly apropos to the 
peculiar circumstances of the Candidate, equally as 
much as the more elaborate utterance uttered under 
very different conditions. 


“Our Brother has been made to represent one 
of the brightest characters recorded in the annals 
of Freemasonry,” etc. 


We are apt to forget the supreme Art by which 
these striking Lodge effects are produced. The simple 
language blinds us to the fact that only a great creative 
artist could have produced round the meditative 
silence of two monthly intervals, such a series of 
cumulative incidents, which steadily heighten and 
‘deepen in intensity of personal emotion until it 
reaches a climax in the Finale of the Master Mason’s 
Degree, as impressive after years of iteration to the 
Old Past Master as to the newly-raised Brother. 

The effect produced is nothing less than the result 
of the conscious exercise of an Art Faculty which conceals 
Art... the Art of a practical executive Thinker, 
` an Art that could never have been “stumbled into” by 


218 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


accident or design by untrained writers, by immature, 
uncertain thinkers, by unskilled executants unused 
to fitting “she word to the action and the action to the 
word.” 

None of the 1717-38 men had the necessary technique 
—apart from the conception of the prime idea—to 
produce the necessary Art effects from simple words. 
The trained mind behind the Ritual, actually framed 
his ideas with one eye on the Candidate that he might 
impressively understand and follow easily the ordeal 

. and one eye on the Brethren that they might 
assimilate without effort the simple words, thus 
sowing seeds for futute ethical studies. 

Such craftsmanship can neither be bought nor 
acquired. It is a Divine Gift. It is to be found neither 
in the "Rummers Tavern,” in Grand Lodge Com- 
mittees, in the heart of a Doctor of aaa or a 
Fellow of the Royal Society. It is the “fine frenzy” 
that abides only in the soul of great genius. 


“Such great wits,” said an old Elizabethan, 
“are not the common Births of Time. . . . Like 
the Phoenix, Nature gives the world that Indi- 
vidual Species but once in five hundred years.” 


3. THE EUPHONY OF PHRASE. 
It is significant that there is the same triple form 


of expression that is characteristic of the great genius 
of the Elizabethan School, viz.: 


1, “Reading maketh a full man; 2, conference, 
a ready man; 3, and writing an exact man, . . .” 
1, "Some are born great; 2, some achieve great- 


ness; 3, and some have greatness thrust upon 
them." . 


The mannerism of this triple beat is notable 
throughout the Ritual. 


219 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


1, "The Sun to rule the day; 2, the moon to 
govern the night; 3, and the Master to rule and 
direct his Lodge.” 


We have the same music beat in the more elaborate 
sentence: : 


1, “The Sacred Writings are to govern our 
Faith; 2, the Square to regulate our conduct; 
3, and the Compasses to keep us in due bounds 
with all mankind,” 


The average Freemason does not analyse the music 
of the words, but the beat and the rhythm run through- 
out like crystal streams of living waters. Even an 
untrained literary ear can detect, with little conscious 
effort, she euphony of phrase and sentence, the harmonics 
of pure verbalism alone, and the exquisite balance of 
the sustained passages. This triple mannerism runs 
throughout the entire Craft System from the Turse simple 
knocks on the door to the turer Principals who Rule. 
We thus possess positive evidence of conscious design 
and purposeful intent on the part of a thinking MIND 
hitherto unsuspected. 


4. THE WORKMANSHIP OF A POET. 


On higher literary grounds the fact emerges that 
the mind behind the Ritual was that of a Poet. What 
makes a supreme Poet? A prime factor is the gift of 
being able to see ANALoGrzs in things the most diverse. 
He must therefore possess imagination, fancy, a sense 
of the beautiful. He must be able to give to “airy 
nothings”—unsuspected by the average man—a con- 
crete form (a Symbol) that can be seen and understood, 
“a local habitation and a name.” It is the Divine 
Touch which transmutes to gold the “poet’s pen.” 

‘The philosophy behind the Ritual is poetic and the 
Author necessarily a ‘“‘Poet-Philosopher,” for “the 

220 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


true philosopher and the true poet are one,” says 
Emerson. The Creator of the Ritual must have had 


a mind similar to that of the ancient philosopher. 
who wrote: 


“I found that I was fitted for nothing so well 
as for the study of Truth, having a Mind nimble and 
versatile enough to catch the resemblance of things.” c 


5. ANALOGIES OF ALL KINDS. 


Now the Ritual is replete with analogies from the 
first note, “Brethren assist me to open the Lodge,” 
to the conclusion, “that we may ascen to the Grand 
Lodge above,” or the Lodge Finale, “according to 
ancient custom Lock up our Secrets in the sare! , 
REPOSITORY of our Hearts,” etc. 

There is such a welter of piled-up analogies enshrin- 
ing deep philosophic and moral truths by a Mind 
“nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblance” 
between rude, concrete forms—the maul, chisel, ladder, 


pillars, aprons, the Tyburn Tree, Sun, Moon and 


Stars, etc., and their relationship to the purely abstract 
metaphysics of the Soul, expressed in the simplest 
manner with unerring accuracy, nothing vitally omitted, 
nothing dragged in untowardly—that one can only 
stand reverentially speechless at the wonder of it all. 


6. ITS MORAL PHILOSOPHY. 


Apart from these characteristics there is a maturity 
of thought, the product of a ripe philosophy, indica- 
tive of “the years which bring the philosophic mind,” 
The Ritual is a Moral Treatise on human Éfe...a 
series of reflections thrown upon a Lodge Screen in 

1 The play on the word “sarz” is quite a characteristic of the puns 
and quibbles which saturate Shakespeare’s Works, He was the great 


adept at the use of setting “Diamond-Words” in his line to fash 
numerous meanings. 


221 


|] 
|] 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


the form of a succession of pictures from the cradle to 
the grave, the happenings that are likely to befall a 
Child of Man in his progress from the Eternal Past 
to the Eternal Future in the Eternal Now, which, in 
the Ceremonial, represents our passage through the 


. world. . . . Simple language, simple pictures which 


(Freemasons) 
serve as “CANDLES to LIGHT Poor FO O L S the 
way to dusty pzATH,"! the Candidate being the Actor 
that “struts and frets his hour upon the Stage" of life 
and eventually passes into the wings to await the arrival 
of others who are to be “re-born.” 

The philosophy behind the Ritual is so natural, so 
simply expressed that it is difficult to realize that there 
is a profundity of meaning behind the simplest symbol. 
It is as difficult to realize as the fact that there are 
depths of knowledge, wisdom and philosophy in the 

lays, undreamt of by poor pedants who shallowly 
imagine that Shakespeare wrote solely for “carn,” to 


, amuse the idle hours of idle clowns at the Globe 


"Theatre, uninfluenced by any nobler incentive. 

"In all cases of danger and difficulty in whom do 
you put your trust?" asks the Ritual. The Candidate's 
answer at once links him to the Creator who marks 


even the Fall of a Sparrow. From a philosophy of ` 


Faith in a Divinity which shapes our end arises the 
philosophy of works without which Faith is pap; the 
educative mind and soul culture of the noviciate; his 
relationship through moral duties to all men, based on 
a lifelong search for a ""Losr won," a Key only to be 
found in his own breast wherewith to solve the Riddle 
of Life, a personal attitude to be expressed in the 
trivial round, the common task towards God, one's 
neighbour and one's self. 

- These are the metaphysics of the soul expressed as 


1 Note this marvellously subtle reference to the Third Degree 
with “the glimmering ray” of the candle thrown athwart the Solemn 
Rites of the Death Chamber of “poor” Freemasons. 


222 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


a practical reality." It is the highest type of Divine 
Philosophy shorn of all the academic jargon of the 
thousand and one Schoolmen of the Ages. 


7. THE ORATORY OF THE RITUAL. 


The Ritual was never intended to serve as a mere 
reading exercise. Much of its beauty would be lost 
were it only read in the quiet of one’s study. It was 
compiled, essentially, zo be spoken, to be declaimed, to be 
memorized, to be pondered over phrase by phrase, so that 
the inflection of the voice or the gesture of the hand should 
interpret the sense. ‘There are passages of declamatory 
power that rise in language, imagery and sustained 
eloquence to the highest heights. Who could have 
composed them? No one but a suPREME ORATOR. 
Someone who had often looked into the eyes of his 
fellows and watched the play of his words sweeping 
across the chords of their souls, stirring their emotions 
and quickening their resolutions. 

Bros. Anderson and Desaguliers were both public 
speakers, but there is nothing to indicate that they 
were orators of the first water, that their utterances 
ever flamed with the fire of a Demosthenes. Yet no 
one could have written the oratorical, recitative pas- 
sages who had not faced an audience, who knew not how 
to rise slowly from height to height with solemn 
gravity until a crescendo is reached . . . as in the 
sonorous, ringing tones of the W.M. to the newly 
raised Master Mason: 


“,. . that even in this perishable frame 
resides a vital and immortal principle which 
inspires a holy confidence that the Lord of Life 
will enable us to trample even the King of 
‘Terrors beneath our feet, and lift our eyes to that 
bright morning Star whose rising brings peace 
and salvation to the faithful and obedient of the 
human race." 


223 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


There is the cadence of a dying fall in the last 
words. ‘The hearers have been stirred by an immortal 
note of triumph: “Oh Gravel waere is thy Victory] 
Oh Death! wuere is thy Sting!’ And then by a 
touch the orator takes them by the hand as their 
emotions subside, to walk beside the still waters, 
beneath the quiet stars, their hearts inspired by 
unconquerable hope to fight the good fight in the 
battle of life. 

The writer of the Ritual was no ordinary public 
lecturer (like Bro. Desaguliers) but a consummate 
orator who possessed an Art Power similar to the 
craftsmanship used by Shakespeare in Mark Antony's 
Oration. He must have possessed a natural strain akin 


to one of the great orators of whom Ben Jonson wrote: ° 


“He commanded where he spoke and had the 
judges angry or oe at his devotions. No 
man had their affections (i.e. Passions or Emo- 
tions) more in their power. . . . His hearers 

. could not cough or turn aside . . . lest they 
missed a word." 


8. THE DIGNIFIED CEREMONIAL. 


The work of a Lodge centres round its Ceremonial 


“which is precise, defined, orderly. The Worshipful 


Master presides over a band of Officers, supported by 
Past Masters. Each officer is presumed to know his 
work in every particular. There is a formal opening 
and closing Rite in each of the Three Degrees. The 
signs, knocks, perambulations, gestures, etc., are all 
inter-related, There is the same UNITY found in the 
Ceremonies as in the Literary Unities. The same austere 
severity pervades the formal opening as it does the 
closing, deliberately introduced to set the spirit that 
should animate all Lodge meetings, those “Solemn 
and rare Feasts which are set in the Carcanet of the 
long year like precious stones at Monthly Intervals, 


224. 





ET ERE RET 


THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


lest the fine point of Seldom Pleasure be blunted by 
too much familiarity." (Sonnet 111148.) 

In all the Ceremonial, opening, closing, initiation, 
passing, raising, the Board of Installed Masters, the 
Higher Degrees, there is nothing hazardous or arbi- 
trary introduced. The MIND that conceived all these 
formalities must have been thoroughly familiar with 
Ceremonies that were dignified and impressive. "The tang 
of Royal functions, Court procedure and cold Judicial 
splendour impregnate the entire services. ‘The Thinker 
behind the Ritual could never have produced such a 
severity of dignified tone if he had not been steeped 
in procedure of a similar character. One can imagine 
a Shakespeare who fills his pages with Kings and 
Queens, who even knows the exact ceremonial of a 
Legatine Court, projecting such workmanship on the | 
pages of the Ritual, but zeither operatives nor Philoso- 
phers, ignorant of formal ceremonial, could have produced 
«n atmosphere to which they were strangers. 


9. THE WORK OF A SCHOLAR. 


The Unknown Thinker must also have been a 
Scholar of a Rare type, with a mind stored with know- 
ledge drawn from the Ancient, the Medieval and the 
Modern (Elizabethan) world. The archives of the 
past must have been ransacked and assimilated. If 
the Ancient Mysteries of Egypt and Greece contri- 
buted their quota, so, too, did the Medieval operative 
gilds, as well as the customs of the contemporary world 
(particularly seen in the Penal Signs of the Degrees) 
in which he must have lived. All this is done with 
such subtle art that one is only conscious of the 
exterior glitter, whereas the Ritual, like a berg of 
jewelled caves, has vast unseen foundations, deeper, 
greater, grander than the awe-inspiring peaks of 
concepts which now sail the ocean of time. 

There are two ways in which a scholar can impart 


P 225 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


knowledge. He can: treat his theme elaborately, 
minutely, exhaustively, so that when the last word is 
written there is nothing more to be said, as it were, on 
the subject, like Fraser’s Golden Bough or Spencer's 
First Principles. 

There is another method, in which the scholar veils 
his knowledge purposely. He writes suggestively to stimu- 
late reflection and research. He leaves deliberate gaps 
to drive a student into a train of thought. He uses a 

. word or a phrase and leaves it to the “discerning mind” 
to reflect that it could only have been used out of a 
tremendous storehouse of systematized knowledge. 
The style of the Ritual is similar to 


“ 


+ + + one of the most suggestive authors that 
ever wrote . . . whose sayings are like some of 
the heavenly bodies that are visible to the naked 
eye, but in which you see constantly more and 
more, the better the telescope you apply to them." 
(Archbishop Whately.) 


This quotation accurately expresses my point of 
view. It is a judgment profoundly true of the Ritual. 
‘There is a tremendous reserve of power behind the 
simplicity that makes its impact dynamic in its inten- 
sity of expression. It is a quarry to which Masons will 
repair for generations to come, finding in it veins of 
golden knowledge which must be thoroughly com- 
prehended as systems of imbedded thought in the 
mind of the Author. . : . 

He used, in fact, the discovered treasures of the 
World Universal as a Master Craftsman and Artist, 
utilizing, like a Master, after strict examination, only 
the most precious and flawless stones with which he 
fashioned a new and Ethical Solomon’s Temple for 
the healing of the Nations. 

It is for this reason that men of different types of 
mind see in the Ritual the flashing of different precious 
stones—chalcedony, sardonyx and pearl—Theosophy, 


226 


Wi 


THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 
Occultism, the Wisdom of the Ancients, Jewish cus- 


- toms, the Geometry of the Greeks, Egyptian Rites, 


the operative usages of the Medieval stone masons, 
contemporary customs, etc. 

‘They are all there, every symbol employed having 
behind it in detail a long history of descent which 
stands the most minute and critical examination. It 
is from these living Stones, so symmetrically and so 


harmoniously blended, that the Temple of Free- 
. masonry was built. Though much of its flashing glory 


may be obscured because our half-opened eyes cannot 
grasp it in its entirety, one cannot even momentarily 
contemplate the Edifice erected by the Master Builder 
without involuntarily giving the Royal Sign, and ex- 
claiming, as Solomon is said to have done, “Oh! 
Wonderful Mason!” 

The type of mind that conceived and executed the 
Work was certainly no other than Shakespeare, the 
Man who had taken all knowledge to be his Province. 
We can say of him, as Prof. Nichol once wrote: 


"As far as. possible in one man, the learning 
of the Age met and mingled. All the literary 
languages of Europe... the pages of the 
classics . . . the philosophies of the West . . . 
science . . . were part of his Province. . . .” 


i0. CREATED BY A NOBLE SOUL. 


The Ritual, moreover, could never have been pro- 
duced by anyone that had anything ignoble or mean 
in his nature. A corrupt mind and a shrunken soul 
could never have produced it . . . only a Moralis: 
who practised what he taught. The Founder must of 
necessity have taken friends into his confidence in 
order to promulgate his tenets and to establish the 
Fraternity. The System would have died still-born if it 
had not had behind it the sanctity of a pure and noble 
life. Its ethical authority would have been cut at the 


227 











' SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


very roots had there not been personal virtue behind 
the writer and which was known to his immediate 
associates. 

As a Work of Art, a System of Morality, a Philo- 
sophic Concept Freemasonry stands second to none. 
It is uniguz. Ruskin lays it down as an axiom that a 
depraved man cannot produce a-supreme work of Art, 
that the "'viciousness" will "out" somewhere in his 
workmanship. In short, that a man's real character— 
if he be, inherently vicious—beats and betrays him. 
It stains the white radiance of eternity, the “Immortal 
Conception,” if the life be of the earth, éarthy. It is 
only Beauty on the Body of Truth that can create a 
Divine Form; Love, not Lust that is eternal. It is 
only purity of motive that carries the supreme Artist 
to his highest flights as in the Elder days of Art when: 


Builders wrought with greatest care 
Each minute and unseen part, 
For the Gods see everywhere. 


‘The Ritual could only have been produced by one 
who was sound in head and pure in heart with no 
ordinary purity, for it is stecped. in the purest morality, 
the most sublime poety and exquisite emotional 
spirituality, One can well apply the old Elizabethan’s 
phrase to the “gentle Shakespeare” that “All who were 
great and good loved him.” 

The Ritual sprang from a pure life and a pure mind 
+ +» not from any charnel house of corruption. It is 
an immortal classic like all great works which spring 


from the purest passions of the Soul. It is destined: 


to be recited by the children of men until “the Solemn 


. Temples, the great Globe itself shall dissolve like an" 


insubstantial pageant faded." 


1:1. A MAN OF THE WORLD. 


The Founder of Freemasonry must also have been 
a man of the world who knew the value of the Social 


228 


THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


Degree of Song and Mirth in promoting kindliness 
and good feeling among the Brethren in the feast of 
reason and the flow of wit in the Lodge where contro- 
versial subjects are forbidden. The “‘Merrie Meetings” 
that took place at the “Mermaid "Tavern" may have 
had a far deeper significance than has hitherto been 
suspected. In any case we: can well imagine that he 
visited similar Elizabethan gatherings to the one 
described by Prof. Nichol. 


“Could we have had better company than that 
which talked and laughed and speculated and 
exchanged ox mots around the Board . . . while 
the flowers exhaled their fragrance, and the music 
tang, where there gathered about the choicest 
spirits of the time. There poets, thinkers, men 
of science and of the world, jurists and diplomats 
associated on equal terms. . . .” 


One can almost imagine in this vivid description a 
Masonic gathering when the call has been from 
“Labour to Refreshment.” 


12, THE WORK OF A DRAMATIST. 


But the most striking feature of the Ritual is its 
sweep of Dramatic Power. When the Curtain rolls up 
—with the opening of the tiled door to the candidate 
—the spectators, who are the Brethren, are brought 
face to face with the Drama of a Human Life—the 
common lot of every one—portrayed in THREE 
ACTS or Three Degrees. Though the subject-matter 
of the Play is steeped in the Moralities, the Philo- 
sophies of the Ancient Cults and Christian Ethics, 
yet the supreme test of the Drama is everywhere 
apparent . . . Action, Action, Action. 

The dramatic unities are observed, the sequence 
of incident maintained, and the entire movement 
works up to a climax . . . the Tragedy of Hiram. 


229 

















SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


It is followed by what in weaker hands would have 
been an anti-climax, the recitative of a fragment of 
traditional history and an exposition of a number of 
working tools. But this is so skilfully executed that the 
supplement serves as a fitting scaling down into the 
common normalities of every-day life from the heights 


to which the Lodge has been carried by the solemnity 
of the Preacher... . 


“Remember now thy Creator in the days of 
thy Youth. . . . For Man goeth to his long 
home, And the mourners go about the Street.” 


In the Epilogue our tense emotions are restored. 
The Drama is finished with the remembrance that 
the duties of life are more than life. 

Unlike an ordinary play, there are no stage effects. 
The results are attained despite the most difficult 
circumstances—fatal to popular success in any ordinary 
theatre production—to carry the hearer’s mind onward, 
by dialogue, the swift-moving verbal action of the 
respective parts by unskilled amateurs, the dramatic 
gesture and movement of the actors on the floor of 
the Lodge as the Story of a Life unfolds itself from 
Degree to Degree, or, rather, from ACT to ACT. 


SHAKESPEARE, THE CONCEALED FREE- 
MASON. 


‘The world does not know the Author of the Ritual.: 


Nor does the majority of the Brethren. It slipped into 
the world in MS., no one knows how, with the 
System it inculcated. An anonymous Work! An 
anonymous Ethical System! The Author veiled him- 
self in a cloak of invisibility, known, necessarily, to 
comparatively few. It was as though he had said: 
“By the minp alone will I be seen!” 

To have maintained the role of “A Concealed Man” 
successfully, he must have been a Proteus who had 


230 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


the facile gift of changing his disguise daily, a Past- 
master in the art of simulation and dissimulation, 
with the secretive mind of our ancient Brother who 
wrote: 

“Set it down that a Habit of Secrecy is both 
Politic and Moral. . . . Who will open himself 
to a BLAB or a Babbler? 

“Mysteries are due to Secrecy. . . . Talkers 
are commonly credulous... . . He that talketh 
what he knoweth, will also talk what he knoweth 
not... . . 

“The advantages of simulation and dissimula- 
tion are . . . to lay asleep opposition . . . to 
reserve to a man's self a fair retreat. . . . The 


best is . . . a power to feign if there be no 
remedy." 


This constitutes the marrow of Freemasonry 
regarding the manner in which our Masonic Secrets 
should be guarded, equally as much as the Ritual 
injunction, “never improperly to disclose . . . and 
cautiously to avoid all occasions which may inadver- 
tently lead you so to do." It would apply with peculiar 
emphasis to a concealed Founder, especially if circum- 
stances were such that he had no choice but to remain 
concealed, possessing only “the power to feign since 
there was no remedy.” - Secretive by nature, making 
a virtue of necessity, he might almost have written 
the Elizabethan phrase that must have been known 


‘to him... . "It is the Glory of God to cowczaAL a 


thing and the Glory of a xine to find it out.” 


THESE DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS of the 
Mind behind the Ritual may not be individually very 
remarkable, but, as a combination of mental and 
ethical qualifications, which the UNITY OF THE 
ENTIRE WORK proclaims are to be found UNITED 
in a SINGLE MIND, it is so extraordinary, that the 


231 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF F REEMASONRY 


` Personal Identity of the Man ought to stand out even 


against the dark background of the centuries that have 
slipped into the historic past. Let us deduce, then, 
from the Ritual the TYPE oF man that must have 
produced it. He must have been: 


A Scholar. 

A Philosopher. . 

A Perfectly Wise Man. 
Tolerant of Religious Opinions. 
Of Splendid Tastes. 


Possessed of Great Aims for the Good of Men.. 


Gifted with a Wonderful Mind that had a 
Universal Grasp of Knowledge. 

Morally Admirable. 

A Man of the World. ; 

One that had taken all Knowledge. to be his 
Province. p 

An Orator, a Poet, a pRAMATIST, Familiar with 
Ceremonials. 

4 Concealed Man. 


It is now transparently clear that the Art Form of 
the Ritual was never produced by a Committee. Its 
Unity throughout proclaim it to be the product of 


a Single Mind. Where, then, is the Man who. 


possessed all the enumerated characteristics which 
have been clearly discovered? Is he to be Sound between 
1717 and 1738? Nol What man among Masons 
possessed within himself all the qualifications in the 
above list from 1717 to 1816 when the Lodge of 
Reconciliation was formed to consider minor ritual 
details between the London and the York Grand 
Lodge methods? 

There is not one. 

Could Bro. Anderson have given us the musical 


rhythm of the simple words of Freemasonry? Could’ 


232 





ARERCUOE IRA 


THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


Bro. Desaguliers have created the Dramatic Action - 


and Plot? Did either of them possess the microscopic 
mind for detail combined with a Universal grasp of First 
Principles? "They could no more have conceived and 
technically executed the Complete Idea behind Free- 
masonry (of which the Craft Ritual is but a Part—the 
Base for the Higher Degrees of Christian Mysticism 
similarly created and concealed) than Bro. Findel 
with his mechanical temperament, or some of his 
modern confréres whose minds merely run like the 
catalogue index of uninspired dull plodders. 

In the early eighteenth century there was no one 
who possessed the peculiar cast of mind to create so 
unique a presentation of Truth in Symbolic Form, a cast 
of mind that must have been properly environed for 
it to have been stirred into such singular activity. 
The finished concept with its Pyramid of Degrees, is 
as far above the minds of the 1 717 Brethren, as genius 
is above mere talent, or the towering Himalayas 
above the plains. There is the same difference between 
the Ritual we possess and a Ritual conceived and 
written by mediocre minds, operatives, theologians, 
academics or business-men as there is between a 
Turner and the insipid hack-work of a pot-boiler, 
The one lives. The other is not even wooden. 

Behind the touch of Turner is the mind of a man 
who sers... who knows how to produce his 
effects by a simplicity of effort which predicates an 


„exquisite discrimination of taste, feeling, craftsmanship, 


and a profound knowledge of the fundamentals of 
ART, the result of practical experience allied to genius. 

Behind the many touches of the Ritual there is 
the same kind of genius and unerring accuracy in the 
blending of colour, light, shade, form and composition. 
The visible points we see, indicate a vast store-house 
of esoteric information, a pyramid of heaped-up 
treasures which calls for an explanation. 

The theorists who believe that Modern F reemasonry 


233 





























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


was created from 1717 onwards have to find a man 
who had this peculiar cast of mind, who was also a 
supreme dramatist, who could adapt the dramatic 
art not for the characterization of an individual, but 
for the characterization of Universal Man and his 
relationship as-an ethical being to the world, to Nature 
andto God. In the 1717 era even Pope, Swift, Addison, 
Rowe, temperamentally and intellectually had not the 
necessary qualifications. It is therefore futile to urge 
that a combination of mediocre men, whether operatives 
or "Gentlemen," created the System and the Book. 
‘Water cannot rise above its own level: And the level 
of inspiration rises no higher than Bros. Anderson 
and Desaguliers. Any number of ordinary minds 


joined to theirs could not have brought down the fire . 


from heaven though they gashed themselves with the 
knives of despair. 

The “Anderson-Desaguliers School" never produced 
the Ritual. They never claimed to have produced it. 
‘They were emphatic on the- point. They simply 
asserted that they were faithful to the “‘O/d Charges” 
of Freemasonry in their efforts to bring to the notice 
of the world a System which had hitherto been 
practised in secret. 

There is now no reason to doubt their veracity, for 
we have found that the Ethical System is revealed in 
its entirety in the Shakespeare text. We know now 
that the “Old Charges” did not revolve round a 
crude operative legend, but round the “making, passing 
and raising’ of Freemasons, a system of Three 
Degrees that had been worked as far back as 1650 on 
the authority of Bro. Preston, confirmed by the 1702 
Haughfoot Minute, the 1711 Trinity College MS. 
and the alleged “Exposures” from 1723 onwards. 

Standing in the 1717-23 era with the Ritual in 
our hand, which contains the portrait of a Personality, we 
can look backwards and forwards along the stream 
of time. If we want to find the Creator of the Craft, 


234 


oe 
—- ————— SEE SR 


THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


we must trace the hidden 1717-23 spring to its 
source, the secret "channel" and the "Authority" 
(superior to the 1717] Grand Lodge) mentioned so often 
by Bro. Preston. We must go back step by step, 
decade after decade, guided by the sicns that have 
been purposely left to enable us to discover the 
First Great Freemason, who is in Hiding. 

As we trace the line of descent, we find sufficient 
evidence of the Speculative System we practise to-day, 
widespread among “Gentlemen” of culture, xoz 
operatives. From Addison, 1712; Plot, 1686; Ashmole, 
1646; the '"Acception," 1620; to Boswell of Scotland 
in 1600, the Masonic line runs onwards. It runs to 
the year 1589 when the Play was written which we 
have analysed, Love's Labours Lost, which contains 
the thrilling sentence: “I will visit thee at THE LODGE. 
.. . I know where it is siTUATE. . . . Come, 
JAQUEN. e. - 

We have reached the end of our journey. We have 
found somzons whois writing phrases that were 
clearly Masonic and hinting at the words of Masonry. 

Is this he who can sign the Bill of Contents, the 
distinguishing characteristics of the Ritual? Who 
could have created out of the wreck of the Old-world 
Myths and the crash of the Medieval operative craft, 
a new Ethical System which outbreathed Faith, 
Hope and Charity in place of strangulation at Tyburn 
and Charing Cross by a cable-tow, in place of the 
thumb-screw and the rack, the chopping-block and 
the Fires of Smithfield? Is ‘this the Man who was 
saturated with the Old Rites of the Egyptians, the 
Mysteries and Myths of the Ancient World with its 
esoteric Symbolism? A Man with a wide sweep of 
field and a microscopic eye, touched by Romantic 
Medievalism and possessing an intimate knowledge 
of the old craft gilds? A Man with the music of 
poetry within his soul and the dramatic art of the 
playwright within his fingers? ; 


235 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


An examination of the Shakespeare Plays on the 
same literary lines will disclose the fact that the same 
distinguishing characteristics are there to be found 
which we have discovered in miniature in the Ritual. 
"There are a thousand authorities drawn from all over 
the world that lay their tribute at the feet of the 
Supreme Dramatist as the man who seemed to possess 
within himself every branch of Knowledge and 
Scholarship. The characteristics of the Ritual and 
the Plays run on parallel lines. They were wombed 
out of the same cast of mind. And the Author linked 
for ever his Masonic knowledge to the plays by his 
marvellous Images and his expert use of the Ritual 
Cypher. 


J. O. Halliwell who discovered the "Regius Poem" 
has said that: 


"Every unprejudiced enquirer will admit that 
in all probability English Masonry in its present 
state was not introduced before the close of the 
sixteenth century.” (Ancient F.M., p. 48.) 


This more than confirms the position. The Ritual 
was the product of the Elizabethan Age, the creation 
of a single mind, a unique genius, no other than the 
Immortal Bard, referred to by the 1623 Folio Editors 
as “A WORTHY FELLOW” and by Ben Jonson as “my 
BELOVED, the AUTHOR, and WHAT HE HATH LEFT US,” a 
sly hint that Shakespeare had left behind him secretly 
the Complete System of Freemasonry to the “Thirty- 
third Degree." This is confirmed by Bro. Yarker, 
who, in 1883, declared that England was the home of 
the Higher Degrees which she “possessed prior to 1717,” 
for in “ ‘Long Livers,’ 1721, the Higher Degrees 
are alluded to in express terms,” (Spec. F.M., pp. 2—4) 

The reader is now in possession of sufficient data 
to enable him to arrive at a decision respecting the 
Masonry of William Shakespeare. There are other 
, facts in this connection which it is impossible to disclose 


236 





THE LITERARY CHARACTERISTICS 


for the moment, for it would make this work too 
voluminous. But the facts now made public speak 
for themselves. Shakespeare proves his Masonry by 
“SIGNS, WORDS, TOKENS and the PERFECT POINTS,” 


: etc. Iam too old a Mason to be easily imposed upon 


or deceived, Every student of the era and every 
Shakespearian scholar knows that there is some 
MYSTERY connected with his life. It has never been 
thoroughly discovered because, to a very large extent, 
it is a Masonic one. 

It is manifest that the secrets of Masonry dare not 
have been written in the plays by anyone who had 
taken the oath not to “‘indite, mark,” etc. They 
could only have been written by one who was above 
the VOW as the Father of the Fraternity. With such a 
Creator as Shakespeare, any attempt to "Improve" 
the Ritual by operatives or “Gentlemen” from Ashmole 
to Dunckerly is manifestly an absurdity. It would 
be a gilding of refined gold, the adding of a perfume 
to the violet. 

Bro. Vibert has stated that “Our Legend says that 
Masonry came from France in St. Alban’s time.” So 
it did. There was a Medieval St. Alban of A.D. 303 
and an Elizabethan St. Alban of 1560~1626. Both 
were MaRTyRs and ong came from France, for he 
travelled long from “East to West.” Our ancient 
Elizabethan Brethren bluffed the world by mixing 
the two St. Albans and the ages in which they lived 
- . . in the “feigned stories” or "operative legends" ' 
made in their Rosicrosse Scriveneries. 

Shakespeare buried his Secret Ethical System like 
a bulb and left it to root itself in the darkness for a 
hundred years before the first shoots appeared in 
the planned Emergence of the 1717-23 Grand Lodge, 
the centenary of the Great Masonic Shakespeare 
Folio of 1623. 

To Bros. Anderson, Desaguliers and the 1717 
Masons who guided the Emergence, we Masons owe 


237 


L 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


a'special debt of gratitude. But to a “Concealed 
Man" and a little band of Elizabethan Rosicrosse 
Masons, the world owes an incalculable debt. They 
laid “GREAT BASES FOR ETERNITY.” They were respon- 
sible for the rise of Elizabethan literature, the secret 
growth of high ideals to benefit humanity— midst 
great dangers and difficulties—the quiet dissemination 
of the Gospel of Brotherhood and carry in an 
Age of Fratricidal Strife, a 


238 








THE SHAKESPEARE SCROLL ON THE WESTMINSTER MONUMENT’ 





Reproduced from Secret Shakespearian Seals. 


‘The persons responsible for the Monument (presumably Pope) altered a passage 
from The Tempest, spelling several words differently, putting an apostrophe instead 
of "c" in "Towers" though there was ample space for the “ce,” and actually deleting 
ten words, 

This was done to make the letters count exactly 157. This proves the existence 
of “Fra Rosi Crosse” in the days of Pope. 

Note that Shakespeare’s finger points to the significant word “Temples.” 


Prare XV 
(See page 193) 




















THE ROYAL ARCH MASONIC JEWEL OF 1805 
WHICH CARRIES THE ROSICROSS SEAL OF 287 





Courteously supplied by H. Seymour, London. 


This illustration indicates the connection of the Royal Arch Degree with Fra 
Rosi Crosse, for it carries the Seal 287. It is very unlikely that this particular Jewel 
was numbered as a reference to the Chapter Stone of Friendship, Stockport, formed 
in 1793. It never has been customary to engrave a Chapter number on the Arch 
Jewel, nor is it done to-day. 

The hanging Basket was the Elizabethan Emblem signifying “a collection of 
things" "The Sun in the Centre was the Symbol for “God’s First Creature which 
was Light," the "Lux'^ of the Rosicrucians and the “All-Secing eve””—which Gilded 
the earth whereupon it gazeth (Sonnet xx—77)—of the Freemason. 

The modern Arch Jewel closely follows the above illustration, but it carries 
no number or date. On the circle and scroll is written in Latin two significant 
sentences: “If thou canst comprehend these things thou knowest enough," and 
“Nothing is wanting but the xev." 

The only English words on one side are placed upside-down along the base of 
the triangle above the English Letters which are set in the circle between "stops" 
thus: 

punog 3At M 
+ AL aD. 


It was a favourite Rosicrucian device to place words upside-down to call attention 
to those "in the Know" to look for something. “The object of upside-down 
printing was to reveal, to those deemed worthy of receiving it, some secret concerning 
the Founder," says an authority. The “Stop,” “Stop” on either side of the “ar 
ap’! are intended to make the reader pause and consider what they stand for, that 
they really spell . . . “A La,” so that the phrase actually runs, "We have found 
A LAD?’ The “Lad” of the Royal Arch Companions was obviously the same lad 
that began the Rosicrucian Fraternity according to the “Fama; and “the 
Extraordinary Youth’? that Bro. De Quincey declared began Freemasonry. 
(Freemasons and Rosicrucians.) 

‘There are numerical totals in the Jewel that definitely associate Shakespeare 
with the Royal Arch as the Founder by numerical signatures as well as the 287 
of "Fra Rosi Crosse." 


Pare XVI 


XI ý 


' "SO WORTHY A FELLOW AS WAS OUR 


SHAKESPEARE” 


“My Life hath in THIS LINE some interest, 
‘Which for memonrzat still with THEE shall stay. 


"The Worth of THAT is THAT which rr Contains, 
And That is This anp That with Thee remains.” 


SONNET LXXIV—I§O. 


i HE above lines are -taken from one of the 
Masonic Sonnets. ‘The last ones have never 
been understood by any commentator, for 

they are too enigmatical. It has never dawned upon 
anyone that this was a Masonic Sonnet and was written, 
as Masons would say, “on THE cENTRE.” The Author 
indicates it by the position of the word “anv” in the 
last line. “Anp” is the Key-note of the line, yet, from 
a purely literary view-point, it is meaningless. Masoni- 
cally, however, the Word is pregnant with Life. 
“And that is this—ann—this with thee remains.” It 
is the Mippiz word of the Line. In Masonic parlance 
it is the “centre” and the Sonnet is therefore written 
“ON THE CENTRE,” the mysterious place known to 
every Mason that stands for TRuTH, the invisible 
Reality behind all external Form, the unseen sour 
behind the scaffolding of Clay—nerves, sinew, muscle 
and bone. 

The truth behind the enigmatical phraseology of 

the lines is similar to the precedent ones. . . . “My 


239 
































SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Life hath in ruts LIne some Interest,” etc. Here we 
see that the Author was quite content to leave some- 
thing in one short line which he intended to remain 
quietly and for ever (i.e. “still’’) to serve as a “MEMORIAL” 
to perpetuate his memory after he had “passed 
away. 

No one has ever understood Shakespeare’s clever 
cunning in erecting a permanent Memorial, duly 
lettered, but which is invisible to the eyes of men who 
have not “Learned to READ.” He is here writing as 
the Founder of the Craft, as a Rosicrosse-Mason to 
other Rosicrosse-Masons who know what to look for 
and how to read. Through the line he has actually 
FELLED according to an Elizabethan Code a secret 
record which states: “Ií AM A MASTER MASON.” Writing 
as one Mason to another he thus lets it be known that 
his prime “INTEREST” was Masonic. . . . The Me- 
morial he sought was that of being secretly known 
aS a CONCEALED ETHICAL TEACHER, “This,” he says in 
effect, “shall sray with thee quietly and for ever." 

It is outside the scope of this work to explain the 
‘system of “Felling” and my Brethren must be content 
with my statement that I am quite as sure of my 
ground regarding this‘message as I am regarding the 
truth of the Masonic Images and Code examples in 
Love's Labours Lost and The Tempest. Shakespeare's 
Masonry was a consuming fire from youth to old age. 
It outpours itself in his early plays. It is left as a 
Memorial to mark his Literary Remains, his personal 
ashes, in the eventide of his life, so wonderfully por- 
trayed in lines which seem to be aquiver with approach- 
ing infirmity: 


"That Time of Year thou mayest in me behold 
When yellow leaves, or none, or few do hang 
Upon those Boughs which shake against the cold, 
Bare ruin’d Choirs where late the sweet birds 

sang. 
240 








CONCLUSION 


In mx thou see’st the twilight of such day 

As after sunset fadeth in the West 

Which by and by Black Night doth take away, 
Death’s Second Self that Seals up all in Rest.” 


(Sonnet 1xxmm—: 51.) 


In the Zyrica] utierances of Shakespeare as well as 
the dramatic we thus see that his mind constantly runs 
to the Ethical Symbolism of the Craft. 

It would be a waste of time to argue regarding the 
bona fides of the Masonic imagery he employs. The 
majority of the phrases are precise, definite, concrete. 
There are scores of expressions so pronouncedly 
Masonic that even a non-Mason can recognize the 
Emblems peculiar to the Royal Art. 

. They have necessarily been torn from their context 
but each illustration is perfect in itself, They could 
only havé been based on definite hidden knowledge 
consciously employed. That they were unconsciously 
written—in view of the precise Ritual Code Letters 
he uses so often in conjunction with such Masonic 
innuendoes—without premeditated presion is as un- 


‘thinkable an explanation as the theory that the world 


came into existence without the CREATIVE WORKMAN- , 
SHIP OF THE GREAT ARCHITECT. Marks of pzstGN— 
whether in the Plays, the Ritual, the Universe 

necessarily predicate a pzstGwzm. The Mind behind 

the plays like the Divine Mind behind the Universe 

can truthfully say to the Herd Mind or Mass 

Consciousness : : 


"As the Heavens are higher than the Earth, 
so are my Thoughts above your Thoughts and 
my Ways above your Ways.” 


Shakespeare’s Mind has a depth that no critic— 
especially mechanically-minded men of the Robertson- 


Q 241 




















SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Brandes-Lee School of thought—has ever plumbed. 
“Others abide our question: Thou art Free.” 

To my Masonic readers who are inclined to lay 
great store on the purely textual methods of the 
Schoolmen in solving the Genesis of the Craft, I would 
say: 

“Beware of whole-heartedly accepting the arbi- 
trary proof-standards of the ‘vulgar, uninstructed 
world’ whereby to fathom the Masonic Problem 

' of the Genesis, lest in so doing you cut yourselves 
off from your own rightful and peculiar Masonic 
Heritage, from your own Standards of Proof 
which have nothing in common with the so-called 
Staridards of Authority accepted by the world of 
non-Masons.” 


We cannot determine the Genesis Problem on 
purely academic lines alone. Masonic matters must 
be masonically discerned. Our standards of proof are 
standards peculiar to ourselves. We spell, we walk, 
we knock, we manipulate our hands, we wave our 
arms, we pat our stomachs, and by such SIGNS are we 
known to each other, by such proofs do-we enter into 


King Solomon's Temple. Even the academic certifi- 


cate is worthless as a lMasonic test or proof of 
proficiency. 


No amount of mere textual research can compensate ' 


for those rightful Masonic proofs which, in the nature 
of our Constitution, we have a right to expect from 
anyone who presumes to speak with authority regard- 
ing oricins or the Labours of the Worthy Brethren 
who were responsible for the Emergence of Free- 
masonry into the light of day in 1723. 

It must be remembered that we are not dealing with 
the establishment of a worldly organization, like the 
origin of some local Co-operative Society about which 
there is nothing to hide. We are dealing with the 
conception and birth of the world’s greatest Secret 


242 





CONCLUSION 


Society. Its early history is bound to be shrouded in 
mystery to the “cowan and intruder.” Yet not so 
shrouded that the “Discerning Brother” cannot pierce 
the veil. A Designed Brotherhood like Freemasonry 
must necessarily contain its own internal proofs of 
descent, framed on subtle lines of dissimulation, left 
by the Architect of the Order, that Brethren who 
wished to advance in Masonic Lore might read the 
Riddle of the Genesis aright. Those proofs may not 
commend themselves to the academics that are as much 
strangers to the “Masonic Knock” as to the “A.B.C. 
Code” of the Business Mart. But their rejection of 
Elizabethan methods, because they make a self- 
imposed modern standard the sole touchstone, does 
not alter the facts of the case—that Freemasons now 
hold irrefragable and monumental proofs, of Shake- 
speare's knowledge of Masonry . . . proofs which 
could be substantiated by the academic methods of the 
Universities, did space permit. 

One of the men who definitely knew the truth of 
the matter was that brilliant scholar and Mason, 
Thomas De Quincey. He knew that Shakespeare was 
the Founder of the Fraternity. He wrote a remarkable 
essay on “Freemasonry and the Rosicrucians" which 
has, naturally, been misunderstood by the scholars of 
"the uninstructed world," and also by certain Masons 
who think that only the precise methods which 
are in vogue in young ladies’ seminaries should 
be employed in the elucidation of the Genesis of the 
Fraternity, anything outside ''scissors and paste" 
research constituting “unhistorical claims and un- 
scientific pretensions.” 

The truth is that much which passes for “history” 
is false, and much that passes for “orthodox science” 

‘to-day is cast on the rubbish heap to-morrow, and he 
who would limit “proofs” to present-day customs is false 
to his Masonry—to what he learned at the Pedestal. 
Our real proofs are not scholastic. Our ancient 


243 



































SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


methods belong to a bygone age when all sorts of 
secrets were wrapped in the open text by numbers, 
anagrams, felling, etc., some examples of which have 

‘been exhibited. These were the methods employed 
by Bros. Anderson, Preston and Hutchinson, the 
THREE OFFICIAL HISTORIANS OF GRAND LODGE. To 
understand the Mystery we must understand the 
methods they employed to whisper their secrer under 
the Rose to future ages. : 

Bro. De Quincey employs a similar trick, using a 
number to denote whom he means in the following 
open passage where we get a clear hint that the Young 
Man Shakespeare was the Founder. 


` “To a Hoax played off by A YOUNG MAN of 
EXTRAORDINARY TALENTS in the beginning of the 
seventeenth century—about 1610—but for an 
elevated purpose .. . the whole Mysteries of 
Freemasonry are here distinctly traced” (p. 157). 


Bro. De Quincey does not tell the identity of the 
“extraordinary young man” openly. He talks instead 
about Fludd and Fludd’s “rriznp,” and then slips in 
a numerical Cypher which tells a Rosicrosse-Mason 
that De Quincey's Essay was inspired by‘ definite 
knowledge, written exactly two hundred years after 
the publication of the 1623 Folio. He does not tell 
us even what the “Hoax” was which was played. He 
leaves it to the "curious Brother" to realize that the 
“hoax” consisted in burying the story of the Genesis 
of the Craft in a Comedy of Laughter, Love's Labours 
Lost, through which the author still laughs at the 
world that has been taken in by the play. 

The same “young man” of De. Quincey was the 
“youth” of the Rosicrucians who, their Manifestoes 


declared, was the Founder of their Fraternity. Hecan . 


be identified with the “Lap” which the Royal Arch 
Masons had “Found”-—according to their Jewel— 


244 





CONCLUSION 


for Shakespeare was but a stripling when these various 
Orders were begun by him. 

Knowing the secret of Love’s Labours Lost, Bro. 
De Quincey writes: 


“Such is the power of a grand and capacious 
aspiration of Philosophic BEnEvoLence to EM- 
BALM even the idlest LEVITIES as amber 
enshrines straws and insects.” (Ibid., p. 157.) 


This exactly describes the Masonic asides and cus- 
toms to be found in the two plays, Love’s Labours Lost 
and The Tempest. Our Masonic Grwrsis has been 
embalmed for all time in “‘levities.” These secret things 
will be seen through to-morrow though the world be 
blind to-day. ` 


“Oh! Mighty Poet! Thy works are not as 
those of other men, simply and merely great works 
of Art; but are like the phenomena of nature, like 
the sun, the srars ... to be studied with 
entire submission of our own faculties, and in 
the perfect faith that in them there can be no too much 

. er too little, nothing useless or inert—but that the 
further we press in our piscovEriEs the more we 
shall see Proofs of DESIGN and sE.¥-suPPORTING 
ARRANGEMENT where the CARELESS EYE HAD SEEN 
NOTHING BUT ACCIDENT.” (The Knocking in 
Macbeth, Bro. De Quincey.) 


Note.—The Knocks in Macbeth were in 
“THREES.” | 
à 
There are many remarkable: asides in Bro. De 
: 5 7 ee 
Quincey’s Essay, but enough has been said to indicate 


. that Shakespeare was known to him to be par excellence 


an Ethical Teacher consciousiy (whatever else he 
may have been) and that this "Philanthropia" or 


245 























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


“Urge” for the Good of Mankind was an all-con- 
suming passion with him. ` 

The knowledge that Shakespeare was the Founder 
of an Ethical Fraternity necessarily gives us a different 
idea from the current one of the aims and ideals that 
stirred his soul. That he was in any sense altruistic, 
that he ever had a motive behind his work as a Play- 
wright, or that he ever regarded himself as an Ethical 
‘Teacher—regarding his plays as moral epics—is a 
view held by very few Shakespearian authorities, 
"They prefer to regard him with Voltaire as “a God- 
intoxicated genius,” an artist who was only concerned 
with Art, not Morals, the truth being that Art and 


Morality are one and the same, despite the Wildes . 


and Lawrences of to-day. 

In the new light of Love's Labours Lost and The 
Tempest the’ commentators of the future will have to 
take into consideration the supreme fact that Shake- 
speare’s URGE to produce, to create, was based on an 
ETHICAL IMPULSE, an altruistic Ideal, an overpowering 
passion to elevate the mental, moral and spiritual 
standards of humanity. 

He shouted at the ignorant masses of his day, the 
Calibans wherewith he was surrounded: 


“Ignorance is the Curse of God, 


Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to 
Heaven.” 


To the theological sectaries who were butchering 
each other in the name of the Master he bade them 
remember “the New Commandment that ye love one 
another." He called: 


“For Wisdom’s sake; for Love’s sake; for 
Men’s sake; for Women’s.sake let us once LosE 
OUR OATHS to FIND ourselves. . . . 


246 


ig i 





CONCLUSION 


It is RELIGION to be thus forsworn, - 
For cuarrry itself fulfils the Law 
And who can sever Love from cHartty.” 


It is because of this broad, ethical concept, its con- 
stant enunciation, his tolerance, charity, absence of 
specific theological teaching that commentators are 
still wondering what his real religious opinions were: 
whether he were a Catholic, a Protestant, an Agnostic, 
a Spiritualist, or a pure Secularist. We know now that 
the ruling passion‘ of his life was rrzEMasonry because 
it was founded on Love, and that he privately estab- 
lished an Ethical Brotherhood —ruz cRaFr OF CHARITY 
—to grow and spread through the Ages: hence the 
personal Sonnet-Note: I have LAID GREAT BASES FOR 
ETERNITY.” (cxxv—136.) 

Much more could be said, but “rr 1s coop To KNOW 
WHAT NOT TO SAY," said Bro. Anderson many years 
ago, and therefore it is better that “THE CURTAIN BE 
ALLOWED TO DROP," as Bro. De Quincey remarked, 
having thought he had said quite enough. 

It may be urged on purely a priori grounds by critics 
who do not want to regard Shakespeare as an Ethical 
Teacher and a Freemason that Freemasonry could not 
possibly have been conceived, and the first Lodge 
founded between the writing of Love’s Labours Lost 
in 1589 and the time when the Actor left Stratford 
for London, alleged to be in 1587. I reply—the fact 
is we do not yet know what genius can do and we do 
not know what Shakespeare did. What I know as a 
Mason is this, that Shakespeare was an Ethical 
Teacher, the Founder of the Craft; “Prospero 
the Prime, reputed for the LIBERAL arts without 
a Parallel, having both the Key of orricer and 
orrice” as "The W.M. of all the ma...” (The 
Tempest), and that the plays are saturated with Masonic 
Symbolism far more than with law phrases and legal 
customs, 


247 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


It is not for me—a simple researcher in the Mine of 
Truth—to explain away alleged anomalies which may 
be resolved quite easily were, we in full possession of 


all the facts of the period ; neither is it for me to explain ' 


directly how the Masonic nuggets came to be buried 
in the Shakespeare plays, any more than it is incum- 
bent for a mere digger with pick and shovel to explain 
scientifically how his treasure-trove came to be im- 
bedded in the earth’s crust. It is enough for me to 


have unearthed sufficient Masonic Jewels that I need. 


dig no more. I know there is sufficient left to make 
even an army of labourers rich beyond the dreams of 
avarice. The reader can discover the Truth for him- 
self. So I say, pointing to the 1623 Folio, “Go and 
do likewise.” 

It may be thought perhaps that I have spoken too 
freely of Masonic matters. At first sight this might 
appear`to be so, especially to-those Masons who are 
more concerned with the textual secrets of Masonry 
~i.e. the words, the knocks, the steps—than with the 
broad creative spirit in which Freemasonry is steeped, 
through which it was conceived, in which it lives and 
moves and has its being, and without which Free- 
masonry would be a dead and a lifeless thing. ‘The 
principles of Freemasonry are indeed sacrosanct and 
eternal, but the mere marks by which we are known 
are trivial, ephemeral, of the earth, earthy, and will 
pass into the nothingness of things. 

` Moreover, if I have spoken freely of these matters 
I have not done so of my own initiative. I have created 
nothing; I have said nothing; I have disclosed nothing 
except what is to be found a thousand thousand times 
over in cold print already, written originally by the 
hand of the Supreme Genius of the Ages, wittiam 
SHAKESPEARE, the Father of the Fraternity. uz wrote 


these things. He disclosed these secrets. He left them . 


to be discovered. 1 rounp THEM and more things 
beside. I merely pornr to my little store of new-found 


248 


oe 





CONCLUSION 


wealth and I say to the world in general and to the 
Craft in particular: 


“There you are! Look! I have Sought and I . 
have rounp! Here is ucut on the Genesis of 
the Brotherhood! Proof palpable of the Free- 
masonry of Shakespeare!" 


I have a right so to point; a right to enlighten the 
Brethren on the prime fundamental of the Order 
when so much clotted nonsense is being poured out 
by acrid critics and pseudo-historians who carelessly 
mix their facts with their opinions to the confusion 
of the average reader. I have the right of a FREE MAN 
whose lips were never padlocked so that they might 
not utter the TRUTH in a world where ERROR reigns” 
regarding the Personality of the Founder; a Free Man 
who was enjoined to make a daily advancement in 
Masonic Knowledge. Moreover, the special informa- 
tion that was civen to me—the Map, so to speak— 
that led me to the Quest, was not given me under 
VoW or szAL. Indeed, it was an obligation imposed 
upon me—-I felt it to be so in my heart of hearts— 
to make the matter known after I had checked the 
communications Ay the usual methods of academic research 
. +. for the Author had written, “ser mz FREE.” 

Bros. Anderson, Preston, Hutchinson and De 
Quincey never told the matter OPENLY in their works . 


„because they knew the Founder had left all the 


necessary information regarding the Genesis in the 
Plays and Sonnets. It was no business of theirs to 
make a premature disclosure. ‘They had entered into 
their Rosicrosse knowledge by obligation and vow 
and could not take the gag from their mouths. Even 
in Bro. De Quincey’s day, the time was not ripe. 
I am free to say at last that “Shakespeare was the 
FOUNDER of the FRATERNITY.” 

This may be disputed by some Masonic scholars 
who hold high Degrees in the Order. Their denials 


249 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


will not be the result of any esoteric knowledge learned 
in the course of their Masonic duties. They will 
merely voice their own opinions, and such opinions 
can carry no weight in view of the facts herein adduced. 
There is no Mason in the world dare deny OFFICIALLY 
that SHAKESPEARE WAS THE FATHER AND. 
FOUNDER OF THE CRAFT IN ENGLAND. In 
view of the fact that the first rureE orricraL Historians 
of Grand Lodge leave the name of the Founder 
secretly written in their works—Bro. Anderson’s 
particularly being passed with the assistance of 
the “Learned Brethren” (Rosicrosse-Masons)—THE 
UNITED GRAND LODGE OF ENGLAND CANNOT DENY 
THE TRUTH OF SHAKESPEARE'S MASONRY. He was THE 
FIRST GRANDMASTER of the Order. 


I have partially completed the task laid upon me . 


to discharge. I have discovered to the world a small 
but powerful literary Brotherhood—“rHe GRAND 
possgssors” who once -held (and may still hold) the 
Shakespeare Manusctipts whose disappearance is one 
-of the Mysteries of the Elizabethan era . . . who 
were “‘GaccED” openly and had to work in secret in 
order to spread their educational and spiritual ideals— 
a little band of Freemasons to whom the world owes 
an incalculable debt, who had passed unknown and 
forgotten. I have revealed the supreme genius 
“William Shakespeare” as the Founder of Free- 
masonry . . . a great Ethical Teacher with an urge 
for God and Goodness. I have vindicated the greatness 
of Bros. Anderson, Desaguliers, Preston, Hutchinson, 
who, with the members: of their respective Grand 
Lodges, played a Worthy and Immortal part in the 
great and imperishable Emergence of 1723—our 
Ancient Brethren who knew the Founder and in their 
Works left a secret record' of the AuTHOR. 


And so may all Good Men and True stand 
by the FATHERS OF THE CRAFT . . . our Ancient 


250 





CONCLUSION 


Rulers Supreme and Subordinate: And by the 
Masonic Candles lit by Bros. Anderson, 
Desaguliers, Payne and the “Learned Brethren” 
who Examined and passen the 1723 Book of 
Constitutions: For the Ancient Light still 
Shineth in Modern Darkness and the Darkness 
comprehendeth it not. 


“so MOT. YT BE.” 
Atrrep Dopp. 


251 





NOTES 


Tue First “Worray Frtiow.” 


"The First Person to be openly described in print as a Member 
of the Fraternity was William Shakespeare. In the 1623 
Great Folio of Plays, the Editors describe him as a “Worthy 
Fellow.” 


‘Tue Sten or THE Master. 


In the prefatory pages of the same Work, the Editors 
associate his name with the Sign of the Square, for above his 
name they print “SEVEN SET SQUARES.” 

Among Masons “Seven” is the perfect number. The 
initiate is told in his first instruction at the Pedestal that “au. 
SQUARES . . . are true and proper stens to know a Mason 
by.” When associated with a particular person, it is “THE 
SIGN OF THE MASTER that Rules by the Square.” 


THE DEATH or THE OPERATIVE CRAFT. 


Owing to Government fears of rebellion among the labouring 
classes for higher wages and shorter working hours (Wat 
Tyler and Jack Cade rebellions, etc.), the gilds of the labourers 
were destroyed by successive Parliament Acts. 

In 1360, “Congregations, Chapters, REGULATIONS and OATHS 
(‘Regulations’ such as the Cooke MS. which has never yet 
been proved to be a historic contemporary document of 1450 
faithfully recording contemporary customs) WERE FORBIDDEN, 
the ordinance being renewed and stringently enforced. ‘The 
Law seems to have regarded them as assembling merely for 
the purpose of obtaining an increase in their wages.” (Hist. 
ef F.M., p. 79, Findel.) 

In 1425 an Act was passed that “Masons shall not congregate 
in Chapters of Congregations... . . At the special request of 
the Commons we ordain and establish that such Chapters and 


252 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


congregations shall not thereafter be holden. . . . They that 
cause such to be holden . . . shall be judged for Felons . . . 
punished by imprisonment of their bodies and make fine and 
ransome." 

""This Act put an end to this Body and all its illegal Chapters 
and pretences.” (G. Pownall, quoted by Gould, Hist, F.M., 
Vol. I, p. 353.) 

“1424 is the proper date to assign for the cessation of English 
Freemasonry as a strictly operative association.” (Early Hist. 
of F.M., Fort.) 

There was a further Act making the labourer still more 
directly under the heel of the State in 1495. 

"These Acts were never repealed and when Queen Elizabeth 
ascended the Throne all the repressive acts were reaffirmed 
(Findel, p. 80), the celebrated Statute of Elizabeth (5 Eliza., 
cap. 4) being specially directed against any type of union or 
combination between the Workers. (State and its relation to 
Labour, pp. 34-36, S. Jevons.) 


Tue REBELLIOUS Masons. 


“The Masons of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries must 
have been very factious and rebellious, as we may learn from 
the Statutes of Parliament being always renewed from time 
to time.” (4.Q.C., Vol. 38, Dr. Begemann.) 


THE OPERATIVES AND WAGES. 


“In the fifteenth century congregations and confederacies 
were jealously watched and forbidden. . . . Carpenters, 
masons, plasterers, daubers, tilers and paviors had to take 
whatever wages the law decreed.” (Hist. F.M., pP. 170, 
Gould.) E 

“On the 28th April, 1610, the justices. of the peace 
established the following legal schedule: ; 


with with- 

A freemason which can draw his plot and set meat — eut 
accord 8[- 12[- 
A rough mason who can take charge over others. 5/- — 1o [- 
A bricklayer 4j- 8j- 
Apprentice : 3l- 74- 


253 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


“In 1689 the wages of freemasons were prescribed to be 
1/4 per diem. ‘To receive more was to subject them to 21 days 
imprisonment.” (Hist. F.M., pp. 130-1, Fort.) 


Masons anp Dauszers. 


“Masons were classed with carpenters, plasterers, tilers and 
all manner of labourers in 1350, and with carpenters, tilers, 
thatchers, daubers and all other labourers in 1425.” (Story of 
Craft, p. 29, L. Vibert.) 


No Srzcrar PniviLEGES. 


"No evidence is forthcoming from the Statutes of the 
Realm that the Freemasons as a Fraternity or Gild af any 


period possessed or held any patent whatever." (Hist. F.M., ` 


p. 171, Gould.) 


Dip GzwrLzMEN jorn Oprrative Lonces? 


“We cannot believe at that period, 1389, amateurs could 
have been present as accepted masons or as honorary members. 
Patrons were nominated by the King to superintend the 
erection of buildings but they certainly had no knowledge of 
the Craft.” (Findel, p. 77.) 


'Tuz MzncuawT Grup AND THE CnarT GipD. — | 


“The Masters developed into an employing class and the 
fellows into a class of workers by the day. As the gulf widened 
the masters used the machinery of the gild for their own 
aggrandisement. To resist them the. journeymen ... . began 
organising gilds on their own. This was bitterly opposed by 
the masters who invoked the civil law to stop the practice.” 
(Hist. F.M., p. 179, H. L. Haywood and J. Ebury.) 

(By the modernist, freemasonry is supposed to have begun 
in ordinary working craft lodges . . . not the merchant gild. 
It was this labouring craft that was stamped out by the various 
enactments.)- i 


''HE ANNUAL ÁssEMBLY OF OPERATIVES. 


"Is there anything in the fabric of English law which will 
form some foundation in racr for the references that are made 


254 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


in the ‘Regius Poem’ and the ‘Cooke MS.’ to an Assembly? 
- +. That there was an annual assembly that all labourers and 
artificers were bound to attend is INCREDIBLE . . . not one 
record of the circumstances descending to us.” (His. F.M., 
pP. 152—154, Gould.) 


‘Tue Orznarivs LzcgNbp: A FABRICATION. 


“The History contained in the MS. Constitutions (Le. the 
Legend of the operative Old Charges) was . . . a sketch of 
a PRETENDED HISTORY of Masonry FABRICATED BY LEARNED 
MEN.” (4.Q.C., Vol. 38, Dr. Begemann.) 

“I cannot bring myself to believe that the masons who plied 
their trade in remote villages and hamlets at about the early 
part of the fifteenth century, were either by education or 
intelligence capable of comprehending the Halliwell Poem 
(i.e. the Regius Poem) had it been related to them.” (Hist. 
F.M., Vol. I, p. 360, Gould.) 

It is abundantly clear that the Regius and the Cooke cannot 
be accepted as descriptive of historical practices of the fourteenth 
century. : 

They were fabricated just as the Song of Beowulf or the 
story of Job. They are feigned histories, written in the 
Elizabethan era to serve as connecting links with the operative 
craft —"the quillets and authorities” that the Author of Love’s 
Labours Lost said he would write. 


PHILOSOPHIC ŜYMBOLISM AND ILLITERATE LABOURERS. 


“Philosophic recondite Symbolism never originated among 
the manual-labouring, illiterate masons of Scotland and 
England. ‘They had no use for nor would they have understood 
and comprehended. such symbols or the doctrines concealed 
in them. . . . There could have been nothing in the com- 
panionship of illiterate day labourers to attract such men . . . 
(types of Gentlemen known to be attached to such Lodges) in 
York, Lancashire or London.” (Syn. M., p. 68, Albert Pike, 
quoted by Armstrong.) : 

It is surely self-evident that “recondite symbolism’ of such 
infinite variety could only have been conceived by one who 
had the mind of a Poet and could only have been welcomed by 
men of culture. It could only have arisen in the Elizabethan 


255 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Era round the mind of the greatest Poet. Shakespeare and the 
alwyers of Gray’s Inn with whom the cult started had nothing 
to do at all with the operatives. Their gild had been non- 
existent for more than a century. : 


Tue Recrus POEM AND ANTIQUITY. 


“The Regius MS. contains a set of rules and regulations 
for the Government of what was obviously a gild of craftsmen. 
- A PATENT ATTEMPT ‘TO ACCOUNT FOR AN ANTIQUITY 


of that institution. . . . In some manner this particular MS. 
was jest for some 450 years.” (Hist. of F.M., pp. 181-2, 
Haywood and Ebury.) 


It was “mane” in one of the Elizabethan scriveneries of the 
Rosicrosse Masons. It was lost for some length of time because 
it was in hiding with the “crawp posszssors” who have 
other MSS. even more important . . . handed down “by 
Succession." : 


< Tue ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN 1440. ` 


“In the time of Henry VI, the lot of artificers appears to 
have been a hard one. In 1440 Warrents from the King were 
sent to the Wardens of Masonrie and Carpenters at Eton. 


‘y evying thayne powair to take, in what place so ever 
hit be, almanere of workmen, labourers and cariage as 
shal seme necessarie or behoveful inthaire craftes to yhe 
edifacacon of oure college of eton.' ”? 


(Apron Men, p. 35, Blackham.) 


‘The above specimen is quite sufficient to show that the 


Modern Ritual never evolved out of operative customs. When . 


the cultured scribes of Kings used such a cribbed style the 
language of the common workers must have been infinitely 
more barbarous. Ethical symbolism in such days is incredible. 


ILLITERATE OPERATIVES. 


“They (the operatives) specially had need of a secret system 
of recognition that an ILLITERATE MAN could use to satisfy 
another as ILLITERATE.” (Freemasonry, p. 33, L. Vibert.) 


256 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


Tue Bectnninc or Mopzrn Encusu. 

“Spenser marks a beginning of English literature, . . . In 
Spenser as in Hooker . . . these tentative essays were the 
necessary exercises by which Englishmen were . . . learning 
TO WRITE. . . . "Then the splendid Elizabethan Drama, that 
form of art that has nowhere a rival, the highest powers of 
poetic imagination.” (Spenser, PP- 2-3, R. W. Church.) 


ÁNAGRAMS. 


The art of spelling out a word or words by the inrrran 
CAPITAL LETTERS was known to the Copyist of “The Newcastle 
Roll,” one of the Old Charges. 


‘Tue Newcastre Coutzce Rou 


An Anagram upon ye name of Masonrie. Richard 
Stead to-his friend Joseph Clau ghton upon his Art of 
Masonrie as followeth. . 

Much might be said of the Noble Art, 

A Craft yts worth esteeming in each part, 
Sundry Master, nobles and their Kings also, 
O how they sought its worth to know. 
Nimrod and Solomon ye wisest of men 
Reasoned to know this Science then. 

I'll say no more least by my shaking rhyme I 
Endeavouring to praise shall blame Masonrie. 


BHON p y 


. Findel says there is an Anagram mentioned in the York MS. 
(Old Charge) and that he has endeavoured to discover it, but 
failed. 

The Newcastle Roll was written about 1700 and is an 
exact follow-on of the methods employed in Love’s Labours 
Lost and The Tempest. 


Tar FATHER OF THE (SO-CALLED) OPERATIVE CHARGES. 
“The OLD CHARGES seem to have played the part ofa Warrant 

without which no Lodge was held. All the known copies have 

descended from ONE ORIGINAL although transmitted by several 


channels." (The Antiquity of the Third Degree, G. W. 
Bullamore.) : Í 


R 257 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Tue Nınery Orp CHARGES. 

“The ‘Old Charges’ is a popular name given to some ninety 
or so MSS. of a masonic nature to which attention was drawn 
Some sixty years ago. . . . 

“They are in various forms, some on parchment and some 
onpaper . . . bookform . . . rolls . . . afew havesurvived 
only by being printed and the originals are now lost.” (The 
Old Charges, p. 8, H. Poole.) 


Masonic LANGUAGE IN THE Forro. 

The greater part of the Masonic language in the Folio will 
have been used—(owing to the tremendous vocabulary of 
Shakespeare and the fact that he largely fixed the language)— 
for the first time in print, such as “I have ever SQUARED me to 
thy Counsel,” “I say, my FOOT my Tutor.” “Lets PART 
the Word? No! TÅ not be your HALEP etc. 

This is a very important point to consider. If Freemasonry 
was made in 1717, the creator must have known his “Shake- 
speare” through and through, with all its subtle innuendoes 
which no one has ever yet seen and given to the world. 


Tue Orricta, HISTORIANS. 

"The works of Bros. Anderson (The Constitutions), Preston 
(The Illustrations of Masonry), and Hutchinson (The Spirit of 
Masonry), obviously stand in a very different category from 
those of present-day writers. . 

‘These first three historians had their works officially sponsored 
by the respective Grand Lodges of their day. ‘They therefore 
speak with authority on all matters. What they write in 
SECRETLY is with the sanction of GRAND LODGE. 

-Writers like Bros. Findel, Gould, Waite, Vibert, etc. 
know nothing of the secret of the Emergence and therefore 
can tell us nothing save their opinions. . . . The official 
historians not only knew the secret, but also knew how to 
transmit it to future generations who wished to be acquainted 
with the truth. 


“Te Honour or Dr. ANDERSON. 


“Dr. Anderson and Dr. Desaguliers were honest men doing 
a work which they believed to be good or . . , the most 


258 


NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE . 


consummate rascals. Looking at their characters it is impossible 
to doubt their thorough integrity. . . . 

“If they and their associates were guilty of imposture, would 
it not at once have been detected and exposed? . ... 

“The rapidity with which it spread makes it all the more 
difficult to imagine that this resulted from the inventive genius 
of Drs. Desaguliers and Anderson. Ir is incredible that they 
INVENTED and Introduced the System. 

“It is in the Highest Degree probable that they found, 45 
THEY SAID, a System already existing which they deemed 
it worthy of their utmost exertions to extend.” (Origin of F.M., 
P- 39, C. I. Paton.) 

Is it not manifest that the System was indeed handed to them 
having travelled down the years from SHAKESPEARE? 


Was WILLIAM PRESTON CREDULOUS, ETC.? 


“Rev. Bro. Woodford says of Preston that he may well be 
called the Father of Masonic History and his Work will 
always be a standard Work for Masons. He was a painstaking 
and accurate writer. Though we have access to MSS. he 
never saw, yet, on the whole, his original view of Masonic 
History remains correct.” (Cy., p. 566, Kennings.) 


PHILOSOPHERS AND THE GENESIS. 
Bro. Gould suggests that “A set of Philosophers of the 


seventeenth century may have ransacked antiquity in order 
to discover a Model for their newly-born Freemasonry.” 
(Quoted by L. Vibert, Freemasonry, p. 120.) 

Bro. Gould was nearly right: But there was only ong 
PHILOSOPHER and he was also a rorr and a DRAMATIST. He 
lived in the latter part of the sixteenth century. The men who 
helped him in launching the Craft were the Law Students 
from Gray’s Inn. It is all to be found in Love’s Labours Lost, 
which in 1597 was played before Queen Elizabeth. 

Green the Historian draws a wonderful picture in order 
to bring home the facts to the imagination of the reader: 


“In Love’s Labours Lost, the young Playwright fresh 
from his own Stratford, flings himself into the midst of 
the brilliant England which gathered round Elizabeth 


259 














SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


with the HUMOURS, QUIXOTISMS, WIT AND WHIM which 
veiled its inner nobleness!” (Hist. Eng., Vol. III, p. 4.23.) 
Its “inner nobleness” was Masonic. 


ORGANIZED CRAFT OPERATIVES. 


“In spite of efforts which have been made to show that 
operative masonry was one big Fraternity, as Modern Free- 
masonry is, the evidence weighs overwhelmingly against that 
theory. 

“Through the enactments . . . which made it unlawful 
for a worker to ask or to receive more than the most miserly 
pittance . . . the pay of a master mason in FREE STONE was 
FOURPENCE a DAY which began at pawn and lasted until 
nightfall. . . . Each new enactment weighed more heavily 
upon the craftsmen until the trend of adverse legislation 
culminated in the 1425 Act.” (Hist. of F.M., Hayward and 
Ebury.) 


Tue Breve AND THE Riruat. 


“The Geneva Bible was the Bible of England from 1560 
till late in the seventeenth century. . . . It gives for Boaz 
‘In strength,’ and for Jachin “To establish’ or ‘Stability... . 
It mistranslates both these words. Boaz means ‘In him is 
strength,’ and Jachin ‘He will establish.’ 

“Another mistranslation . .. is the meaning given to 
‘Tubal Cain, ‘Worldly possessions,’ when it means Tubal the 
smith. It gives for Shibboleth the fall of waters or an ear of 
corn . . . more correctly it is a stream of water. . . . 'The 
men of Gilead put the test to the Ephraimites when they were 
standing beside a Shibboleth, a swiftly flowing stream." 
(Freemasonry, p. x31, L. Vibert.) 

‘The writer of the Ritual was therefore familiar with the 
Geneva Bible. So, too, was Shakespeare. His Bible quotations 
in the plays prove that he was thoroughly steeped in this edition. 


‘Tue Bisre i Frupat Times. 
“In 1290 the price of a fairly written Bible was £37, the 
hire of a labourer being then 13d. a day. . . . : 
“Wyclif’s translation was about 1380, but only the New 
‘Testament was ever printed. A copy brought £40. 


260 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


“The first printed English Bible was W. T. Tyndale in 
1526. In 1529 the edition was bought up and burnt. He was 
strangled and burnt in 1536. 

“In 1540 a copy of Tyndale’s Bible was required by law 
to be put in every parish church, but, later the’ Papist power 
succeeded in suppressing it. It was restored again about 1570.” 
(Bible Dic., p. 205, Beeton.) 

It is quite clear that there was no access to the Bible by the 
common class prior to the days of Elizabeth. Even if they had 
had access, the people were illiterate. ‘There was no education 
and no English books printed. "The manners and customs of 
the lower class were naturally vulgar in the extreme. To regard 
the medieval labouring masons of England as “syMBOL LOVING 
OPERATIVES" is sheer credulity. They had neither time nor 
inclination to worry about recondite symbolism after working 
from “dawn to sunset for the miserly pittance of fourpence a 
day” under wretched housing and social conditions, 

Freemasonry never started either among operatives or in 
operative lodges any more than it began in the “Apple Tree 
"Tavern," a “1717 Grand Lodge” of literary nondescripts, or 
Dr. Anderson’s study. 

It could only have been created in the Elizabethan Era . . . 


‘by one man. The unity and literary characteristics of the 


Ritual proclaim him to be wILLIAM SHAKESPEARE who was 
primarily AN ETHICAL TEACHER rather than an ARTIST, the 
leading motif behind each play being an Ethical one. 


‘Tue Ansence oF Encusn Books. 


“In the catalogue of the library of Sir Thomas Smith, 1566, 
of one thousand books, only five were written in the English 
language. In Francis Bacon’s youth there were few books 
which made any pretensions to literature. Elliot’s The Governor, 
Ascham’s Schoolmaster and Wright’s drt of Rhetoric almost 
exhaust the list.” (Smedley.) 


Eneuiso in rHE Days or Queen Exizaseru. . 

Referring to the early days of Queen Elizabeth, I. Donnelly 
writes: “The English-speaking population of the world was 
confined to Britain. Refinement and culture scarcely extended 
beyond a few towns. . . . The agricultural population was 


261 





SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


Steeped to the lips in ignorance, rude and barbarous in their 
manners and brutal in their modes of life.” (The Great 
Cryptogram, Vol. 1, p. 27.) 


Tue Country Drazecrs. 


“So pronounced were the different prALEcrs that it was hard 
to catch the. words of commanp” (i.e. when the different 
Counties were being organized to resist the Spaniards at the 
time of the invasion). (The English of Shakespeare, p. 83, 
Goadby.) I 


SCHOOLING in THE Days or SHAKESPEARE. 


“The common people were densely ignorant. They had to 
pick up their ‘mother tongue as best they could . . . Schooling 
was impossible. For the many, BOOKS did not exist. The 
Horn Book for teaching the Alphabet would almost exhaust 
the resources of any schools that might exist. Little if any 
English was taught in the lower classes of the Grammar 
school.” (Ibid., Goadby.) 

As a rule there was no educated person in the parish beyond 
the parson. “It is therefore farcical to suggest that in previous 
decades—when a deeper night of gross darkness covered the 
people—the ‘‘Regius Poem” or the “Cooke MS.” could 
possibly have been gravely recited by a class of illiterate work- 
men in their “lodges(!)” after their working hours, worn out 
with out-door toil, in an era when English reading and writing 
were virtually unknown even among the ruling classes . . . 
the “Gentlemen,” 

“In Elizabethan days, apart from the University little culture 
could be found. The agricultural classes were densely ignorant, 
brutal in their manners, and incredibly filthy in their habits." 
(B. G: Theobald, B.A.) 

“To be able to read and write outside of professed scholars 
and men and women of rank was an accomplishment still valued 
as a rarity.” (Dr. Samuel Johnson.) 


Icnorance oF Tae Masses ar rue Time or Hen, VIII. 
“In the reign of Hen. VIII the great body of the people 
were as yet in the most profound ignorance, removed as far as 
262 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


the cattle of the fields from any knowledge of books or letters." ^ 
(Hist. of Eng., Vol. IT, p. 379, Martin.) E. 


Tue Lasourine CLASS AT THE TIME OF THE EMERGEKCE, 


Writing of the 1702—14 era (virtually the time of the 
Emergence of the Freemasons) the same historian says: “The 
education of the lower classes was neglected on principle. . . . 


© Low pleasures were still the natural results of the ignorance that 


still prevailed among the English peasantry. It was believed 
even by the greatest writers that to educate the bulk of the 
people was to destroy the distinctions of rank. They... were 
unable to divert or instruct themselves with reading.” (Vol. 
Hl, p. 353) ` 


Tue Masszs IN 1789. 


"In 1789 rude manners and coarse amusements still pre- 
vailed among the lower classes. Little or no provision was made 
for their education. . . . The low pitch of moral refinement 
among the wealthy class as well as among the lower order is 
indicated by their sharing in demoralizing pastimes. There were 
few readers and few books in the humbler walks of life. The 
unlettered classes in town and country were addicted to diver- 
sions like cock and dog fights." (Ibid., Vol. III, P. 653.) 


ANAGRAMS AND ERRATA, ETC. 


Cyphers, Anagrams, Echo Verses, Watermarks, Hiero- 
glyphics, Pictoral Emblems, Cyphers of all kinds were once as 
fashionable in England as the modern craze for Crossword and 
Picture puzzles. ' 

“Deep Mysteries were conjectured to be veiled by them. . . . 

“The mechanical critic who. speaks contemptuously of the 
taste of another age by those of his own day, and whose knowledge 
of the NATIONAL LITERATURE (i.e. the Plays of the 
National Poet) does not extend beyond his own century is neither 
historian nor critic. 

“The rruru is that Anagrams and the like were at one time 
the fashionable amusement of the wittiest and the most learned." 
(Curiosities of Literature, D'Isracli.) 


263: 











SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


THE “GENTLEMAN.” 


(To-day) “every well-dressed, well-behaved man is ‘a 
Gentleman,’ but in England in the sixteenth century it meant 
a great deal more. It signified a man oF GENTLE BLOOD. A 
GREAT and IMPASSABLE GULF lay between ‘the Quality,’ ‘the 
Gentry,’ the “Hereditary Upper Class’ and the common herd who 
toiled for a living. . . . "The distinction in the England of 1 596 
between the Yeoman and the *Gentleman was almost as wide 
as the difference to-day (1888) in America between the white 
man and the black man.? (Donnelly, p. 55, Vol. I.) 


DID EVER ILLITERATE LODGES ADMIT “GENTLEMEN?” 


In view of the historic facts—the poverty of the masons, ` 


their illiteracy, their pariah-like social standing, the disdain of 
the “Upper Classes” for the “Common Herd,” their brutal 
pursuits, their coarse habits—the fact that the gild of masons 
and daubers was stamped out by Parliament Edicts—it is 
farcical to suppose that such masons kindly consented to admit 
“Gentlemen” to their meetings! Only a very credulous 


historian could possibly say: “Nevertheless, they continued to 


meet and to admit other persons (Gentlemen) as members. s 
They read the Old Charges . . . which they were at pains to 
transcribe from time to time.” They certainly never did prior 
to the Parliament Acts, and they could not have done so after- 
wards. ‘They were uurrerate. There is no evidence any- 
where that Gentlemen joined such lodges. 


Lonpon anp York Masonry. 


Bro. ‘Henry Sadler says: “I am fully convinced that at this 
period the Leaders of the Rival Grand Lodges really knew very 
little of each others’ origin and antecedents.” (Hist. F.M., 


P- 338, Gould.) 


‘Tue Risz or Masonry rN ENGLAND. 


*"The Modern Masonic Order can be traced to the period of 
European History famous for its intrigues both political and. 
sociological. Between the years 1600 and 1800 mysterious 
agents moved across the face of the Continent. The fore- 


264. 











NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


runner of Modern "Thought was beginning to make its 
appearance." (Lectures on the Ancient Philosophies, Manley 
Hall. 


“Our own feeling is that Freemasonry was founded in 
England about 1600, or it may have been a few years earlier 
and was the outcome of a combination of men of social position 
and intellectual acquirements, . . ." (The Masonic Record, 
p. 116, J. Stevens.) 

“That Freemasonry existed in a Speculative Form before 
1493 is nota fact capable of specific proof.” (His. F.M., p. 117, 
Findel.) 

“Every unprejudiced inquirer will admit that in all proba~ 
bility English F reemasonry in ifs present state was not intro- 
duced before the close of the sixteenth century.” (Early Hist. 
F.M. J. O. Halliwell) ` 


Encranp tHe Home oF THE Hicuer Decress. 


“The derivation of the Higher Grades . . . which had come to 
form part of the Craft System prior to 4.D. 1700. . . . Eng- 
land has as good a claim as any other country to the Ancient 
Possession of a System of Higher Grade F reemasonry, and those 
nations which received Craft Masonry from the Grand Lodge 
of England sooner or later imported the Higher Degrees which 
England possessed prior to 1717... . ; 

“The best proof of this is an edition of Long Livers, dedi- 
cated by Eugenius Philalethes, Jr., in 1721, where THE HIGHER 
DEGREES OF MASONRY ARE ALLUDED TO IN EXPRESS TERMS. 

“My object is to dispose of the repeated allegation that we 
derive our Higher Grades in the first instance from F. rance, 
the fact being the reverse.” (Speculative Freemasonry, pp. 2-4, 
John Yarker.) . a 

"This important declaration by Bro. Yarker in 1883 is 
absolutely confirmed by the fact that such Degrees are indicated 
quite clearly in the Shakespeare Folio. 

The facts disclosed in the Folio more than confound those 
who have declared that Bro. Yarker was “a man of confused 
mind ‘with bees in his bonnet, etc., who often stultified his 
readers.” ‘The stultification is with the cock-sure critics whose 
a priori dogmatism on vital issues is now proved to be worthless 
in the light of Shakespeare’s Masonry. ] 


265 


Sect cse emis 








t 


SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


"Tur EnmaBETHAN "Hap-v-wysrg." 
In the "Regius Poem" is the word **Had-y-wyste," which 
is an exclamation of those who repented of anything inadver- 
_ tently performed. This expression is very common in Elizabethan 
“ writers. (See appendix of the “Regius Poem” reprint, J. O. 
Halliwell.) 
This in itself is sufficient to give a clue to the real date when 
the “Regius Poem” was written. 


ELIZABETHAN SCRIVENERIES. 


In Elizabethan days there were professional scriveners who 
copied Manuscripts for clients. They were much in use by 
the Playhouses to copy the various parts for the Players from the 
original MS. of the author. ute 

When a MS. was sold to any of the "Theatre Companies 
Copies were made for the actors by these professional men. 
Milton’s father was a scrivener. ‘There was a Scrivener’s 
Company of this kind which held a rigorous monopoly within 
the jurisdiction of the City of London. 

There was also a famous private scrivenery in that era to 

which was attached John Davies of Hereford, “a professional 
scrivener and the most skilful penman of his time.” He copied 
documents for various employers and gave instruction in the art 
of penmanship.  . 
_ “By the industry of Mr. T. le Marchant Douse, his (Davies) 
handwriting has been identified on the famous ‘Northumber- 
land ‘Manuscript’ found in 1867 in Northumberland House, 
Charing Cross, on the cover of which is scribbled over and over 
again ‘William Shakespeare.’ ” 

It is ‘believed that some of the actual Manuscripts of the 
Plays once lay between the covers. 

On the top right-hand corner are certain ROsICRUCIAN 
SYMBOLS, one emblem being the “Hand Glass of Pallas Athena,” 
which immediately associates the name of Shakespeare with the 
Mysteries and the Rosicrucian movement with which he was 
connected. There can be no possible doubt that Shakespeare 
had such a secret scrivenery that assisted him in his work, hinted 
at in Troilus and Cressida as the “GRAND PossEssors.” Speak- 
ing to himself in the Sonnets he calls them his “compzers BY 
NIGHT GIVING HIM AID," and elsewhere, speaking in his own 


266 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


person, he says, “MY STAFFE UNDERSTAND ME,” a 
very clear 

statement that can only be understood on the lines of a literary 
school of which Shakespeare was the Editorial Head. 
i b know that at least one famous contemporary Elizabethan 

a | such 8 private scrivenery which he called his "coop PENS,” 
which included such names as Ben Jonson, T. Hobbes Thomas 
mehel, Peter Boener, Sir Jobn Davies, etc. : 

aKespeare ran such a Scrivenery, who were memb 

of his secret Society. His output of literature cannot de 
accounted for on any other Brounds. One pair of hands could 
not TONS have accomplished all the incidental mechanical 
work in writing'and preparing for the Press as well as following 
his private avocation whereby he had to live, 

The Counting of letters and words especially must have taken 
a considerable amount of time as well as marking the “proofs” 


sworn to secrecy. This alone explains much is eni i 
s : that i 
in the Elizabethan era, eae 

It would have been an easy matter for such a School of 


“Good Pens” to have turned out th i i 
Poem (thus antedating it by i ) eo dM 


of the “Cooke MS” Legend thus forming th 

xe of the so-called “Old Charges” Mis Ori AE 
served as “warrants” in the Speculative Lodges of th - 

on century onwards, Iż is very si innt shat the earliest 
t Charge," the “Grand Lodge MS,” belongs to the Eliza- 
ethan era, 25th Dec., 1583. The “Cooke” and the “Regius” 

both undated unquestionably belong to the same age. I 


FREEMASONRY AND THE SrraTroRD MEMORIAL, 
_ The direct connection betw. 
is evidenced by the fact that wl 
ial Theatre in Jul 

ceremony was performed with full Masonic al iy ce 
England, six hundred Masons being present in full regalia, 


Lord Ampthill used ld Egypti: 
A oua nt — oid Egyptian Maul used at Sakhara 


In 1877 when the former Theatre was about to be built the 
267 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


same Masonic Ceremony was observed. (See The Shakespeare | 


Memorial Theatre.) 

This can only be regarded as an outward sign of the connec- 
tion between Freemasonry Shakespeare and the Plays. There 
is no valid reason why Grand Lodge should be interested in the 
Stratford Shakespeare Theatre save the esoteric secret reason 
that the Creator of the Plays was also the Creator of the Craft. 


‘Tue Mysrery or SHAKESPEARE’S TOMB. 


In view of the unmistakable Masonic and Rosicrucian Signs 
on the Epitaphs (see Illustrations), the remarks of Wigston in 
A New Study of Shakespeare are of interest. He says (p. 367) 
that: 

“It is especially worthy of note that the Poet’s supposed 
gravestone does not state in words that it is Shakespeare’s at all, 
Tradition alone says that... .” How extraordinary is the 
mystery attached to the Poet’s grave at Stratford. For the vault 
(according to what testimony we have upon the matter) appears 
to be empty. 

Washington Irving relates that the old sexton who made 
bold enough to look into Shakespeare’s vault saw neither dust 
nor bone. And Dr. Ingleby endorses this fact by collateral 
evidence. He says (Shakespeare’s Bones, p. 31): “In 1796 the 
supposed grave was actually broken into in the course of digging 
a vault in its immediate proximity. . . . It is certain, I believe, 
that the original stone did not bear the name of Shakespeare 
any more than its successor. . . . 

"Y am informed on the authority or a FREE AND ACCEPTED 
mason that a Brother Mason of his has explored the Grave which 
purports to be Shakespeare’s and that he found nothing in it but 
DUST.” F 

One is tempted to ask, Why should a Freemason be brought 
in as a witness regarding an apparent Mystery re the Tomb 
unless it be a fact that there is some subtle connection between 
Freemasonry and the Plays, between Shakespeare and the Folio. 


Masonic Symsoutsm IN THE “OLÐ GREYFRIARS CHURCH” 
OF EDINBURGH, 1614. $ i 
This Old Church, in which was signed the Solemn League 
and Covenant in 1638, has been described as the Westminster 
of Scotland. 
268 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


Around the walls of the graveyard are many remarkable 
monuments. They clearly prove that some of the leading 
citizens of the City, about 1614 onwards for some decades, 
were Freemasons. On each of these monuments are engraved 
some wonderful symbols, exactly similar to the Symbolism to 
be found in the Elizabethan Rosicrosse books. 

Many of the monuments are flanked by the Two Pillars 
of Masonry. Carved in relief are to be found the “Tudor 
Rose,” the St. Andrew’s Cross with its Four Roses, the Triple 
Tau, “T.T.T.,” the Skull and Crossbones, the Coffin, the 
three Candles, the Hammer, the Rapier of the Master, the 
Rosicrosse Emblems of the Hour-glass associated with the 
Hand grasping a Bell to awaken the Sleeper—“'Tis Time,” 
—together with clusters of Fruits and Flowers. Even the 
Phallic Symbols of the Spade and the Distaff are to be seen, 
One carving, now crumbling away, associates these Symbols 
with Charon’s ferry-boat of the Mysteries. 

There is not a Symbol used in any of these Tombstones— 
a good number—which has not a special esoteric signification. 
It is impossible to believe that so many Symbols could be 
grouped on a single stone without a definite knowledge of 
Masonic phrase and imagery. There appears to have been quite a 
colony of Freemasons about 1614. ‘They must all have been 
fairly wealthy cultured “Gentlemen” for such monuments must 
have been very expensive. Their names and inscriptions — 
some in Latin—prove that they did not belong to the operative . 
class. 

So far as [ know attention has never yet been drawn 
to these remarkable Masonic Monuments of esoteric Symbolism. 
Students of “Origins” would be well advised to pay attention 
to them before they crumble into dust. They go far to prove 
that Freemasonry was well established in Scotland—amon, 
the Squire Boswells—from 1600, among “Gentlemen” of 
culture, not illiterate labourers, 


Masonic Symzots In AMERICA, Taree Hunprep Years 
Orp. 

. Leonell C. Strong, Esq., of the Yale University (School of 
Medicine) recently made an interesting discovery which proves 
conclusively that Masonic Symbolism was known in America 
long prior to 1717. On August 24, 1926, he wrote me : 

269 


























SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


“Can you give me any information on the letter G. The 
reason I ask is because Y can get very little information in this 
country. . . . Where did it come from ? 

“T discovered some time ago a SQUARE AND COMPASS cut into 
a large Boulder on the top of the highest land along the Atlantic 
seaboard. Above the Square and Compass was a St. Andrews 
Cross and between them was an ILM... . 

“I can find no masonic use of the ‘I.M.’ in this country...” 
Geological evidence pointed to the conclusion that the emblem was 
fully 300 years old, yet Mackay’s Encyclopedia declares that the 
letter G is a modern innovation not used in association with the 
square and compass before the end of the eighteenth century.” 

The letter “G.” was plucked by Shakespeare from the 
capital letters used with an esoteric significance by the 
Rosicrosse Literary Society, of which he was the Head. Shakes- 
peare obtained the idea of symbolising the Grand Geometrician 


of the Universe from the Capitals used by “Fra Rosi Crosse” - 


(the Heads of the Secret Elizabethan Litterateurs). He used 
the Symbol “G.” He thus identifies Freemasonry with the 
Literary Rosicrosse. This fact Shakespeare tells the reader quite 
clearly in Richard III, Act Is. 1,1. 55. . . . “And from the 
Cross Row (i.e. the Rosicrosse) plucks the Letter G.” He 
uses Capitals in order to write secretly, and some he uses with a 
special ethical significance such as G. or “I.M.” to denote the 
“Installed Master” in the examples noted in Chapter VII. 

‘The geclogical proof of these particular symbols dating 
back to the Elizabethan Era is not at all surprising and entirely 
confutes the short-sighted idea that such Symbolism was created 
from 1717-23-38 onwards. 

In the early years of Shakespeare England had begun her 
Colonial policy. “One: of his literary contemporaries was 
directly a Founder of New States, the Virginias and the 
Carolinas; thus making the New World English instead of 
Spanish. The Tempest—a purely Masonic Play—is supposed 
to have been inspired by one of the ships of Sir George Somers 
being driven out of her course when bound for Virginia by a 
“tempest” in mid-ocean, in 1609. For some nine months the 
shipwrecked sailors remained on an island—the Bermudas. 
Similar instances gave rise to much wandering on the part of 
sailors and emigrants in that Era along the Atlantic seaboard. 
And Masons—made in England, as we know they were through 


270 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE 


Bro. Anderson and Preston in the time of Elizabeth—and 
familiar with the Craft Symbolism, would be just as proud to 
leave their “Marks” behind them as the Scotch Masons were 
in the same period in the “Greyfriars Church” of Edinburgh. 


SHAKESPEARE'S CONNECTION WITH SECRET SocrETIES. 


In the light of modern research it can be proved to the hilt 
that Shakespeare was the driving power behind the secret 
literary and ethical movements of the era which really began 
with the establishment of a very small body called “Fra Rosi 
Crosse.” This literary coterie were the brains of the subsequent 
Secret Orders that came into existence—the Rosicrucian and 
the Masonic. The Rosicrucian Colleges were created in 
England, not Germany, and the present “§.R.LA.” (Societas 
Rosicruciana in Anglia) connected with Freemasonr ; is the 
direct descendant of the first. Elizabethan College mentioned 
by Ben Jonson. It is utterly inconceivable that R. W. Little, 
a clerk of the Freemasons’ Hall, crearen the Nine Degrees 
of the S.R.I.A. in 1865. He simply organised a Rite openly 
to the Masonic Order that had hitherto been in hiding from the 
days of Elizabeth. 

Thereisa solid body of evidence which warrants the following 
conclusions—evidence too extended to be given in this work— 
and which is of the highest importance to the Fraternity: 


I. "Fra Rosi Crosse” were the Invisible Brains of the ^ 
Secret Movement which was eminently literary but 

` which led to direct action in the creation of the Rosi- 
crucian Fraternity and the Masonic Brotherhood. 

2. The “Rosicrosse-Mason” was one who could read 
Signals in the printed text. The “Mason-Word” 
between the “Rosicrosse” was “Our Francis.” 

3- The Elizabethan “Rosicrucian” (S.R.LA.) did not 
necessarily know the identities of “Fra Rosi Crosse” nor 
their printed secrets. Rosicrucian secrets were limited 
then as to-day, to College secrets. A Rosicrucian was 
not of the Rosicrosse until he had been taught “how to 
read by using his eyes.” 

4. The “Craft-Mason” and the Higher Brother (at least 
up to and including “Thirty Two”) are exactly in the 
same position as the Rosicrucian. They know nothing 


271 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


of the “Hints” (i.e., as Lodge Secrets) of Bro. Anderson’s 
printed page, Bro. Preston’s “Art of Changes,” or Bro, 
Hutchinson’s “Faculty of Abrac,” the Official Historians 


of Grand Lodge. Rosicrosse Secrets centred in the . 


Personality of the Founder. | 


272 








-TO THE FREE THINKER AND STUDENT 


. Tue facts here outlined are by no means exhaustive. The 


evidence—though sufficiently extraordinary to demand attention 
—is but a fractional part of the complete presentation of the 
case which has still to be given to the world. - 

While engaged in this research work, I have corresponded 
with many scholars and Brethren, Many have interviewed me 
with formidable lists of questions regarding the Masonry of 
Shakespeare. Everyone has gone away completely satisfied 
with respect to the F reemasonry of the Plays and the Author's 
position 1n the Craft as the Father and Founder. 

Some Brethren have carefully studied the matter for them- 
selves in the old books along certain definite lines and checked 
the Manuscripts I have compiled. I know of no one who has 
not been thoroughly convinced of the truth I have enunciated, 

Out of a voluminous correspondence I quote sufficient to 
indicate the importance of the matter in the opinion of 
Freemasons of professional standing, 

J. Warron Rippon, P.M., Chairman of the Merseyside 
Masonic Research Association (Author): “I really cannot 
express my feeling as to the truly remarkable results of your 
examination of the two Plays, Loves Labours Lost, and The 
Tempest. The more one ponders over it, the more remarkable 
it seems to be... : 

“Your discoveries amaze me, and it is astonishing that no one 
has tumbled to it before. 

“It seems almost incredible that the plays should have so 
much hidden information which has remained undiscovered. 
It is wonderful how the items hang together to form a 
continuous story." 

J. CawPnzuL-Fourkss, Perth, Australia, M.W. Sov. Pr. of 
H.R.D.M., Em. Preceptor and Prior: “Your little book 
on the Masonry of Shakespeare’s Sonnets shares my waking 


s 273 








SHAKESPEARE, CREATOR OF FREEMASONRY 


hours. . . . Speaking personally, if I were 2 W.M. of an 
English Lodge I would present every newly raised M.M. with 
one. . . . I have been a student of Masonic origins all my 
Masonic life . . . a contributor on the research side to the 
Masonic papers. . . . The Masonic examples in Love's Labours 
Lost, and The Tempest are indisputable. . . . There is no 
doubt of the matter.” 

R. Moutron, Esg.: “I am writing this from the Bay of 
Biscay to thank you for the Revelation re the Founder of Masonry. 
- » + I am proud to think I once sat in Lodge with you many 
yearsago. . . . How my old dad who wasa great Shakespearean 
scholar would have loved to have known the truth. : . .? 

Pror, F. Lowry Crarke, Miami University, Oxford, 
Ohio, U.S.A: “Having had the privilege of going through the 
MSS. of your complete Work in your own home, I am thoroughly 
satisfied.. The evidence and logical deductions are quite 
irresistible." 

G. L. Emmerson, London, P.M., P.Z., etc.: “My Masonic 
friends who have had a sight of your paper would like me to 
thank you on behalf of the Craft for all the research and work 
that you must have put in to make such a paper possible.” - 

Jamzs Wa. Dunn, P.M., P.Z., 18°, Celebrant Mersey 
College, $.R.I.A.: “It is now about fifteen months since I was 
first moved by your lecture on "The Unknown Founder of 
Freemasonry.’ I felt at once that I was being drawn to the 
heart of a great Mystery and also a great Tragedy. . . . This 
revelation comes with such a blinding force of illumination that 
one is never afterwards the same; one walks in the Light and 
still cries for more Light. . . . 

“Tt is now thirty-two years since I first saw the Light of 
Masonry. But it seems that I have only been seeing through a 
glass darkly. I have been searching for a Lost Word... . I 
have found many Words... . Signs... Tokens... Vows.... 
But these things no longer draw me, neither do they awe me 
nor comfort me... . 4 

“There has now been revealed to me a MAN—a tragic man 
—ENGLAND’S SUPREME GENIUS, the Immortal Shakespeare 
whom you claim to be our Unknown Founder. With the talis- 
man you gave me I have tried to unravel the heart of the 

Mystery. ] 

"T have studied the Plays and Sonnets (particularly Love's 


274 





NOTES AND FACTS OF IMPORTANCE ' 


Labours Lost and The Tempest), the B. of C. of Bro. Anderson. 
I have studied the various cyphers and Seals you have shown me 
in that Book. I have pondered deeply many other Emblems 
2 "i or I have read Bros. Preston and Hutchinson, and 
e ats : at these early Masons knew what they were talking 

“The MSS. which you have placed at my di 

: y disposal make - 
thing abundantly clear. The amount of rascerch therein displaced 
and the cumulative effect of the astounding evidence therein 
fred m the Mis time leaves me no longer in doubt, 
ieee ike every member of our F raternity to be so 

“I now know that if we dig among the rubbish 

: f the 
Elizabethan era that we shall find ther: i C de rada 
which our superb edifice has been built ; r oe eran 

“And what a Stone it is! 

No rough ashlar, no perfect ashlar even, but, 

facetted gem-stone of reat purity, 
English Renaissance,” ` 


rather, a many 
a product peculiar to the 


275 














POSTSCRIPT 


“Now if any Brother or Well-wisher shall conscientiously 
doubt or be dissatisfied, touching any particular point contained 
in this Treatise, because of my speaking to many things in a 
little room: and if he or they shall be serious in so doing, and 
will befriend me so far, and do me that courtesie, to send to me 
before they condemn me, and let me know their scruples in a 
few words of writing, I shall look upon myself obliged both in 
affection and reason to endeavour to give them full satisfaction." 


AN ELIZABETHAN EMBLEM: 
THIRTY-THREE, 
SIGNIFYING 
MOAB'.... THE PRINCE OF DARKNESS. 





276 





INDEX 


A 


Æneas, the Mysteries, 123 
Addison, Joseph, his Masonic 
knowledge, 30 
on Capital Letter Codes, 153-4 
America and Symbolism pre- 
1717, 269 
Anagrams, 154 
D'Israeli on, 153, 263 
on Masonrie, 257 
Anderson, Dr. J., “ Constitu- 
tions,” 1723 Ed., 22, 25 
his Fabrications, 23 
Confusions, 25 
Knowledge of Secret Creator, 


35 

Sends the World astray, 41 

“Constitutions,” 1738 Ed., 
Printed Hints, 43~4, 193 

not a Creator, 73 

“Good Men and True,” 84, 
102 

his Rosicrosse-Code Know- 
ledge, 193 

a“ Mathematical Divine,” 201 

the Ancient Landmarks, 208 

his Literary Works, 215 

a Lecturer, 223  - 

as a Writer, 232 

and the Emergence, 1723, 237 

and Reservation of Truth, 247 

a Vindication, 250 

his Honour, 258 

Apollo, the Sonnet Sun-God, 80, 

104, 179, 184. 





Ariel, 95 

the Song of, 129 
Art Form, the Ritual as an, 217 
Ashmole, E., 32 
Athelstane, 31 

Edwin and York, 133 
Aubrey, John and F.M., 32 
Augustan Era, the, 212 
* A W.M.;" 60, 86, 126, 166 


B 


Bacon, Francis, The Advancement, 
I. 
Neo Atlantis, 40 
Essays, 203 
Beehive, the, 137 
Bible, the, James Edition, 31 
and F.M., 31, 211 
and the Ritual, 260 
in Feudal times, 260-1 
Blackham, Col., the Ritual, 24, 64 
Eng. Language in 1440, 256 

“BO,” 102, 167 

Boas, 105, 180-1 

Board of Installed Masters, IO4, 
107 

Boswell, Squire, and F.M., 33 

Brandes, Geo., Shakespeare’s 
Soul, 177 

Bray, Sir D., the Original Sonnet 
Order, 178 

Broadfoot, P., the Ritual, 205 

Bullamore, G. W., Apollo, 184 

. Old Charges, the, 257 


277 





INDEX 


c 


Cable-Tow, the, 34, 133 

Campbell, Lord, Shakespeare's 
Law, 48 

Castells, F., The Genesis of 
F.M., 22 

Claret, G., Ritual, 207 

Constitutions, the Book of, -and 
Purposeful Inventions, 43 

1738 Ed., and printed Hints, 


44» 193 ` 
Cooke MS., the, 31 
a Trick Document, 98-9 
Cotgrave on the word “ Mote,” 
115 
Customs, Masonic, 54, 57-61, 
81-118, 131-149 
their Evolution, 63 
their Remarkable Character, 
65 
Blinded Candidates, 80 
Climbing, 81 
‘the Ballot, 91 
Chalking the Floor, 129 
the Circle, 130 
the Sword, 130 
“ Calling Of,” 135 
Monthly Recitals, 136 
the Ceremonial, 144, 224 
Hoodwinks, 14.5-6 
Craft Rites pre-1717, 26 
Cypher Codes, 85, 111, 193-202 
the Ritual Letter Code, 126 
in Love’s Labours Lost and 
The Tempest, 150-173, 175 


D 
Desaguliers, T., Dr., Literary 
Work, 215 


the Lecturer, 223, 233 
his Honour, 258 





Development of Rituals, 209 

Diary, Shakespeare's, 174-191 

D'israeli, L, on Anagrams and 
Codes, 153, 263 

Dobson, Austin, the Restoration, 
212 

Dramatic Power of Ritual, 229 

Dugdale, Sir W., and F.M., 32 


E 


Edinburgh, Masonic Symbols, 
268 
Elizabethan Era, the, Barbaric 
Customs, 22, 96 R 
the Language, 31, 207,.262 
Books in English, 261 
Culture in the, 262 
the Scriveneries, 237, 266 
Elizabeth, Queen, Statute of 
Labourers, 27 
“Emulation " Working, 205 
English Grammar, the, 31 
Language in 1440, 256 
Modern English, the begin- 
- ning, 257 
Ethical Symbolism, 27, 34, 80- 
83, 87, 92-4, 96-7, 180, 
227-8, 255,268 - 
Examinations, Masonic, Pedestal, 
90, 93; 96, 109-10 
"Testing Strangers, 104 
Exposures of F.M., the, 30 
Evolution of Ritual, 210-11 


F 


“ Felling” a Name, 156 
Fellow Craft, the, 46, 111, 130, 
137, 160, 165 


278 





INDEX 


Findel, F. C., the Operatives, 24, 
251 
York Masonry, 133 
an Old Ritual, 137 
a textual critic, 233 
“ Gentlemen ” and operatives, 
, 254 ; 
the Genesis of F.M., 265 
Fort, G. F, operative craft 
destroyed, 26 s 
* Four Old Lodges," the, 23 
Pike, A., on the, 62. ^ 
were not operative, 210 
“Fra Rosi Crosse,” 194, 271 
their Secret Seal Numbers, 
195—202 
Freemasonry, the Origin of, 17, 
18, 21—35, 204 
the 1723 Emergence, 22 
from France, 41, 82 
a Protestant Era Creation, 32 
and the “New Command- 
ment,” 33 
in e Shakespeare Folio, 46- 
I 


and the Mysteries, 66 


and Stratford, 267 
Free Men, 79; 107 


G 


: * Gentlemen ? and the Masons, 


... 275 56, 101, 237, 263 
illiterate, 210, 234, 254—5 
Gilds, the Merchant and the 
Craft, 254. 
Gilkes, Peter, 208 . 
Goadby on Elizabethan Dialects, 
262 
on Schooling, 262 
Gould, on an * Original Ritual,” 
207 
on the operatives, 254 





Annual Assemblies of masons, 
254 
Philosophers and the Genesis, 


25 
Grand’ Lodge, The, an Organ- 
ization, 28, 208-16 
and Cypher Codes, 193 
as a Creative Committee, 21 5- 
16 
and the Emergence, 237 
and Shakespeare's Masonry, 
250 
of 1723, 250 
“ Grand Possessors,” the, 38~9, 
174, 194 
“ Great Folio,” the 1623, 34 
and the “ Grand Possessors,” 
-38 
and the Secret Seals, 196 
Green on young Shakespeare, 2 59 
s S Mu" "The, 132, 164, 170 
181 2 


H 


‘Hallam, H. the Shakespeare 


Enigma, 36 ; 
Hall, Manley, Origin of F.M., 
264. ae 
“Hat, the Good Man’s,” 84, 
102 NS 
Haughfoot MS., the, 30 
Haywood and Ebury, the Regius, 
256 
Operative organization, 260 
Higher Degrees, the, 22, 23, 88, 
108, 112, 161, 205, 214, 


265 
Hiram Abif and Hiram of Tyre, 
55 
the Legend. of, 62~73, 206, 
208 
the Murder, 139. 


279 


INDEX 


and Solomon’s Temple, 164 
the Principal, 167 
the Body of, 203 
Hobbs, W., the Ritual, 64 
Holme, Randle, F.M. in 1650, 


32 
Hooker, Ecclesiastical Polity, 31 
Hughan, W. J:, Origin of F.M., 


17, 215 
Hutchinson, W., Official His- 
torian, 35 ` 
F.M. unrelated to Architec- 
ture, 42 
Science of Abrac, 45, 201 


I 
Initiation, An, in Hamer, 58 
Installation, An, 113, 187 


Installed Master, the, 171-2 
. Board, 104, 107 


« J A," I 67 

Jachin, 109 

Jewels, 107, 142, 166, 170, 248 

Johnson, Samuel, Elizabethan 
Culture, 259 

Jonson, Ben, 74, 212, 224, 236 


K 


Kelso MS., the, 30 
Knight, Charles, the “ Grand 
` Possessors,” 38 
on Titus Andronicus, 74 
-m “LLL,” 75 
Knipe, Dr., on the “ St, Alban ”? 
Mystery, 31 








L 


Lee, Sir S., on Shakespeare, 36 
Sh. “New Methods,” 75 
Lewis, A., “ Emulation,” 207 
“ Liberal Arts,” the, 132 3 
Literary Characteristics of Ritual, 
203-238 
Lodge Ceremony, a, 100-2, 146 


. Lodge of “ Antiquity,” the, 28-9 


London and York Masonry, 30, 
134, 205, 264 
London Masons’ Company, 33 
“ Lost Word, The,” 45, 217 
Love's Labours Lost, 33 
"The Genesis of F.M., 74-118, 
245-6 


M 


* Machab . . .,” 100, 109 

Making, Passing, Raising in 1650, 
2 

Masons, 78, 100, 108 

Malone, E. (1788), on Athel- 
stane, 133 

Mark Antony, 224. 

Marks of Design, 241 3 

Martin, F., Ignorance of Masses, 
262-3 

Marshall, F. A., on “L.L.L.,” 


75 

on “ MOTE,” 114 
Masonic Knowledge, 48 

Allusions in the Plays, 49 

Authority pre-1717, 29 

the “ Eye,” 80 

Light, 80 

Jewels, 96, 107 . 

Speech, 104. 

Modernists, 208 

Line of Descent, 235 

Peculiar Proofs, 242 


280 





INDEX 


Nuggets in Shakespeare, 248 
Scholars, 249 
Masonry, Ethical, 180 * 
Genesis of, 264—5 
Masons, Rebellious, 253 
Mermaid Tavern, 229 
Missing Manuscripts, the Plays, 
the Bible, 207 
Monthly Recitals, 136 
Muggeridge, H., 205 
Mysteries, the, 21 
' and Hiram, 62 
and The Tempest, 120-1 
and the Ritual, 206 


N 


Naso, Ovidius, 95 
National Fraternity: 1717, the, 
6 


2I ; 
Nichol, Prof., the Hidden Poet, 
37» 227, 229 
Northumberland MS., the, 266 
Number-Counts in 1623 Folio, 
196 
and J. Anderson, 201 
and W. Preston, 201 
and W. Hutchinson, 201 


o 


Official Historians, the, 244, 249, 
250, 258 i 

Old Charges, the, 234, 258 

Oliver, Dr., the Third Degree, 
6 . 


5 
Operative Charges, the, 25 
as Warrants, 257 
Operative Craft, the, telescoped 
into Freemasonry, 24, 210 
its Death, 26, 206, 211, 252 
Customs, 88 





* Gentlemen " members, 210, 
264 
in 1717, 211 
Operatives, the, their wretched- 
ness, 209-10 
their wages, 253-4 
the Annual Assembly, 255 
their organization, 260 
their ignorance, 260-1 
Ophelia, Hamlet, an Initiation, 
58, 175 
Oracle, the, 126, 147-8 
Owen, Dr., on Shakespeare’s 
Masonry, 72 


P 


Parliaments Acts, the 1425, 26 
Statute of Labourers, Eliz., 27 


Paton, C. I., on Dr. Anderson, 
s 259 ` 
Pavement, the Black and White, 


147 
Pedestal Examinations, 109, 132 
Perfect Ceremony, the, 204. 
Phillipps, Halliwell (J. O. Halli- 
well) on Shakespeare’s Ac- 
complishments, 74 
and Masonry, 236 
the Regius Poem, 266 
Pike, A., “Four Old Lodges,” 
6 


3 
Symbolic Masonry, 255 
Plot, Dr. and “ St. Alban ", 31 
Poole, H., Rites pre-1717, 30 
the Old Charges, 258 
Pope, A., 212-13 
Pownall, Craft Chapters Illegal, 
6- 


2 
Preston, W., Official Historian, 
28 
the Secret Channel, 31 
“ the Art of Changes," 45 


281 





INDEX 


on Athelstane, 133 P 
Numbers and their Properties, 
201 
his Vindication, 250 
his alleged “ Credulity,” 259 
Prosper-O, 28 
the Art of, 119 
the Master, 120 
Promulgation, the Lodge of, 205 
Prose rendering of a Sonnet, 
182-8 f 
Pythagoras and ‘Tyre, 125, 173 
and Numbers, 196 


Q 


Queen Dido, 123 
Quincey, De, on F.M., 243-5, 
. 249 


R 


Reconciliation Lodge, the, 205 
Regius Poem, the,.31, 65 

a Trick Poem, 98, 99 

Shakespeare's Work, 134. 

and the masons, 255 

a Fabrication, 255, 256 

and “ Had-y-wyste,” 266 

a Scrivenery product, 267 
Rehearsals, Masonic, 103, 136 
Restoration, Literary Style, 212 
Ritual, Shakespeare the Author 

of, 35 e . 

the Marks of a Mason, 47 

its Evolution, 62-9 

the Writer of, 82, 113 

in MS., 94 

of the Rose Croix, 108 

Letter Code, 33, 58, 126, 150— 


173 
of the Cock and Dog, 136 s 





Literary Characteristics of, 
203-38 
Emulation, Stability, 205 
and Working Rules, 205 
and the Mysteries, 206 
Robertson, J. M., the Sonnet 
Problem, 176 . 
Robison, Prof., on the Genesis, 22 
Royal Arch, the, 23 
its Creation, 64. 
the Sash, 91 
Companion, 145 
Word, 171 
Rosicrucian Colleges, 194, 271 
and the Northumberland MS., 
266 
Rosicrosse-Masons, the, 32, 40, 
193-202, 238, 271 


S 
Sam’s Son (Samson), 86 (B. of C. 
gle. the Elizabethan, 
237, 266 
Second-sight of Rosicrosse- 
Masons, 32 
Set Squares of the I.M., 34, 252 
Shakespeare, William, his Vocab- 
ulary, 31, 208 
L.L.L., 33, 74-118 
the First Freemason, 34, 37 
and the 1623 Folio, 34. 
and the 1723 Emergence, 35 
the Mystery of, 36-46. 
his careful revisions, 37 
the MSS. of, 37 
an Ethical Teacher, 37, 395 
246-7 
Sonnets, Benson Medley, 41 
` a personal Tragedy, 41 
. buries his Name, 42 
the Hiram Myth, 67-73 


282 





INDEX 


and “ Feigned Tales," 66 
as Father of the Craft, 73. 97; 
237 
his accomplishments, 74. 
Knowledge of “ Degrees,” 107 
buries the Genesis in L.L.L. 
112 
welds F.M. to the Mysteries 
in The Tempest, 119-149 
as Prospero, 119 
the Creator of the Regius and 
Cooke MSS., 134 
creator of Cock and Dog 
Ritual, 137 
his Last Words, 148 
Sonnet Codes, 151 
and his Sonnet Diary, 174-91 
the Concealed Man, 230 
his Personal Identity, 230 
a “ Worthy Fellow,” 239-251 
his Royal Art, 241 
the Supreme Dramatist, 236 
his Philanthropia, 245 
the Scrivenery of, 267 
the Tomb, 268 
Signs, F.M., and Tudor Penal- 
ties, 40, 97 
and Knocks, 140, 141 
Penal, 143 
Signals in Printed Books, 41 
Skull and Cross Bones, 146 
Smedley, T., Books in 1566, 261 
Solomon’s Temple, 63, 65, 81, 
138, 145, 168, 208, 226 
Solomon, King, and the Beggar, 
87, 92 
“So Mote It Be,” the Origin, 
114, 117, 168-9 
“ Sons of the Widow,” 124 
Spenser, “ Shepherd’s Calendar,” 
31 
Spectilative and operative Graft- 
ing, 98, 99 
the York operative Charges, 
133, 206 Ne 





Stability Working, 205 
St. Alban, “ A.D. 303,” 31 

“ A.D. 1561-1626,” 31, 237 
Steevens, J., the Genesis, 265 
Stratford Memorial, the, 267 
Still, Colin, Shakespeare’s Mystery 

Play, 120 

“ S.R.LA,,” 194 


T 


“TAU,” 171 
Temple of F.M., the, 34 
Tempest, The,” 119-49 
Masonry and the Mysteries, 
c 245-6, 270 
Theobald, B. G., Elizabethan 
Culture, 262 
Theory, the 1717, 209-10 
Third Degree Death Rite, the, 
62, 164. 
Dr. Oliver on, 65 
in «The Tempest,” 127, 141 
"Three Degrees pre-1626, 203, 
208, 229, 234 
Titus Andronicus, 74 
Theosophic Mysticism, 214. 
Trinity College MS., 30 
"Triumviry, the Masonic, 96 
Troilus and Cressida, 37 
“TT.” Symbols, 105, 178 
"Tyre, Hiram of, 124 


y 


Vibert, L., the Ritual, 24, 26 
the Craft dies, 27 
F.M. and 8t. Alban, 37 
on the Royal Arch, 64, 65 
on masons and daubers, 254 


283 





INDEX 


and the illiterate operatives, 
256 : 
on the Bible, 260 
Virgil's ZEneid, 123 


wW 


Waite, A. E., the birthplace of 
E.M., 23, 24 
and pre-1717 Rites, 26 
the Tyburn Tree, 97 
on Ritual Development, 209 
and the Invention of Sym- 
bolism, 214 
Ward, Dr. on Shakespearian 
Biography, 36 
Walters, Cuming, Shakespeare’s 
Diary, 177 
Warrants, the Lodge, 103 
Whateley, Archbishop, 226 
Widow Dido, 122, 124-5 
Widower Eneas, 123 
Wigston, W. F. C., The Mys- 
teries and The Tempest, 120 
on Tyre and Pythagoras, 126 
Woodford, Rev. W., on W. 
"Preston, 259 
the Genesis, 22 
Working Rules of F.M., the, 205 
Words, Masonic : 
Tubal, 55 
Solomon, 49 
St. John, 49 
Jerusalem, 50 











Worshipful Master, 50 

Prosper, 52 

Hiram, 55 

Matchpin and Maughbin, 56 

Scribe, E., 57 

Sojourner, 57 

used by Design, 61 

All-Seeing Eye, the, 80 

the W.M., 86 

the Lodge,-87 

the J.W., 90 

blackbails, 9r 

Hoodwinks, the, 9r 

Pomegranate, 93 

Charity, 98 

Joshua, 102 

BO., 102, 167 

Machab . . ., roo, 109 

Boas, 105 

Jachin, rog 

Ja, 167 

Gloves, 103 

Apron, x11 

“So Mote It Be,” 114 

Line and Level, 128 

Mop and Pail, 129 

the passwords, 138 
Worthy Fellow, the, 34, 252 


Y 


Yarker on the Higher Degrees, 
236, 265 

York and London Masonry, 30, 
134, 205, 264 





i